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on November 21, 2012
This is a book about integrity, character, perseverance and love written by the son of the founder of Trek Bicycle Corporation. The author takes the reader through the history of the company and its successes and failures, while bringing his late father, Dick, to life as he recounts the special relationship that they enjoyed. By the end of the book, you will feel that you knew Dick Burke personally. The "20 Greatest Moments" chapter is especially thought-provoking for those of us whose own parents are in their later years. And anyone who follows the strategies for success will be well on the road to achieving it. An excellent read!!
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on January 11, 2013
Quick easy read, the story of Trek is sometimes interesting. Yet I never felt quite connected to John and his Dad. I usually love all father-son books and blubber at all of them. This one not so much. Maybe it is just John's writing style or the rapid progression through their lives that doesn't allow the connection for me. This was my first e-book purchase on Kindle, and really don't recommend it even for the $8.95 I paid for it, maybe if it gets down to sub $5. To be clear, this is just my review of the book, the Burkes themselves seem like wonderful folks and I would like to have known The Big Guy and John writes with great love and respect and honor for him.
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on March 2, 2013
If you liked the book Tuesdays with Morrie, then you might enjoy this one as well. It's full of life's little lessons (or cliches), with the student learning from the master. It's also a fast read, something you can finish over an afternoon.

But where it falls short for me is both the timing of the book and the lack of depth. As far as the lack of depth is concerned, the Prologue was by far the best section, focusing on the history of Trek Bikes with both author and Dad as the dynamic duo. But that's where it ended for me. The story continues with the decline of the late great Richard Burke, but never really pulls you into the story of Trek and it's unique founder. Finally, the timing of this publication should at least raise an eyebrow or two. With Lance Armstrong's horrible press coverage over the last 8-10months, I'm sure it has affected sales of Trek Bikes. Is the release date more of a calculated tactic of 'damage control' by the author (and President of Trek Bikes), or is it just a coincidence? Who knows...
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on November 18, 2012
I read this book in one sitting. It is short and to the point which, by no means, lessens its impact. John Burke, president and CEO of Trek Bicycle tells the story of the life of his father, Richard Burke, Founder of Trek, from Trek's modest beginnings, through the company's early successes and failures, to his father's death. While the story has a large focus on the family-run business, it is the relationship between John Burke and his father and the lessons he taught that is the true subject matter.
John Burke writes an honest, sometimes funny, oftentimes heart-breaking portrayal of his father's final fight and the courage he showed throughout.
Very enjoyable!
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on January 14, 2014
I read this book because I'm a big fan of Trek bikes. I own several of them. The Trek story is an amazing story of how "the big guy" started a company from scratch and grew it into one of the worlds best and biggest bike companies, trumping the giants alone the way.
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on November 21, 2012
Read this book in one sitting in the corner of a little coffee shop in Hong Kong, far away from home and family. I created a top ten list for my kids on the spot. Great, thought provoking read. Really good stuff.
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on August 31, 2013
I wanted to read more about the beginning of Trek and what Dick did, but this book, while short, told so much more about a man who exemplified a good father. It wasn't by his own words, but through the mouth of one who mattered most as a father. . . His son.
John Burke takes us on a journey through much of the difficulty they faced in watching his father die but also shared some interesting stories about Trek and how some pivotal decisions were made.
Read this. . . You'll be glad you did.
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on March 11, 2013
I like Horatio Alger stories depicting those of modest means who achieve great success. That, along with Trek being in Wisconsin, brought me to the book. I would have like to have learned more from the author about the relationship between his parents. I was caught by surprised at off-handed disclosure of parental divorce (Catholics).

Among other surprises (toward the end of book) was his dad telling the priest that he didn't believe in god and then asking for last rites. Quite a contrast. His dad losing 30 pounds in mid-life (hopefully only fat) and participating in "extreme" events was very nice to read about.

But, with all respect, other than reading he ate "well" there were no specific details at all regarding his dietary. Zilch. Nothing. Too many, with little current optimal nutrition science, make the same claim.

It would have been nice to hear more about Trek's Amstrong ties and how the company felt about the latest revelations of systemic doping.

I also would have liked to know to what degree any "second opinions" were considered before beginning in a nightmare sequence of various operations. Did they believe these medical problems "just happened" and that no science-based alternatives exist well worth considering?

Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition

My Beef with Meat: The Healthiest Argument for Eating a Plant-Strong Diet--Plus 140 New Engine 2 Recipes

TPrevent and Reverse Heart Disease: The Revolutionary, Scientifically Proven, Nutrition-Based Curehere certainly are gems of inspiration throughout the book.

Forks Over Knives
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on November 19, 2012
You can just feel this story was written from the heart in the author's own words, in part John memorializes the lessons learned and values his father lived by for his children to read and understand. Here you have the story of Trek Bicycles, the good and the bad, a founder who is humble and never lets his success get the better of him. He always remained true to his own guiding principles. Frankly, we need more leaders like this in our society - we would be a better nation. Together, my wife and I try to instill the same values and character in my young son. I want him to read this book and I hope it makes a lasting impression.
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on November 19, 2012
I highly recommend this heartfelt and memorable book. Not only is it a quick and enjoyable read, it reminds us what really matters in life - family. The author's distinct voice and writing style is refreshingly different and REAL, and through his story about the life and death of his beloved (though not always easy) father, we can all learn how love for family is ultimately the greatest gift of all. This book makes a perfect holiday gift for anyone - fathers, sons, mothers, daughters - and especially readers who might enjoy an inside view of the business and/or cycling worlds.
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