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One Fine Day Paperback – September 1, 1974


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One Fine Day + The Little Island (Dell Picture Yearling) + Marshmallow
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 1080L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Aladdin; Reprint edition (September 1, 1974)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0020436203
  • ISBN-13: 978-0020436201
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 10.1 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,483 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Nonny Hogrogian is a two-time winner of the Caldecott Medal, first for Always Room for One More (1966), and second for One Fine Day (1972). She also received a Caldecott Honor for The Contest (1974). Her husband, poet David Kherdian, received a Newbery Honor for The Road from Home: The Story of an Armenian Girl (1979). They live in Florence, Massachusetts.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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This book won the Caldecott in 1972.
Kara Reuter
Further, most people want something in exchange even if they are willing to help.
Donald Mitchell
A wonderful book with beautiful illustrations.
Raluca M. Vandergrift

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 24, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book won the Caldecott Medal as the best illustrated children's story of 1971. The vivid colors will brighten your day! The story itself is a retelling of an Armenian folk tale.
The book is exceptional for the fable, the moral it tells, and the dynamic illustrations that turn the fox's frustration into an adventure for the reader.
"One fine day
a fox traveled through a great forest.
When he reached the other side he was very thirsty."
"He saw a pail of milk that an old woman had set down
while she gathered wood for her fire."
"Before she noticed the fox, he had lapped up most of the milk."
"The woman became so angry that she grabbed her knife and
chopped off his tail . . . ."
Thus, the story begins.
The fox begs for the old woman to sew his tail back on. Otherwise, "all my friends will laugh at me."
"'Give me back my milk,' she said, 'and I'll give you back your tail.'"
The fox finds a cow who is willing to help, but wants grass in return. The fox asks a field for some grass, and the field asks for some water. The fox goes to the stream, which tells him to get a jug for the water. From there, the fox finds a fair maiden who has a jug, but wants a blue bead. The fox finds a peddler who has a blue bead, but wants an egg. An hen offers an egg in exchange for some grain. The fox finds a miller who has grain.
"The miller was a good man and felt sorry for the fox."
With the grain given to him by the miller, the fox proceeds to do all of his barters.
In the end, the old woman "carefully sewed his tail in place, and off he ran to join his friends . . . .
Read more ›
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "charlie4" on June 25, 2000
Format: Library Binding
In this story, the fox has his tail cut off by a woman who is angry because the fox drank her milk. The fox asks for his tail back and the woman says only if the fox returns her milk. Herein lies the tale. The fox embarks on a journey taking him to the cow who will give him milk only if he is fed, which leads the fox to a field who will give up his grass only if he receives water, which leads the fox to the ....and the tale goes on and on. The fox does eventually get his tail back. My 3 year old son is perplexed by this story and his listens with rapt attention. It is a good bedtime story because the story builds on itself and the phrases are repeated again and again and again. This book also won a Caldecott Medal for illustration. Recommended.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Susan K. Schoonover VINE VOICE on May 19, 2008
Format: Paperback
Most kids of "picture book age" are attracted to cumulative tales like THE OLD LADY WHO SWALLOWED A FLY or THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT because of the repetitive patterns and the easy logic to the simple plots. ONE FINE DAY is another great example of a cumulative tale. The basic story involves a talking fox who drinks an old woman's milk. In a rather violent move that doesn't seem to bother most kids the woman bloodlessly cuts off the fox's tail and refuses to "sew it back on" until the fox gives her back the milk. The now tail free but still resilant fox goes through the forest and tries to barter some milk from a cow who will give him milk if he gives her grass, a field that will yield grass if the fox will give it water, a stream that will give water if the fox brings a jug and so on. Our fox hero is finally triumphant and brings the replacement milk to the old woman who true to her word "carefully sews his tail in place" and all ends happily as the fox "ran to join his friends on the other side of the forest."

The illustrations are appropriate and well convey the setting which appears to be Eastern Europe in a past century. Kids seem to like the reassuring ending to the fox's problem as well as the classic repetition of the folk tale.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. Heiss on June 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is FUN to read out loud, very fast. Very fast.

Simple and cute illustrations get the job done. The story line starts with a theft, then proceeds to a dismemberment, and relies on pleading and - finally - charity to resolve the problem.

We very much prefer a similar story called "The Scarecrow's Hat" by Ken Brown -- get what you want without whining or complaining.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Yvonne S. Minassian on August 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
The abovementioned reviewer of One Fine Day has missed several fine points Nonny Hogrogrian's book possess. The books repetition of themes and jaunts of the fox are the charming and educational elements that captivate an early reader or storyteller.

The illustrations are not a modern version of Patricia Polacco. If the reviewer were familiar with the ethnic similarities of Hogrogrian's characters to Polacco's, wide and unique differences exist. Hogrogrian's characters are classic to her numerous illustrations in other books. She uses her Armenian background to give character and emotion to her drawings.

The story is a familiar one and a fable used by other writers. Hogrogrian's touch through her unique illustrations make it a winner.

The above mentioned reviewer concludes his review by stating, for a Caldecott winner, Hogrogrian's book is "small and unassuming". I would have to disagree and encourage the reviewer to not bypass the less flashy and "fab" words that exist in so many books today.

How fortunate for children everywhere, that the Caldecott Award panel chose to not overlook the quiet beauty and unique character illustrations in selecting this classic book a winner.
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