Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Grocery Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage AutoRip in CDs & Vinyl Shop Now Deal of the Day

Ontological Engineering: with examples from the areas of Knowledge Management, e-Commerce and the Semantic Web. First Edition (Advanced Information and Knowledge Processing)

7 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1852335519
ISBN-10: 1852335513
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Try the eTextbook for free
$0.00
Buy used
$10.96
Buy new
$131.14
More Buying Choices
31 New from $43.74 18 Used from $9.95

InterDesign Brand Store Awareness Rent Textbooks

Editorial Reviews

From the Author

We strongly recommend this book for anyone who wants to have the most updated state of the art on Ontological Engineering, covering also the practical aspects of selecting and applying methodologies, languages, and tools for building ontologies. This book is recommended for researchers, postgraduates, practitioners, libraries, institutions, industry, scientists, students

About the Author

Dr Ascuncion Gomez Perez is Associate Professor at the Computer Science School at Universidad Politecnica De Madrid, Spain. Since 1995 she has lectured a Ph.D. course on ontologies at the Artificial Intelligence Department at UPM. Her current research activities include, among others: Ontological Engineering, Knowledge Management on the web and Electronic Commerce.

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Advanced Information and Knowledge Processing
  • Hardcover: 415 pages
  • Publisher: Springer (July 22, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852335513
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852335519
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,802,582 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
0%
4 star
86%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
14%
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Lee D. Carlson HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The word `ontology' is usually associated with philosophical speculation on the reality of things, and if one checks the literature on philosophy one will find a diverse number of opinions on this reality. Engineers and scientists typically view philosophical musings on any topic as being impractical, and indulging oneself in these musings will cause one to lose sight of the topic or problem at hand. Rather than simplify the problem and make it understandable, philosophy tends in most cases to complicate it by endless debate on definitions and the use of sophisticated rhetoric that seems to have no bearing on the problem at hand. The conceptual spaces generated by these debates can become gigantic and therefore unwieldy, thus making the problem appear more complex than it actually is.

In the information age however, ontology has become a word that has taken on enormous practical significance. Business and scientific research are both areas that have increasingly relied on information technology not only to organize information but also to analyze data and make accurate predictions. In addition, financial constraints have forced many businesses to automate most of their internal processes, and this automation has brought about its own unique challenges. This push to automation usually involves being able to differentiate one thing from another, or one collection of data from another, or one concept from another. Thus one needs to think about questions of ontology, and this (very practical) need has brought about the rise of the field of `ontological engineering', which is the topic of this book.

The authors have given a good general overview of the different approaches to the creation of ontologies.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By S. Nilakanta on February 17, 2005
Format: Hardcover
There are several chapters that I liked and found very useful. The first chapter on theoretical foundations has been well written. Parsing through the various definitions of Ontology has been an educating experience. The other chapters, especially the ones describing the methodologies and languages are very informative. It may not be exhaustive but for a beginner, these chapters give a good overview.

I was disappointed only when I learnt that the book will not cover Ontology learning tools. The author argues for limiting the scope of the book. I feel the book would have been more valuable had it contained at least an overview of the learning tools!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By W Boudville HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 8, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The book shows progress in how ontologies are defined from various data sets. The subject is a natural field of artificial intelligence, in attempting to automated this filling of an ontology. Various example ontologies are presented, along with the markup languages like RDF and OWL in which these are expressed. The progress is visible, inasmuch as just a few years ago, these languages were devised. Now we see non-trivial ontology constructions using them. Good.

A large portion of the book describes the acute problem of somehow extracting meaning in a programmatic manner from data. Because the manual making of an ontology simply does not seem to scale, given the realities of gigabyte databases. We see that there is a natural decomposition of the problem into a linguistic step and a conceptual step. The former is tied to a particular human language. The latter is the nut of the problem. Current methods look promising, but are certainly not the last word.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By siliconexec on April 11, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The subject of this book is incredibly relevant to today's world of information management. The chapters are presented in a logical and informative way, though some of the book only skims the surface or barely touches on significant developments, tools, and problems. Overall, I found the text too theoretical, with insufficient ties to messy real-world issues.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: ai