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One Nation Under Surveillance: A New Social Contract to Defend Freedom Without Sacrificing Liberty Hardcover – January 14, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0199580378 ISBN-10: 0199580375 Edition: 1st

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One Nation Under Surveillance: A New Social Contract to Defend Freedom Without Sacrificing Liberty + Understanding Privacy + Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff between Privacy and Security
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (January 14, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199580375
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199580378
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 1 x 6.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,198,106 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"A timely examination of the theory and practice of governmental surveillance...One Nation Under Surveillance is a cogent contribution to the growing body of post-9/11 literature examining contemporary political developments in tension with the fundamental values of political liberalism...a clear catalogue of the contemporary approaches to emergency power...a welcome addition to any library and will prove to be a valuable resource for students and researchers in the area. And, it is to be hoped, for our policymakers and 'deciders.'"--Journal of Law, Information & Science


"The author, a specialist in international law and globalisation, adeptly pulls key ideas from a morass of national security verbiage, while offering compelling stories and facts...Chesterman's book provides a selective field guide to some of the best that has been said about intelligence and national security strained through the author's experience and legal knowledge...The book brings greater depth and familiarity with theory and research than most journalistic efforts and more disciplinary breadth and human-interest material than most legal analyses."--Times Higher Education


"This book squarely faces the taboo subject of domestic privacy in an era of Islamist terrorism. Our enemies are not nation-states, so the targets of the intelligence services seeking to pre-empt terrorist attacks must be individuals. The casualty will be individual privacy. People will struggle against heightened surveillance, Chesterman notes, 'but the war will be lost.' A must-read for anyone interested in staying current about the privacy implications of the war on terror."--Frederick P. Hitz, former Inspector General, CIA


"This is an important book, breaking new ground in the sweep of its analysis, its analytical insights, and the policy implications it draws out. It shows just how often foreign and domestic intelligence gathering in the major democracies has been insensitive to public accountability, legality, and its consequences for individuals, to the detriment of both liberty and security--and how this can and must change. Simon Chesterman writes, as always, with compelling clarity and authority."--Gareth Evans, President Emeritus of the International Crisis Group and former Foreign Minister of Australia


"Simon Chesterman offers a clear, thoughtful, and incisive analysis of the long-standing tension between civil liberties, on the one hand, and security against threats to the polity, on the other hand. He takes a new tact on this old dilemma by probing into the question of what governments actually do with all the information they gather on their citizens. This is an interesting and provocative book."--Loch K. Johnson, Professor of Political Science, University of Georgia


"Simon Chesterman moves the debate on privacy beyond the question of whether the government and its intelligence services should have access to personal information to the realistic recognition that electronic transparency is here to stay. In a series of carefully articulated arguments, Chesterman outlines mechanisms that can hold governments accountable for the uses of that information. In so doing, he points the way to a twenty-first century rethinking of notions of privacy, security, and the laws that regulate them."--Karen J. Greenberg, Executive Director of the Center on Law and Security, New York University School of Law


About the Author


Simon Chesterman is Global Professor and Director of the New York University School of Law Singapore Program, and Vice Dean and Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore. His books include Shared Secrets, You, The People(OUP 2004), and Just War or Just Peace?(OUP 2001).

More About the Author

Professor Simon Chesterman is Dean of the National University of Singapore Faculty of Law. He is also Editor of the Asian Journal of International Law and Secretary-General of the Asian Society of International Law.

Educated in Melbourne, Beijing, Amsterdam, and Oxford, Professor Chesterman's teaching experience includes periods at the Universities of Melbourne, Oxford, Southampton, Columbia, and Sciences Po. From 2006-2011, he was Global Professor and Director of the New York University School of Law Singapore Programme.

Prior to joining NYU, he was a Senior Associate at the International Peace Academy and Director of UN Relations at the International Crisis Group in New York. He has previously worked for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in Yugoslavia and interned at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.

Professor Chesterman is the author or editor of twelve books, including "One Nation Under Surveillance" (OUP, 2011); "Law and Practice of the United Nations" (with Thomas M. Franck and David M. Malone, OUP, 2008); "You, The People" (OUP, 2004); and "Just War or Just Peace?" (OUP, 2001).

He is a recognized authority on international law, whose work has opened up new areas of research on conceptions of public authority -- including the rules and institutions of global governance, state-building and post-conflict reconstruction, and the changing role of intelligence agencies.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By William E. Liberatore TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a very eye-opening and interesting book about the steps taken by governments to "protect" us. It brings up many very interesting points.. such as how far should the government go to protect us? At what point is violating the rights of innocent people justifiable to catch the "bad" guys. The book talks about many things done by a couple of different governments, like the street cameras used in London, England and discusses their effectiveness. It does make one think that with the trends of surveillance and other intrusions into are private lives and information just how far is the government willing to go and just how far should we be willing to let them. Definitely worth the time to read. Hope you enjoy.
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