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Only Everything

David SanbornAudio CD
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)

Price: $11.88 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

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Song Title Time Price
listen  1. The Peeper 3:43$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Only Everything (For Genevieve) 8:01$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Hard Times 5:01$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Let The Good Times Roll [feat. Joss Stone] 3:04$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Baby Won't You Please Come Home 8:02$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  6. You've Changed 6:03$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Hallelujah I Love Her So [feat. James Taylor] 3:58$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  8. Blues In The Night 7:52$0.99  Buy MP3 


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Biography

DAVID SANBORN – ONLY EVERYTHING BIO

“Among the great saxophonists of the past four decades,” says one Rolling Stone writer, “David Sanborn has earned an identity all his own. He’s jazz, he’s funk, he’s soul, he’s pop, he’s blues, he’s rock. Most remarkably, he excels in each of these genres with a voice that is both forceful and ... Read more in Amazon's David Sanborn Store

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (January 26, 2010)
  • Original Release Date: 2010
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Decca
  • ASIN: B002ZHIPSK
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #157,217 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

About the Artist

"Among the great saxophonists of the past four decades," says one Rolling Stone writer, "David Sanborn has earned an identity all his own. He's jazz, he's funk, he's soul, he's pop, he's blues, he's rock. Most remarkably, he excels in each of these genres with a voice that is both forceful and tender, sensuous and subtle."

With Only Everything, the second of Sanborn's homage to the aesthetic of Ray Charles, he revisits his roots with fresh perspective. The New York Times called David's 2008 Here and Gone, the first of his tribute series, "a disarming delight." He returns to this territory with renewed passion.

"If anyone would ask me what Ray--or Ray's musicians--meant to me, my answer might be, `only everything," says David. "As a concept, Only Everything, is about gratitude. I'm grateful not only for the musical life I've been able to live, but the original sources of inspiration that continue to inform and excite me fifty years after encountering them."

The seminal encounter in the musical life of Sanborn happened in 1956 when he was 11.

"My dad took me to Kiel Auditorium," he remembers, "an indoor arena that housed the St. Louis Hawks during the basketball season and, at other times, big band concerts. This was Ray's little band, my first time to hear him in person. I already knew him from records like "I Got A Woman," "Drown In My Own Tears" and "Night Time (Is the Right Time)." Those songs had fired my imagination. But his live performance transformed me. He sang with a passion I had never before experienced. Although they were pop hits, his songs were soaked in the blues. Beyond the authority of his voice and the spark of his electric piano, two additional forces from Ray's world took hold of me and, to this day, have not let go. The first was Hank Crawford and the second was David `Fathead' Newman, the band's two star saxophonists. Hank and Fathead each had his own voice that, though distinct, was closely linked to Ray's. It was the voice of pain, joy, release, and relief. Both Hank and Fathead had a mixture of deep-country blues, sanctified gospel, and big-city jazz. The message of this music came across like lightning--get a saxophone."

Sanborn got a saxophone and a voice of his own. Along with a handful of other alto players in the history of the instrument--Benny Carter, Johnny Hodges, Earl Bostic, Charlie Parker, Cannonball Adderley, Paul Desmond--Sanborn's sound is instantly recognizable. His musical voice is deeply human, a cry of both pain and celebration.

"When I make a record," he explains, "I look for a core sound," he explains, "and use it as a unifying source, the aural center of the record. On Only Everything, my producer Phil Ramone, who also produced Here and Gone, agreed that the sound was Joey DeFrancesco's organ. For my money, Joey is the ruling monarch of the Hammond B3. His mastery of the instrument is complete. But more than a technically remarkable player, Joey has a feeling that's unparalleled. No one grooves harder, yet no one relaxes deeper. While this is my first recording date with Joey, I've been teaming with Steve Gadd for years, a remarkable drummer who plays in service of the music. He colors his drum tones with subtlety, pushing us forward even as he lays back."

Sanborn sees the first three songs on Only Everything as the definitive building blocks of the record.

"`The Peeper' is my tribute to Hank Crawford," he explains. "Hank wrote, recorded, and considered this his signature song. I was 17 when I heard `The Peeper' on Hank's From The Heart, an album I loved so much that I placed it under my pillow and took to bed. On his early solo sessions, Hank fronted Ray's band but without Ray himself. The absence of a keyboard gave Hank a startling kind of presence. He jumped off the vinyl and played in your face. On Only Everything, I wanted to revisit that attitude with fresh ideas."

"Only Everything," a Sanborn original making its debut on record, feels like a timeless soul ballad from the fifties. "It's dedicated to my first grandchild Genevieve," says Sanborn. "I think of the song as something that might have been played by the masters who impacted me--gutsy like Lockjaw Davis and Gene Ammons. It's blues-based, but then, again, I'm blues-based. I believe it was Mose Allison who said there are two kinds of songs--blues and everything else. For me, blues-based music is, once again, only everything."

When asked about "Hard Times," the song that famed producer Jerry Wexler called "Fathead Newman's alto-articulated theme, a haunting anthem still being played at righteous blues bars throughout the land," David breaks into a broad smile.

