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One Woman, One Vote


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Frequently Bought Together

One Woman, One Vote + Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony + Iron Jawed Angels
Price for all three: $36.82

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Product Details

  • Actors: Susan Sarandon
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: PBS
  • DVD Release Date: February 28, 2006
  • Run Time: 106 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000E3LGTC
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,784 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

How could America call itself the world's greatest democracy, but continue to deny the right to vote to more than half of its citizens? This program documents the struggle which culminated in the passing of the 19th Amendment in the U.S. Senate by one vote. Witness the 70-year struggle for women's suffrage. Discover why the crusaders faced entrenched opposition from men and women who feared the women's vote would ignite a social revolution.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

82 of 84 people found the following review helpful By Jeffery Mingo on March 24, 2006
PBS already produced a DVD about Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. I was worried that this would be a rehash. However, it looked at the suffrage movement with these leaders, but not only these leaders.

I think it's great that this work showed that more than just two women were responsible for the women's vote. This gives budding feminists more biographies to find and write. Because the Amendment had to be ratified by 2/3 of states, there is also room for history graduate students to describe what their states did in this regard. I liked that Susan Sarandon narrated this. If male actors (Morgan Freeman, Liam Neeson, Harvey Fierstein, etc.) can be narrators, then so should actresses.

Many modern documentaries have people dressed up in costumes imitating the sequences of events. This work refrains from doing that. It shows photos and films (yes, films!) from the times. Otherwise, it would use objects to represent deceased people. Thus, eyeglasses on a book stand in for Cady Stanton; the paintings in the Senate stand for the 99 men in office at the time. This film is filled with jingoes and ditties from the time. They are poignant, but a bit corny. But hey, rock'n'roll wasn't invented until 30 years after the fact.

This film reiterates how some men have absurd notions that anti-sexism will turn the world upside down. In the same way that ERA opponents said a law would lead to unisex bathrooms, this film showed men washing clothes and caring for children (Heavens forfend!) as reasons not to support the vote. In the same way that Limbaugh rants about "feminazis," this film shows Charlie Chaplin (the supposed Communist) mocking suffragettes.

Very importantly, this film shows how racist First Wave feminism was.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By amazonian chick on February 11, 2008
This documentary brings viewers in to the spirit of the suffrage movement and puts the movement into a culturally, historically, politically, and socially specific context of the U.S. and Britain in the latter half of the 19th Century into the early 20th Century.

Although sometimes it seems cheesy, with purposefully bourgeois voices and old-fashioned sets to set the mood, the documentary is surprisingly fast-paced, revealing how dynamic the movement was, with numerous events and leaders continually making progress. However, this can be confusing to students.

Students may bore if watching this full-length video. I recommend either breaking in the middle of it or choosing only a few chapters to show, while filling in the rest of the time-line with lecture. It's hard to determine which parts are most important, but how some of the 1st Wave feminists were racist is an important piece.

The documentary uses Susan Sarandon as the spokesperson and uses Stanton and Anthony's letter-writing as a woman-centered perspective of woman suffrage.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 26, 2011
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I ordered this at the same time I ordered "Iron Jawed Angels" with Hilary Swank.
This video is far better and more interesting unless you like hype, soapy drama, out of period music and dialog.
This is more like something Ken Burns would do, and the photos, accuracy, and historical timeline are a lot easier to follow than the "...Angels" drama.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Kath in CO on December 25, 2010
Verified Purchase
Well-organized, "watchable" overview of the struggle for women's suffrage in the U.S. from 1848 to 1920. Excellent use of photos, film footage, and songs to tell the stories of women who led the fight, the political and social issues of their times, and the various tactics they used.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By cynthia on March 2, 2010
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This movie reminds us of the sacrifice our sisters made to secure the vote. It is too easy to forget what it takes to change an institution, to change a country. Thank you, women of the suffrage movement.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mary J. Morris on January 8, 2013
Verified Purchase
Every woman in American needs to see this documentary so they can appreciate their right to vote and honor and appreciate what their ancestors went through to give it to them. A must for students in American History Classes
Mary
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