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One Round Moon and a Star for Me Hardcover – October 1, 2004

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Atmospheric details particularize this affecting tale of a rural southern African boy whose mother has just given birth. The boy, narrating, begins with an expression of awe: "A falling star, Mama! Look how Papa catches it in his warm brown blanket. See how it slips into his silver milk bucket. 'A star for a new baby,' says Mama." After Papa proudly inspects the baby and announces, "I'm the baby's father," the older boy wonders, "Papa, are you really my papa too?" Papa reassures him, promising that another star will fall from the sky just for him. The use of native terms (a "tula-tula hush-hush song") and references to local practices (sticking two stalks of grass above the door to signify a birth; celebrating the new arrival by flooring the hut with fresh cow-dung) enhance this journey abroad. Daly's gently reverent pencil-and-watercolor illustrations reinforce Mennen's comforting depiction of a world where a boy might indeed catch a star in his palm, and where the special quality of each child is valued. Ages 4-7.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3-In this story set in rural South Africa, a young boy whose mother is expecting a new baby sees a falling star. He follows the moon and the sun across the sky and watches and participates in the traditions surrounding a birth unfold: putting stalks of grass above the door to warn men not to enter until "the inkaba-cord falls from the baby's belly"; makoties (young girls) bringing water for the baby; relatives bringing useful gifts. Finally, Papa comes and kneels to look at the infant. "'I'm the baby's father,'" he says with a smile. Later that night, he reassures his worried older son that he's his father, too. The spare, almost poetic text conveys the warmth and delight the boy finds in his world and his home, as well as the feelings of jealousy and concern that a new sibling brings. The pencil and watercolor illustrations further draw readers into the child's world and point of view. The use of pencil lines and shading to add detail and definition to the soft watercolors is especially skillful. This is an example of a multicultural picture book at its best, combining the universal and the particular while not skimping on quality or emotion.
Stephen Del Vecchio, Family Academy, New York City
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Frances Lincoln Publishers Ltd (October 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845070240
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845070243
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 8.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,988,552 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mvons on July 11, 2000
Format: Library Binding
Beautifully illustrated story of a new born and a the brother's feelings. Gave my child a view into another country's customs when a baby is born. There is only a sentence per page for those children who have a hard time sitting still being read to.
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By stacey on December 27, 2014
Format: Hardcover
This story found its way into our home as one of many in a compilation of bedtime stories. My daughter at 2 years old singled it out as THE ONE we must read, night after night, after night, after night, after night...I suppose if it were my choice which story to read hundreds (thousands) of times, I just might choose this story to be the one. Although it did take some time for me to appreciate it as I now do. Particularly the choice of words. Phrases like "see how he catches it in his warm brown blanket, look how it slips into his silver milk bucket" seemed awkward at first. Now that I am well acquainted with each character, every word seems to fit (my daughter has memorized the whole thing and objects if I improvise - or giggles if I overdo it, "One round Spoon, and a CAR...for me!!" no no no she says...). Many times I have asked her (now almost 4 years old) why she chooses this story every single night. It could be that she identifies with the boy who narrates since he experiences becoming an older sibling and perhaps she, like that little boy, questions her place in the family following the birth of the new baby. It took my daughter several readings to realize that the star at the end of the story was for the narrator himself, she thought for a while that he was going to catch it and take it to give to the new baby as a gift, similar to the first falling star and all the gifts that were brought to the baby throughout the story. I've always thought that the multicultural and emotional themes were a bit advanced for a child her age but she doesn't seem troubled by floors made of cow poop or thoughts of a heart that "feels dark like a night with no moon.Read more ›
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 10, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I bought this for my 2 1/2 yr old when she was becoming a big sister. I loved the illustrations in this book and I liked the African cultural themes. I wish the rest was as good. The child in this book worries that his dad is not his dad anymore after a new baby is born. The way the dad reassures the child is by pointing out that their hands look alike and the child's eyes look like mamas. My child has not expressed worries about whether we are still her parents and I don't want to bring up such a disturbing thought for her if it is not on her mind already. Also, as I look around me I see many families where parents and children have differently colored, textured, or shaped eyes, skin, or hair. I don't want to buy books that teach my child that having identical physical features is necessary to be a family.
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