"I heard `Hard Times' on a jukebox when I was 14," says Sanborn, "It had just come out on Newman's first album, Ray Charles Presents Fathead. I was stunned. When I listened to how Fathead told his story with such eloquence and grace, I knew that I would never to able to play anything so simple and yet complex. At that moment I realized I was listening to poetry."

Sanborn has enjoyed a long succession of successful encounters with vocalists--from David Bowie to Linda Ronstadt to Little Jimmy Scott. Only Everything highlights two. The first is with Joss Stone whose salty reading of Ray Charles' "Let the Good Times Roll" is riveting. The song was recorded in the forties by Louis Jordan, one of Charles' heroes, but it is Charles' version on the seminal The Genius Of Ray Charles that is considered definitive. Gil Goldstein's arrangement echoes the one Quincy Jones wrote for the original Ray record in 1959.

"Joss is a young woman with an old soul," says David. "She's a force of nature who understands the primal power of soul music. This is our second meeting. On Here and Gone, she sang Ray's `I Believe To My Soul,' a dark song of murderous intensity. This time I wanted Joss to express the pure delight of Ray's sensuous side. She did so brilliantly."

Dizzy Gillespie once said that Ray's ballad tempos are so slow you can walk around the block between beats. Sanborn assigns such a tempo to "Baby Won't You Please Come Home," a profound lament.

"Around the same time Ray was molding my understanding of music," David remembers, "Miles also had a tremendous impact on me. I heard his Seven Steps To Heaven when I was a teenager. With Victor Feldman on piano, Miles did a version of `Baby Won't You Please Come Home' that cut through me like knife."

In the fifties and early sixties, Miles was courageously embracing what some consider out-of-date songs and making them new. By discovering their emotional core, he reinvented them. In that regard, he and Ray shared a common genius for transforming the mundane to the miraculous. Sanborn does much with "You've Changed."

"I associate the song with Little Jimmy Scott," says David, "one of Ray's favorite singers."

In fact, Ray, who rarely produced any artist other than himself, produced Scott's brilliant Falling In Love Is Wonderful album in 1962. Jimmy also sang a searing "For All We Know" on David's 1995 Pearls album. The version of "You've Changed" that Sanborn references is from Scott's little-known 1975 Savoy record Can't We Begin Again. Like Jimmy, David is a balladeer of idiosyncratic angst.

"He doesn't play the sax," Scott once said about Sanborn, "he sings through the sax. Me and David, man, we relate to each other as singers."

On the subject of singers, Miles Davis once said that James Taylor "sings like he's blind." The observation is especially apt in describing the Taylor/Sanborn rendition of Ray Charles' "Hallelujah I Love Her So."

"James told me that he performed it early in his career," says David, "and sent me a simple demo of just voice and guitar. It was wonderfully relaxed, and I knew that's the feel we had to keep in the studio. James kept the feel. He told the story--like he tells all his stories--with a warm naturalness that beats back the blues."

It took Ray Charles some 30 years to record "Blues In the Night." When he sang it in 1979 on an album entitled Ain't It So, he said, "Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer were motherfuckers. When they came up with `Blues in the Night,' they came up with one of the baddest blues ballads ever. I heard everyone do it from Woody Herman to Artie Shaw to Rosie Clooney. I always wanted to do it but it took me a long time to find a way to get under it. I finally figured out that it had to do with tempo. I needed to slow the shit down--way down."

Sanborn figured out the same thing. His interpretation of the Arlen/Mercer motif, like all of Only Everything, is another passionate reexamination of the blues. And when David Sanborn reexamines the blues, he reignites his spirit, his source, his sense of wonder and mystery. With unrestrained heart and soul, he reinvents the music of which he is an indisputable master.

