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One More River to Cross: Black & Gay in America Paperback – December 29, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Anchor; Reprint edition (December 29, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385479832
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385479837
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #731,140 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Boykin, who is black and gay, came out of the closet in 1991 at age 25 while attending Harvard Law School, then went on to serve as special media assistant to President Clinton (1993-1994) as a liaison with the African American and homosexual communities. His important, bridge-building report stakes out common ground between blacks and gays, who share a burden of fighting oppression, negative stereotypes and internalized self-hatred. Boykin discovered an enormous amount of denial?both by heterosexual blacks who deny the existence of large numbers of black lesbians and gays, and by the white homosexual community, which, he says, excludes or patronizes African Americans, minimizing their contributions to the gay political movement and reinforcing straight society's prejudice. He constructively airs such issues as the black community's failure to address AIDS-related problems, the hostility gay interracial couples face, and the pervasive silence and denial concerning homosexuality by both Christian and Muslim ministers and congregations. Boykin is executive director of the National Black Gay and Lesbian Leadership Forum.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Political activist Boykin records the experiences of black lesbians and gay men in this report, exploring their interactions with the white gay and straight black communities.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 17, 1998
Format: Paperback
There is not enough discourse concerning the intersections and conflicts of black and homosexual america. This book does a great job at detailing these cross sections and differences. This book is best when we hear from the Boykin's personal memoirs and anecdotes. Stories about his gay uncle, his grandmother and his childhood wrestling buddy show the nuances of a developing black gay youth. The only problem with the book is that it compares homosexuality to blackness. This is not a problem in and of itself, however Boykin merely restates what is already known, without really bringing anything new to the table. Especially since these comparisons and contrasts have frequently been made. This book is strongest--and most interesting--when Boykin relates his personal childhood, educational and employment anecdotes. Boykin, a black gay Harvard Law graduate, occupies an unusual niche in America, his stories and perspective are bound to be insightful.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lerone Landis on June 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
Intelligent, inspiring and insightful are just 3 of the great "I" words that describe "One More River To Cross." Never before has a book dealt with the issues of being part of multiple minority groups in such an honest way. The combination of politics and a peak into Boykins personal life really make this book hard to put down. Not everyone will be able to relate and or agree directly to every point made in this book, even if they're exactly part of the subject matter. Even with that obstacle the highs and lows of life for a specific group of Americans (whom to often go unnoticed and unacknowledged)are still brought to the surface and told in a way that will enlighten all. A must read for anyone who is supposedly a "minority."
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
Reading Keith Boykins book "Black and Gay in America" gives insight to both, Non African American Gay persons and hetrosexuals of all race and gender, to the experiences and challenges of surving the dificulties of race and gender in the United States. After reading and sharing this book i'm convinced that it could be a useful tool in gaining greater insight about Black Gay Folks. As a African American Gay Man, I proud to have the opportunity to share such a well written, well documented, and thought provking book with persons regardless of race, gender or sexual orrientation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By steVando on November 19, 2008
Format: Paperback
Obviously this was written to the straight crowd to understand the points of view and lives of the Black male and the Gay Black male. Some gay reviewers were upset that they did not learn much, true but it helps put thing in perspective even for you Divas! For the feminist reviewers, well all i can say is no one can ever please a woman, especially the feminist ones. For the rapper: OK, he a clear dumb as* and probably did not have the attention span to get past the first pages, and what a shame! It is great for the white str8 guys and for the newbies at being gay and being black. Its a great review onto other gay books including the mediocre "On the Down-low". So, you will either love it, or hate it. No in betweens here. Buy it of course, and read the entire thing. Form your own opinion. DOnt be cheap and let these reviews make up your mind. i'd love to read what you had to say about it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By dr. b. on January 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
Keith Boykin's One More River to Cross offers a wonderful discussion on issues that arise with being African American and gay in today's society. He does a wonderful job of making relevant issues known and connects the African American struggle from Frederic Douglass to Audre Lorde's Zami. Read it, you'll love it.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By investigative reader on October 8, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Keith Boykin has a big chip on his shoulder, and it shows in his writing. He repeatedly confuses having affairs with being on the down low. Having an affair is one thing, especially if you are lesbian as lesbian sex is far safer than being a closeted married black male and having very risky, unprotected sex with gay men who don't use condoms, which carries a very high risk of STD and HIV exposure. Being on the down low means that one is engaging is high risk sex with a high risk population, not using protection, and then bringing diseases home to one's unsuspecting partner without being honest with her about the fact that you are actually gay, or bisexual. It isn't the same as having an affair. People who have affairs may be using condoms or practicing safe sex. Being on the down low is about having sex with high risk populations, not using condoms or protection, being secretive and dishonest with your partner, and bringing HIV to your spouse without telling her that you are a gay or bi male who doesn't want to use protection of any kind. It's about causing the fastest growing HIV population, Black women. Numbers don't lie. HIV is growing in Black straight women while other segments of the population are seeing decreasing incidence of HIV. Boykin just doesn't get it. He's still in denial, still not advocating safe sex, being honest with your partner, and letting go of the stigma that exists in African American people about being gay. There's such a stigma about being gay in Black America. It's not OK.
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