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One Good Dish Hardcover – October 22, 2013


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Brassicas
Browse cookbooks for gourmets and food-related reads that inspire in Foodie Favorites for Spring.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Artisan (October 22, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1579654673
  • ISBN-13: 978-1579654672
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 0.9 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,870 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Tanis (A Platter of Figs) turns his focus to an eclectic array of simple, casual meals that satisfy and are appropriate to be eaten at any time of day. Tanis's whimsy runs from bread, snacks, and condiments to vegetables, griddled foods, desserts, and more. Waffle-iron grilled cheese, gorgonzola and walnut crostini; and ham and gruyere bread pudding are highlights among the rustic offering of bread entries. Snack options are diverse and wholly appetizing, including smaller nibbles such as quail eggs with flavored salt and cucumber spears with dill, along with more substantial dishes such as potato salad with peppers and olives, polenta pizza with crumbled sage, and cold chicken with spicy scallion oil. His chapter titled Eating with a Spoon centers on pleasures in a bowl and contains a full-bodied, save-your-life garlic soup, rice porridge with salted egg, yellow risotto with saffron and lemon, and clams in the shell with fennel and parsley. Recipes based on vegetables are robust and inventively appealing, including long-cooked kale, which incorporates Spanish chorizo and red pepper flakes; well-charred endives with anchovy butter; and braised lettuce, sweet peas, and ham. Accompanied by numerous full-color photographs, the recipes in this collection are suitable for solo dining or entertaining guests and are certain to please. (Nov.)

Review

Top 10 Cookbooks of the Year, Washington Post

 

Top 10 Cookbooks of the Year, Entertainment Weekly

 

Best Books of 2013, NPR

 

Best of the Year in Cookbooks, Amazon

 

Top 10 Cookbooks for Fall 2013, Publishers Weekly

 

 

“Trust David Tanis to keep it real. . . . The oeuvre [of One Good Dish] is modern and American, unfussy and charming.” —Washington Post

 

“Simple, casual meals that satisfy. . . . Robust and inventively appealing.”Publishers Weekly, starred review

 

“This is the book that I will pick up when I’m hungry but not quite sure for what, for these dishes are inspiring yet can be made without a lot of fuss. . . . Who would enjoy this book? People who enjoy simple, delicious, no-fuss cooking and who appreciate well-written recipes.” —TheKitchn

 

“Fresh, with a focus on flavor.” —Charleston Post & Courier

 

“Elegant but uncomplicated recipes.” —Charlotte Observer

 

One Good Dish focuses on simplicity and vibrant flavor by introducing just a few inspired twists to turn relatively simple dishes into dazzlers.” —New York Daily News

 

“This eclectic mix from a New York Times writer comprises mainly one-dish recipes for, he writes ‘the way I cook and eat day-to-day.’ Stale bread becomes spaghetti with bread crumbs and pepper. Warm French lentil salad can feed a crowd on a cool day. Tanis also includes desserts (espresso-hazelnut bark, tangerine granita) with pleasingly short ingredient lists.” —People

 

“Global comfort food.” —RealSimple.com

 

“A book to browse when you’re in need of new inspiration and want some insight from a wise, seasoned and opinionated cook.” —FoodandWine.com


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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Beautiful pictures, too.
Barbara A. Gutek
No regrets about buying this cookbook...I did do the Kindle version...might get the paper book for my other house.
Rebecca G Egan
I love the simplicity and originality of the recipes, which I have yet to try,so can't comment on this.
K. Merkley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

82 of 83 people found the following review helpful By I Do the Speed Limit TOP 500 REVIEWER on October 22, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I once had a professor who repeatedly said "To the point!" as he paced in front of the class. And he stared us in the eye and jabbed his index finger in our direction to em-pha-size his "point". He turned out to be a darn good teacher--at least I retained the information and the concepts that he was trying to convey to us. He would emphasize what, in his mind, was at the heart of the matter: That precise, little tidbit of information, that gem of an idea, which would provide enlightenment. I hadn't thought of that professor in decades. Interesting, that my brain reminded me of that professor as I digest this cookbook...

Tanis has a similar urge to teach and encourage, and to convey his point: To create the perfect, pleasurable and satisfying taste sensation, you don't have to spend the day in the kitchen; you don't have to stock your shelves with expensive and exotic ingredients; you don't have to create multiple-course meals; you don't have to create elaborate sauces or labor through long ingredient lists, and you don't have to use the latest new-fangled kitchen appliances. Do it simply, and do it with an acute understanding of a few perfectly chosen ingredients.

