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No One Waits for the Train Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 126 pages
  • Publisher: Alhambra Publishing; 1st edition (February 28, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 2874480118
  • ISBN-13: 978-2874480119
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,277,700 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Evocative at many levels of Waqas Khwaja's chosen literary ancestors such as Baba Farid, Bulle Shah, Kabir, and Nanak, No One Waits for the Train is a soulful meditation on the 1947 partition of British India. Khwaja's poetry captures in image, narrative voice, and personal memory the terrible beauty of an innocence now lost, of a train that never arrives, of a platform strewn with bodies, of a pain that never ends, and a love in the valley that endures." Amritjit Singh, Langston Hughes Professor of African-American Literature, Ohio University --Blurb, back cover of the book<br /><br />"This is poetry with a conscience, language with a heart, intellect shining through emotions. With these poems, Khwaja has gone into the darkness of partition, and drawn from its violent, festering core that which can make it bearable: the stinging balm of memory and its partial but hopeful promise of cure through painful ministrations." Deepika Petraglia-Bahri, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of English, and Director South Asian Studies, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. --Blurb, back cover of the book

"Evocative at many levels of Waqas Khwaja's chosen literary ancestors such as Baba Farid, Bulle Shah, Kabir, and Nanak, No One Waits for the Train is a soulful meditation on the 1947 partition of British India. Khwaja's poetry captures in image, narrative voice, and personal memory the terrible beauty of an innocence now lost, of a train that never arrives, of a platform strewn with bodies, of a pain that never ends, and a love in the valley that endures." Amritjit Singh, Langston Hughes Professor of African-American Literature, Ohio University --Blurb, back cover of the book

About the Author

Waqas Khwaja is Associate Professor and Chair of the English Department at Agnes Scott College. In addition to the present volume, he has published two collections of poetry, Six Geese from a Tomb at Medum (1987) and Mariam's Lament (1991), a literary travelogue, Writers and Landscapes (1991), and two anthologies of Pakistani Literature in translation, Mornings in the Wilderness (1988) and Short Stories from Pakistan (1991). He was a practicing lawyer and visiting professor of law in Pakistan before he migrated to the United States in 1994 and took up an academic career in literature.

More About the Author

Dr. Waqas Khwaja is Professor of English and Postcolonial Studies at Agnes Scott College, where he teaches courses in Victorian and Romantic poetry, Narratives of Empire, Gothic literature, Postcolonial Studies, and Creative Writing. He has a Ph.D. in English Literature from Emory University, Atlanta, and LL.B. from Punjab University, Lahore, Pakistan, in addition to an honorary fellowship from the International Writing Program, University of Iowa. He has published three collections of original poetry, No One Waits for the Train (2007), Six Geese from a Tomb at Medum (1987), and Mariam's Lament (1992), a literary travelogue Writers and Landscapes (1991) about his experiences with the International Writers Program, University of Iowa, and three anthologies of Pakistani literature in translation, Cactus (1986), Mornings in the Wilderness (1988) and Short Stories from Pakistan (1991). He was the translation editor (and contributing translator) for Modern Poetry of Pakistan (2011), a National Endowment of the Arts project, showcasing the work of 44 prominent Pakistani poets from its seven major language traditions. A regular columnist for and contributor to The Frontier Post, The Pakistan Economic Review, The Pakistan Times, News International, The Nation, and The Friday Times between 1983 and 1992, he was a practicing lawyer and visiting professor of law in Pakistan before he emigrated to the U.S. in 1994 to pursue an academic career in literature. He has published scholarly articles on writers from a variety of linguistic and cultural traditions and on subjects as wide-ranging as literature and economics, history, culture, and politics. He has guest-edited a special issue on Pakistani Literature for the Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, released in February 2011, and has contributed numerous scholarly articles to academic journals and publications.

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