Product Description

Among the great saxophonists of the past four decades, says one Rolling Stone writer, David Sanborn has earned an identity all his own. He s jazz, he s funk, he s soul, he s pop, he s blues, he s rock. Most remarkably, he excels in each of these genres with a voice that is both forceful and tender, sensuous and subtle. With Only Everything, the second of Sanborn s homage to the aesthetic of Ray Charles, he revisits his roots with fresh perspective. The New York Times called David s 2008 Here and Gone, the first of his tribute series, a disarming delight. He returns to this territory with renewed passion. If anyone would ask me what Ray or Ray s musicians meant to me, my answer might be, only everything, says David. As a concept, Only Everything is about gratitude. I m grateful not only for the musical life I ve been able to live, but the original sources of inspiration that continue to inform and excite me fifty years after encountering them. The seminal encounter in the musical life of Sanborn happened in 1956 when he was 11. My dad took me to Kiel Auditorium, he remembers, an indoor arena that housed the St. Louis Hawks during the basketball season and, at other times, big band concerts. This was Ray s little band, my first time to hear him in person. I already knew him from records like I Got A Woman, Drown In My Own Tears and Night Time (Is the Right Time). Those songs had fired my imagination. But his live performance transformed me. He sang with a passion I had never before experienced. Although they were pop hits, his songs were soaked in the blues. Beyond the authority of his voice and the spark of his electric piano, two additional forces from Ray s world took hold of me and, to this day, have not let go. The first was Hank Crawford and the second was David Fathead Newman, the band s two star saxophonists. Hank and Fathead each had his own voice that, though distinct, was closely linked to Ray s. It was the voice of pain, joy, release, and relief. Both Hank and Fathead had a mixture of deep-country blues, sanctified gospel, and big-city jazz. The message of this music came across like lightning get a sax. Sanborn got a sax and a voice of his own. Along with a handful of other alto players in the history of the instrument Benny Carter, Johnny Hodges, Earl Bostic, Charlie Parker, Cannonball Adderley, Paul Desmond Sanborn s sound is instantly recognizable. His musical voice is deeply human, a cry of both pain and celebration. When I make a record, he explains, I look for a core sound, he explains, and use it as a unifying source, the aural center of the record. On Only Everything, my producer Phil Ramone, who also produced Here and Gone, agreed that the sound was Joey DeFrancesco s organ. For my money, Joey is the ruling monarch of the Hammond B3. His mastery of the instrument is complete. But more than a technically remarkable player, Joey has a feeling that s unparalleled. No one grooves harder, yet no one relaxes deeper. While this is my first recording date with Joey, I ve been teaming with Steve Gadd for years, a remarkable drummer who plays in service of the music. He colors his drum tones with subtlety, pushing pushes us forward even as he lays back.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
(10)
3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A re-hash of "Here and Gone" January 27, 2010
Format:Audio CD
It is true that David Sanborn has a unique and instantly recognizable sound. He is without doubt the most influential alto saxophonist of the last three decades. His 25th studio release is much anticipated-yet it doesn't break any new ground for Sanborn. Here and Gone, Sanborn's 24th release (released in 2008) and "Only Everything" are dedicated to Ray Charles and his band of the 50s and 60s. Both releases have tribute songs (and remakes of) David Fathead Newman (tenor sax of Ray Charles' fame), Hank Crawford (alto Sax of Ray Charles fame), and Ray Charles music. Both CDs are heavily influenced by the jazz and blues side of the spectrum. Both CDs feature some of the same artists (Joss Stone and Phil Ramone for two examples). While this will please many jazz saxophonists, much of Sanborn's influence has been when he has stepped outside of the traditional blues and jazz end of the spectrum, and worked with such greats as Eric Clapton, Marcus Miller, Stevie Wonder etc. who have been more on the R&B/rock side of the spectrum. While many jazz enthusiasts were pleased with Sanborn returning to the roots of Jazz with his 2008 release "Here and Gone", others who enjoyed the more contemporary end of Sanborn's playing, missed his more modern ideas in his music.

If you are a jazz enthusiast at heart, you will enjoy this CD. If you enjoyed "Here and Gone", you would enjoy this CD too, as stylistically and musically, they are the same. If you have followed Sanborn throughout his long career, since his "Beck and Sanborn" and "Taking Off" releases of 1975, you will know that typically each Sanborn release is different from previous ones. For example, "A Change of Heart" (80s fusion) is different from "Another Hand" (Free Jazz). While I still enjoy the CD, and I do recommend it, I do miss some of the stylistic versatility of Sanborn, and wish this release was not a rehash of the same ideas and styles of his previous release.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars NOT QUITE>>>>> February 8, 2010
By david c
Format:Audio CD
Great concept--great song selection--great band. So why not more stars? Mr Sanborn plays with as much passion as ever, but I'm afraid not quite with his customary technical mastery. Maybe it's age, but his articulation is not what it was and there are a few too many glitches in his solos--especially when he double times. Having said that, this is a fine album and one has to give Sanborn credit for taking chances.. I'd have liked a guitar in the mix--oh for Eric Gale if he were still with us. His unique jazz/blues style would have been perfect for this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing! December 15, 2013
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
This album embodies everything I love about jazz. Superb soloing both by David and by Joey DeFrancesco on organ. The guest appearance by James Taylor is a special treat.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars smoking September 18, 2012
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
joey on the hammond b3 makes this record. here and now is good and peterson is a good pianoist but defrancsco is the most from coast to coast on that b3 man.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still chasin' Sanborn January 29, 2010
Format:Audio CD
I've been groovin' to the new Davisanborn CD in the car this week as I've been driving around. I like it a lot. So many things about Dave's playing are fantastic -- the great dynamic variation, the inventiveness in improvisation, the fire and power in the notes. I preferred the instrumental tracks to those with vocals. Both singers did pretty well with their songs, it's just not what I was looking for here. (Despite being a JT fan, I came to this album wanting to hear David Sanborn, and the singing by Mr Taylor and Joss Stone detracted from that.) Those instrumental cuts are full of goodness, though, especially the organ solos by Joey DeFrancesco. I kept thinking that anybody who had Mr Sanborn pegged as just a Smooth Jazz guy back in the '80s ought to hear his current music. This is some hot straight-ahead horn blowing! I did have just a bit of a problem with the overuse of the backing horn section, though. Occasionally the horns were so prevalent I started thinking I was listening to a Big Band record, and I'm not a Big Band kind of person. (This was also a problem on his last CD, Here and Gone.)
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