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One Pitch from Glory: A Decade of Running the Red Sox Hardcover – March 1, 2005

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Hall of Famer and award winner Lou Gorman has over 36 years of player personnel experience and 42 years in professional baseball. Presently, he is an executive consultant for the Boston Red Sox. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 229 pages
  • Publisher: Sports Publishing LLC; 1 edition (March 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159670067X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596700673
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,000,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I was disappointed in this book and thought it could have been a lot better. Gorman's heart is in the right place and he writes honestly, but without depth. The book needed a good editor. It contains redundencies, excessive/bland game by game detail/filler, and errors of grammar and fact. For example, former Sox player Larry Parrish is referred to as 'Lance' ; A's pitcher Storm Davis becomes 'Steve', Mike Greenwell becomes Mike Greenfield, and the trade that brought Nick Esasky and Rob Murphy to Boston refers to the Phillies (rather than the Reds).

If you are a diehard Sox fan looking for insight to the inner
workings of the team during Gorman's tenure, the book offers little of significance. Gorman leaves the reader wanting to know more. He discusses the Wade Boggs/Margo Adams scandal like an observer. Yet Ms. Adams frequently traveled with the team. Obviously the organization allowed this, but we don't find out any more about it. He mentions having negotiated with Bruce Hurst for over a year before he was 'devastated' when Hurst left as a free agent. Yet there is no discussion about the negotiations or what went wrong.

On the positive side, is is apparent that Gorman was a dedicated, hard working GM who loved the Sox and indeed brought them 'One Pitch From Glory' in what is one of the most difficult jobs in baseball- running the Red Sox. Gorman pegs much of the Boston baseball media exactly as many of them are - negative and miserable. He also opens the book strongly with an interesting (and still wrenching, despite the glory of 2004) behind the scenes look at the '86 World Series. I wish the rest of the book contained as much insider detail.

It is appropriate and pleasing to this reader that Gorman drank champagne the night the Sox finally won it all !
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Format: Hardcover
Lou Gorman was the general manager of the Red Sox for a decade. During his watch, the Sox came closer to winning the World Series than they had in decades. Unfortunately, he wasn't quite able to get it done. He presided over several playoff teams, and several truly awful teams. This book discusses both with equal candor, and looks to give a behind the scenes look at those seasons.

My one regret when reading this book is that I didn't remember enough about the teams Gorman was discussing. He did a great job of saying why he made the moves that he made. I just wish I knew more of the other side of the coin. When he says that he acquired Danny Darwin because he thought he would help the club, I don't know enough to say, "But you passed on so-and-so!" Which is really an important part of it. Was Frank Viola the best pitcher available? Or, did Gorman misread the market, or gloss over another player? Even with that drawback this was a wonderful read. It sometimes has a feeling of an apology. Or, at least an explanation. Why he did the Bagwell trade. Why injuries killed the team. Things like that. It was great to see the behind the scenes inter-workings of a GM. How did the signing of Jack Clark come to be? It's also interesting to read this now, after watching Theo and Company for so many years. Gorman was certainly from an older generation of GMs. He was much more people orientated than business. He also gave his all every season to win that championship. He didn't talk much about building an organization. He talked an awful lot, though, about winning for Jean Yawkey. It's an obvious difference, and makes for a great read.
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Format: Hardcover
I have been a member of Red Sox nation for over 30 years and and have been a clinical psychologist for the same duration. I found Lou Gorman's book fascinating from two major perspectives. First, his stories enlighten all of us to the rigors and joys of major league baseball, and especially but not limited to the Boston Red Sox. Secondly I think Lou is a psychologist in his own right, displaying uncanny understanding of the personalities of some of the most noted athletes that have ever worn a major league uniform. Lou's book teaches the reader that managing today's players demands baseball and psychological expertise. Lou Gorman clearly possesses both abilities. Arthur P. Ciaramicoli, Ed.D.,Ph.D.
Author of Performance Addiction
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you followed the Red Sox through that 1986 Baseball season you will love this book. This book is a must have for every Red Sox fan. It gave me new insight into a time during my childhood that made my heart both soar and sink. I relive everyone of those moments again with this book.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Lou Gorman does a great job .the book is very interesting and easy to follow..
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