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One Of Our Aircraft Is Missing


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One Of Our Aircraft Is Missing + The Films of Michael Powell: A Matter of Life and Death (Stairway to Heaven) / Age of Consent
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Product Details

  • Actors: Peter Ustinov, Eric Portman
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Alpha Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: October 28, 2008
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001GNG31K
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #196,312 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

When the Nazis shoot down a British bomber, its crew seek help from the Dutch underground. An all time classic WWII epic.

Customer Reviews

Do not expect modern production values or special effects but for the time, both are quite good including a rather original crash scene.
nevadavet
Nothing against this film -- I am a fan of everything else I've seen by Powell and Pressburger and I expect I would at least enjoy this movie in other circumstances.
Sam Grindstaff
We get to know them as people and the Dutch as well, seeing that those involved in the struggle, both victim and liberator are real people escaping real evil.
John Tilelli MD

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
One of Our Aircraft Is Missing is proof that in some circumstances, especially in the hands of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, a wartime propaganda movie can still be a first class motion picture of lasting quality and interest. It was released in 1942 and was the first film Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger made after formalizing their partnership as The Archers. They took equal credit for writing, producing and directing. In 1941 they had collaborated on The 49th Parallel. In 1943 they would make The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, the first of a series of masterpieces they created in the Forties. In practice, Powell directed, Pressburger wrote and did most of the producing, and they closely collaborated on every aspect of their films.

The movie tells the story of the crewmen who bailed out of their bomber, B for Bertie, over The Netherlands in 1941. Even more, it tells the story of the Dutch men and women who endangered their own lives to give the crew shelter, to protect them and to pass them on to the North coast of Holland until rescue could be arranged. Please note that some elements of the plot are discussed.

Bertie, a two-engine bomber, is returning from a run over Stuttgart when it's hit by flak. The plane loses an engine but the crew nurse the plane along until the second engine stutters out over Holland. The six-man crew bail out. Five land together; one is missing.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 22, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
One of Our Aircraft Is Missing is a British propaganda film from 1941; leaving aside the propaganda aspects, it is a well-made motion picture that was nominated for best original screenplay as well as best special effects at the 1942 American Academy Awards (Casablanca took best picture). It also did quite well at the box office. The British bomber Bertie takes a hit during a nighttime bombing raid over Stuttgart, Germany, and her six-man RAF crew is forced to parachute to safety over German-occupied Dutch territory. Five of the men are discovered by some friendly children and are taken to town where an English-speaking schoolteacher helps facilitate their escape. The men are furtively passed along the sixty or so miles to the North Sea through a veritable underground railroad of Dutch resistance, eventually linking up with the pilot they feared had been lost. Interestingly, the most heroic assistance comes from women like the schoolteacher Els Mertens and the truly remarkable Jo de Vries. De Vries supposedly hates the British for having killed her husband in an air raid and works closely with the local German forces whom she secretly despises; this makes her the perfect final contact for the English airmen seeking to return home by sea. The final stages of the great escape do prove somewhat harrowing, but the RAF men do honor to the ancient creed of "being British" throughout the most dangerous moments. De Vries delivers a stirring ovation for the resistance and war efforts, and any Englishman or American who didn't already hate the Germans would have been more than willing to take up arms immediately and rush off to The Netherlands to free this remarkable woman and her friends in the Dutch resistance from Hitler's nefarious grip.Read more ›
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By John Tilelli MD on January 9, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
To those who do not know the genre, or are old enough to have contact with those who were there, this film is more than entertainment - it is instructional. The story is the (presumably true) tale of five british aviators who escaped from Nazi occupied Holland during WWII. They hide in lofts, cross dress and paddle down sewers to evade the crafty huns, with more than a little help from the natives. We get to know them as people and the Dutch as well, seeing that those involved in the struggle, both victim and liberator are real people escaping real evil. B&W suits this, and a pristine print would be, I think, disappointing. More than worth watching, it is inspiring - which I guess is the idea. Wait for the end soliloquy of the resistance woman who arranges the liberation of the aviators. She pretends by day to be a collaborator, but by night works for the resistance. During an air raid, in darkness from a second floor apartment, she hears the air raid sirens and watches from the window the Germans below scurrying to evade the bombs. Paraphraasing, she says, "Do you see that? Do you see them running like rats from your bombs? Do you think that we Dutch who threw the sea from our land would endure the Nazis? ..." Chilling stuff from a time of real heroes and villains. Don't pass this one up.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 9, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This war-time production by the Archers Studios and the famous writing/directing team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger is classic war time adventure. The crew of the British bomber, "B for Bertie" bails out over Nazi occupied Holland. The resistance finds the crew members and aids them in returning to England. Like their now out-of-print classic, 49th Parallel, the directorial team of Powell and Pressburger was assigned to make propaganda films to aid the war effort, what they produced were adventure epics. This film made such an impact that it was remade (presumably for the American audience) as Desperate Journey in 1942 with Errol Flyn and Ronald Reagan.
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