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One Hour Photo 2002 R CC

(495) IMDb 6.8/10
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An alienated photo-finisher's obsession with a seemingly ordinary family culminates in his bizarre confrontation with an unfaithful father.

Robin Williams, Connie Nielsen
1 hour, 36 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller
Director Mark Romanek
Starring Robin Williams, Connie Nielsen
Supporting actors Michael Vartan, Dylan Smith, Erin Daniels, Paul Hansen Kim, Lee Garlington, Gary Cole, Marion Calvert, David Moreland, Shaun P. O'Hagan, Jim Rash, Nick Searcy, Dave Engfer, Jimmy Shubert, Eriq La Salle, Clark Gregg, Andy Rolfes, Carmen Mormino, Izrel Katz
Studio 20th Century Fox
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

80 of 83 people found the following review helpful By Algernon D'Ammassa on August 25, 2002
Much of the attention this film receives will likely focus on Robin William's performance as Sy, a lonely, middle-aged man who works at the photo booth of a chain department store in what looks like California. Williams has turned in a melange of performances in twenty years: some gripping, and some cliche. He's good at extroverted bursts of energy; he can also soften his eyes and wrap himself around your heart. This, however, is his finest hour. He completely departs from his previous characters and creates a character that is fully realized, multi-dimensional, and psychologically on-target. It his breakthrough performance as a serious actor.
It would be a shame, however, not to notice that this is also a very well-made film. A very sad but all-too-familiar story about loneliness and social isolation unfolds at a compelling pace, with a script that resists patronizing its subject or sensationalizing it. We have no choice but to notice the use of color to distinguish worlds; the flat, washed-out landscape in which Sy is imprisoned, and the lush, brilliant hues of the family life he aches for.
As events unfold, we stick to Sy's personal tragedy and his rage rather than follow standard horror-movie cliches, making the suspense and the horror genuine and harrowing. Do not less this one pass by.
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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By K. Wyatt on September 21, 2003
Format: DVD
Given the backdrop of the local SavMart and the stunning performance of Robin Williams, this film is a deeply scary thriller that will have you on the edge of your seat all the way through; whether it's out of complete fear of what his character will do next or the embarrassment he faces for his actions.
This is most certainly Robin Williams scariest role to date and one in which he's least like himself as he's completely suppressed his comedic nature for the almost clinical persona of Seymour "Sy" Parish. He certainly deserves any and all accolades he earns from this film. Connie Nielsen performs admirably in this film as well.
In his feature film directing debut, Mark Romanek has written and directed a pure psychological thriller masterpiece. From the simple concept of looking at a SavMart like store and coming up with this script, he has shown an amazing talent. This is a director whose films are to be looked out for in the future.
The soundtrack for this film is also quite dead on with every sequence and adds beautifully to the suspenseful nature of the film.
The premise:
Seymour "Sy" Parish (Robin Williams) works at the local SavMart as the photo technician. He's been working there for eleven years and in a large sense he has no life other than his job. During his daily routine at work, he sees everybody's lives, or more succinctly, their more joyful moments, in the pictures they bring in to be developed. Somewhere along the line he has become thoroughly infatuated with one particular family, the Yorkins. Sy even fantasizes about being Uncle Sy in the Yorkin family.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Rich Stoehr on September 25, 2003
Format: DVD
Right up front: I'm a fan of Robin Williams. I think he's a comic genius and a fine actor to boot.
With this in mind, I pretty much expected to enjoy "One-Hour Photo." I thought it could be an challenging role for Williams, and it had been a while since I really saw him stretch himself much. I didn't really know what to expect from the film as a whole, though. I was very pleasantly surprised.
"One-Hour Photo" is one of those atmospheric films that seem to happen by chance every now and again, happy accidents of mood and observation that seem almost accidentally skillful, but most likely are good by design. The director, in a DVD commentary, expresses the fact that one of the motivating themes behind the style of the film was a fascination with the massive discount store chains that have spread rapidly across America in the last couple of decades. It's a thematic element which shows through in almost every scene, most especially in the expansive, clean shots of the store interior, and mirrored in the ordered simplicity of the decoration and furnishings in Williams' character's house. By contrast, other locations seem complex, chaotic, even messy.
Another impressive element of the film is the use of color. Early on, in a bit of narration, Williams' photo clerk describes his disdain for the work of most one-hour photo labs, criticizing them for prints which are too dark or too light, or in which the color is improperly balanced. In another scene, later, Williams gets into a loud argument with a technician about a slight blue shift in the photo processing machine he uses. Williams speaks with pride of the care he takes in getting colors perfect in his prints. This immediately made me start looking for color and light cues in the film itself, and there are many to find.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Darren on February 17, 2003
Format: DVD
Don't expect One Hour Photo to be spoon fed. This movie will force you to generate some of your own conclusions about you've witnessed.
Robin Williams gives one of his best performances to date as an appearingly mild mannered yet devious photo clerk who takes his job as a photo tech at the local "Sav-Mart' a bit too serious because it appears to be all he has.
His emotional pathology becomes progressively evident and alarming as he becomes increasingly 'over-involved' with a family that brings in their photos to his store for processing. Although he blatantly oversteps some major boundaries, he does so in such a way that the seriousness of his disturbance is not realized soon enough. Some of his bizarre behaviors lead your thoughts to very dark places while at the same time, the pity his character generates, makes you want to believe that maybe his motivations really aren't that pathological.
Because Williams character evokes such a wide range of emotion, your own feelings towards him vaccilate. He is devious yet likable even amidst his pervading creepiness. Although appearingly generally mild mannered and timid, he has his moments of assertiveness and later, 'over the edge' aggressiveness and righteous indignation.
The cinematography and visual imagery is excellent and brilliantly contrasts the drab, washed out and somewhat color-less life of William's character to that of the vivid and vibrant family he becomes "focused" on.
It's a good psychological thriller. Like a photo snapshot, there's much more to this film than what we see on the surface.
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