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One Green Apple Hardcover – June 12, 2006


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 450L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Clarion Books; First Printing edition (June 12, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0618434771
  • ISBN-13: 978-0618434770
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 0.1 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #312,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-4–As a Muslim girl rides in a hay wagon heading to an apple orchard on a class trip, the dupatta on her head setting her apart, she observes that while some of the children seem friendly, others are not. Her father has explained, …we are not always liked here. Our home country (never named in the story) and our new one have had difficulties. Later, when she puts a green apple into the cider press instead of a ripe red one as her classmates have done, they protest. But the cider from all their apples mixed together is delicious–a metaphor for the benefits of intermingling people who are different. Lewin's watercolors radiate sunlight and capture the gamut of emotions that Farah experiences on this challenging second day in her new school in the U.S. They show her downcast silence and sense of isolation because she can't speak the language, her shy smile when a classmate befriends her, and, finally, her triumphant smile as she speaks one of her first English words, App-ell. This story, along with Bernard Wolf's Coming to America: A Muslim Family's Story (Lee & Low, 2003), can heighten youngsters' awareness of what it must be like to feel different and alone and that each person has something unique to contribute to the good of all.–Marianne Saccardi, formerly at Norwalk Community College, CT
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Gr. 1-3. This poignant, attractive offering fills a growing need for picture books about contemporary immigrants of Arab descent, without limiting its relevance to a single ethnic group. On her "second day in the new school in the new country," Farah, who cannot speak English, joins her class on a field trip to an apple orchard, where she enjoys the sunny day but feels desperately isolated, "tight inside [herself]." Though Farah wears a headscarf and knows that there are "difficulties" between her native and adoptive countries, specifics of religion and politics never distract from the child's experiences: the hay smelling of "dry sunshine," the spark of optimism kindled when classmates accept her help at the cider press. Young readers will respond as much to Bunting's fine first-person narrative as to Lewin's double-page, photorealistic watercolors, which, though occasionally stiff, plainly show the intelligence behind Farah's silent exterior. The old-fashioned assimilation metaphor Farah sees in the cider-making experience ("I will blend with the others the way my apple blended with the cider") needn't have been so overt, but with its large, read-aloud-friendly trim size and its age-appropriate premise, this book will work beautifully for teachers hoping to foster empathy for immigrant students, or for use in furthering character education aims. Jennifer Mattson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Eve Bunting has written more than 200 books for children, many of which can be found in libraries around the world. Her other Clarion titles for very young readers include My Big Boy Bed, which was also illustrated by Maggie Smith, and Little Bear's Little Boat, illustrated by Nancy Carpenter. She lives in Pasadena, California.

Customer Reviews

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The story is simple yet so poignant, and the illustrations are magnificent.
busymama
Her simple story helps us understand the feelings of one of the many immigrant children striving to make their way on our American world.
American Immigration Council's Community Education Center
Teachers/Librarians: makes a great read-a-loud for any level: Kindergarten - 6th grade.
AWAIR Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Julie Olsen Edwards on January 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Eve Bunting has done it again. This is a perfect book with a simple, exquisite story that does not preach or lecture, but reveals the heart of what it is like to be an immigrant child, with out English, on the first day of school in the U.S. That the protaganist is a Muslim child adds to its impact, and that it ends with warmth and hope is its power. Bravo!!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By M. J. Podzielinski on September 8, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Eve Bunting portrays a warm look at the plight of one immigrant girl transitioning to an American classroom for the very first time. I read this book with second graders yesterday (who have a brand new student from Norway in their midst) and I think all of them felt compassion for their friend's situation. The illustrations are amazing and Ted Lewin has used his wife Betsy to portray the role of the teacher. This is truly a book that should not be missed.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Reader on March 13, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I wholeheartedly recommend this book to any caretaker or teacher who wishes to introduce their young person to multicultural themes.

This book is especially worthy because of the Caldecott-winning illustrator. It authentically portrays what a Muslim's experience might be like as a newcomer to this country, which is not always too pretty. However, the book ends on a very positive note. "One Green Apple" is simply worth it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By busymama VINE VOICE on June 13, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I wish I could give this book more than 5 stars. The story is simple yet so poignant, and the illustrations are magnificent.

We are preparing to adopt children from another country, and we found this book to be extremely helpful in showing our existing children (ages 4.5 and 6.5) what it would be like to suddenly find yourself in a country where you look different, dress differently, and don't speak the language. This is an amazing book because it really makes the children feel for the girl, to put themselves "in her shoes" and show them why tolerance and warmth and friendliness to others are so important. It is a great book for starting a discussion. I felt like my 6.5 year old really "got it" but even my 4.5 year old was able to understand the basics and to have a bit of a conversation about it. I think that generally it would be good for ages 5-10.

We got this from the library, but we may just have to buy it and add it to our bookshelf. Love it.
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Format: Hardcover
Farah, a young Muslim girl, begins her story on her second day in a new school in a new country. She listens and nods but doesn't speak. So many things are strange to her, including the cloths and language. Her class is going on a field trip to an apple orchard where they will each pick an apple to be made into cider. When she puts a green apple into the cider press instead of a ripe red, one as her classmates have done, they symbolically protest. But the cider from all the apples they have mixed together is a beautiful metaphor for the benefits of intermingling different people. Farah begins to make friends. She even learns a new word "App-ell." Her simple story helps us understand the feelings of one of the many immigrant children striving to make their way on our American world. Tee Lewin's gorgeous full-page watercolors depict the apple picking adventure. This is a great picture book for early primary and ESL classrooms.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Pellerine on December 31, 2010
Format: Hardcover
A superb story of a little girl, Farah, and her migration abroad and how she is able to gain a grip on the transition through friendship at a school outing to an apple orchard. It is a nice story, especially for educators, attempting to deliver implicit lessons on caring, compassion, and simply taking care of your neighbors and being a decent human.

Easy to recommend.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By 8692959603 on October 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Can you imagine moving to a new country? Farah in the book One Green Apple faces a challenge on her journey to understand English and fit in her new school. She is a new girl that wants to speak English. The narrator tells us "It is my first outside-myself word. There will be more", which is a clue on her journey learning to speak English. One Green Apple is a book about a girl who learns how to live in a new country.
By Lexy
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By CarefulParent on September 30, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A refreshing approach to the assimilation issues of a new immigrant. Honest, light-filled artwork, and simple sentences easily understood by the youngest reader. Touching, yet not designed to be. Practical storyline works for students of all ages.
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