To help convey his attitude towards recipes and cooking, Tanis has chosen just 100 of his favorite recipes and handed them to us in this beautifully done book. It appears that he has refined his top recipes, his "keepers", to be as perfect and precise and true as possible. It has gorgeous pictures and page layouts that are easy on the eye and easy to follow. Plus Tanis is a good writer and his words are well worth reading. In a way, this is a soothing and relaxing book. Its content invites creativity; it is full of calm assurance and composed authority.
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58 of 60 people found the following review helpful By PennyRose on October 27, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
When I first leafed through the book, I was a touch annoyed at what seemed a few too many "lazy" recipes. To illustrate, I am talking about the likes of prosciutto and fruit (literally slices of ham combined with fresh fruit), waffle iron grilled cheese (only real difference to the ordinary version being the waffle pattern) or garlic toast (recommending "fruity" extra virgin olive oil doesn't really reinvent the classic).
HOWEVER, the rest of Tanis's collection amply made up for my initial irritation. Those recipes are sheer genius. And I am not just talking about the more elaborate ones like his delectable Tunisian meatballs. Spicy stovetop flatbreads make a simple but impressive side, hot or cold mussels on the half-shell are great prepare-ahead stunners for a party, and I dare you to stop eating the anchovy-garlic spread. You'll be unable to. Just as the quick scallion kimchee will be a life changer if you follow Tanis's recommendation of adding it to your ham sandwich.
I could go on, waxing lyrical about the fortifying winter minestrone, easy and lovely speckled sushi rice with nori and fresh-pickled ginger, or highly addictive sweet-and-salty nut brittle. But really, you should just do yourself and everyone you cook for a favour and buy this beautifully photographed and all-round delightful gem of a cookbook.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By synchrony on December 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love to read about what great chefs cook at home. Not the gravity-defying plates put together with a huge assortment of ingredients in their restaurants - a sauce, plus a glaze, plus a garnish in one dish, but what they cook and eat without an audience. The shorter the ingredient list and the more accessible, the better.

Google "My Favorite Simple Roast Chicken Recipe" by Thomas Keller. You'll never roast chicken any other way. Or follow what Nigel Slater does with veggies from his backyard garden in "Tender".

Look at the cover picture of "One Good Dish". Thinly sliced radishes. Sprinkled with sea salt. A dollop of whipped creme fraiche. And a grind of black pepper. Four ingredients. A really delightful way to savour radishes, even if you weren't a radish fan (I certainly wasn't).

Forget raw kale or kale chips. Kale simmered to silken tenderness in a chorizo stew elevates it to something else. David Tanis is a master and I have all his cookbooks. But this one is something else. Who knew red wine diluted with a bit of cold water and ice can be so refreshing?

And his chai made from scratch - I am from India - is the real deal.

I have hundreds of cookbooks by a pantheon of world-renowned chefs. This is the kind of book I go back to time and time again.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Heather Stroh on October 30, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am pretty picky about cookbooks. One reason is because there's usually only a few recipes that I fall in love with, so I end up purchasing the entire book. This book, though, seemed to catch my interest because of its unique creativity with food & presentation. When I bought it, I took a chance. It just came in the mail, and it has to be one of the best cookbooks I've ever purchased. I cannot wait to try not only a few recipes....but I cannot wait to try ALL of them. Every single page drew interest.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By I. Darren on January 14, 2014
Format: Hardcover
To paraphrase this book's title, if you only will buy "One Good Book" in the coming months…

Here is a rich indulgence of simplicity, authenticity and enjoyment. A basic concept: 100 different, enjoyable "utopian" recipes that can either stand alone or be combined into a larger meal. Attempting to make an ultimate dish whilst not necessarily requiring the skills of a Michelin-starred chef with a budget to match, this is something that anybody who loves good food cannot fail to enjoy.

Some of the recipes sound simple, such as "Real Garlic Toast" whilst others are perhaps a lot more esoteric like "Speckled Sushi Rice With Nori" and a few have you doing a double-take with a name like "Cheese in a Jar". If you like great, quality food photography this is certainly a book for you too with the photographer carefully letting the food be the star rather than some artistic interpretation. That said, many of these pictures could be framed and hung on a wall!

The recipes themselves are fairly well written, clear to understand and draw you in, aided by a brief introduction and dispersal of a hint, tip or pearl of wisdom. Sadly our "usual niggles" about the lack of an estimated preparation and cooking time along with the sole use of U.S. imperial measures are relevant here, slightly taking off the gloss for this book but in no way is this a deal-breaker. One hopes that the promised index for this book is comprehensive and navigable as this is essential yet this was missing in this pre-release review copy so no opinion can be given over this often critical, yet under-appreciated feature.

This is by no means your usual run-of-the-mill recipe book and this adds to the charm.
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