Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on April 13, 2012
Let me start by saying, I love Starbucks. I drink their coffee every morning, stop by a store multiple times a week and think they have the best retail for the iPhone. Having shared that, I'd only give the book 3 of 5 stars and it would be 2 if I didn't like Starbucks so much. The book was too long and shared too much detail on every little aspect of the company's turnaround. I also got bored of all the trite descriptions of people I thought Howard Schultz doesn't really know. There we too many descriptions like this, "Bill is an athletic man who runs marathons and applies the same diligence he uses in training to brewing the perfect cup of coffee." I really started getting bored with the book so when I hit chapter 33 I flipped to the table of contents to see how much more I had to go and was quite relieved to see that was the last chapter. However, after reading "I think I'm at my best as a leader when..." I decided to just skip the chapter. While Starbucks seems like a wonderful place to work there was so much promoting of that fact that it made Schultz seem boastful and the last chapter confirmed that for me. Also, I had a real problem learning they spent $30 million on a manger retreat as they were closing stores and laying off people. Even in they did help in New Orleans I'm sure that didn't sit well with "partners" who were losing their jobs.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 22, 2012
First, this was a well-written book. I have to say that it was an enjoyable read, but it didn't fully meet my needs. I'm not a huge Starbucks fan (I'm just not a big coffee drinker). I'm a grad student flirting with entrepreneurship, so I was looking at this book with a surgical eye.
What appealed to me: The passage about his biologist/chemist colleague who tinkered with different instant coffee formulas (I can't help it. I'm biased!), learning of Starbucks' philanthropy (had no idea) and how Schultz turned the company around (this piqued my interest).
But, I did a lot of skimming... A LOT. Maybe it wasn't fluff for the ardent Starbucks fan, but it was for me. The take away message: remain passionate, don't grow too quickly, think outside the box and give back. I didn't need 350 pages to get that message.
The best chapters, IMO, were 27-Innovate, 28- Conviction, 29- Connecting Dots and 30-Balance
On the whole, I came away liking Schultz and the Starbucks brand. His passion is palpable and it saved his company. Whenever I'm in the mood for coffee, I know where I'll get it. I just won't buy a second Starbucks book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
20 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on March 30, 2011
As any Starbucks customer can tell you, the experience of walking into the well-known coffee shop is a delight to the senses. From the delicious scent of freshly ground coffee and the sight of appetizing treats behind the glass, to the cheerful greeting from the barista behind the counter, the store invites you to not only feed your appetite but also sooth your soul.

Now Howard Schultz has presented us with an inside look at the craftsmanship and sincere passion for excellence that have gone into creating this delectable experience. Onward takes the reader from Howard's decisions to return to his position as CEO and forward through the sometimes-agonizing task of finding the perfect balance between product quality, core values and profit.

Told in an earnest and detailed way, Howard's personal account of his leadership role in the company and the many crucial decisions that have gone into making it the icon that it is today makes for an inspiring look at true leadership and transformation!
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 12, 2013
A fairly young executive who is a master of PR has managed to sell a second self directed biography. While it is of some interest to stockholders, it is really a little too much to read a second Howard Schultz self promoting bio.
He stepped aside on reaching a great success, but the truth is that he was still the puppet master in his "hands off" role. The company and its stock were in a downward spiral when Howard rode to the rescue. He did indeed turn the declining company around but did he really need to commission a new book about his Phoenix like rise from the ashes?
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on April 4, 2011
When everyone around him saw failing numbers and a bleak future, Howard Schultz saw possibility and potential. Onward is the telling of just how clearly he saw all that Starbucks could be and his very personal journey to achieve it.

Like any entrepreneur, Howard wanted this business to be profitable, but he also wanted Starbucks to stand for strong values and impeccable quality not only to the customers, but also to his partners, employees and the community. This involved many changes including breaking bad habits and forming better ones and finding ways to improve in many areas that not only met customer expectations, but exceeded them.

I really enjoyed reading about how all this was accomplished and I was truly inspired by the sense of teamwork and resolve shown by all involved.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on May 11, 2011
NYC was too small for both Howard Shultz and Donald Trump's egos. If he eliminated the sentences starting with the word "I" it would be many, many less pages. My mistake was that I did not read the negative posts before I bought it. He explains his reasons for providing health care for all his employees, because of his father's loss of both his health and his job at the same time, and late in his life. But I never saw an employee working in Starbucks older than 50. To his credit, he has built and operated a very large and successful company, but the egotism spoiled it for me.
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on April 4, 2011
Onward is insightful and compelling. This book spotlights the spirit of innovation and success that is the hallmark of great leadership as seen through the eyes of Howard Schultz, the CEO of Starbucks. In this first person account we see the trials and troubles that he faced both from economic turmoil and at times even betrayal from within the company. Through it all he carries with him the ideals and image he wants to see achieved and impresses them on everyone involved. It was a great read and carried a very motivating message for anyone in leadership.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I really liked the first Starbux book Pouring Your Heart and was excited to see this one come out (at actual Starbux stores I think?).
I didn't know that this book was about the slight dip in growth and stuff that Starbux experienced a few years back (which every business was feeling I think so was it really that unique to Starbux?) and man I'll tell you that the length of this book kind of made it tough for me to get through and also the subject matter wasn't as great as the first book.
I think it's important to not lose sight of who you are as a company but man, I think it could've been written about in a better, entertaining and really a lot shorter of a book.
But it's always great to get a look into the company that has dominated most of my adult life (that and Microsoft and Apple I think) and learn more about what makes them tick. I don't think there's that much I can apply to my life since I'm not dominating the world and am not really the person most responsible for the values and culture in my various jobs. I am really curious how your contract changes when you return to such a well-known company like Starbux though and what everyone involved learned about that person and things like that (just like Apple too).
I'm trying to figure out what this means to me personally so that's a good thing but I do realize why most of my friends haven't heard or read this book even a couple of years after the fact.
It's not a definite book that I think everyone should read but a good book if you happen to read it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
This book is written by the president of Starbucks Coffee Company.
This product is very simple to send in the market, but it doesn't simple to make buy it from the global people.
Starbucks in fact is a global brand, in a sense that it is achieved by the people of the all world.
In the book there are some facts those could reveal particolar aspects of the production.
But the typical back-ground is that of social networks, whom determine the rules of the market.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 23, 2011
Howard Schulz writes with incredible passion and sincerity in this, his second book. The flow of the read is helped by his collaboration with former Forbes journalist Gordon, but the really compelling element of this book comes from Schulz' transparency in depicting Starbucks transformation during the last five years. He could have easily made this book one big PR job (like so many of these books are), but, instead, he presents real problems and the real, often complicated, solutions employed to solve them.

In 2000, Schultz left the helm at Starbucks to focus on spreading the coffee products to other nations, especially China. He was comfortable with his immediate successor, chosen from inside Starbucks, but the next CEO left a bad taste in Schulz mouth. The quality of the product and the service began to drop and the company's financial growth stagnated. Alarmed, Schultz decided to return for a second act as CEO in 2007. This book tells the story of what happened from 2007 to 2010. The detail is immense, and Schulz is brazenly honest about the difficult decisions he made along the way. He comes across as the exact opposite of what you'd expect from a Fortune 500 CEO: he's alarmingly human. So human that you can't help but root for him along the way.

Schulz is an emotional guy who believes that every employee in the company must love the product in order for Starbucks to achieve success. He isn't afraid to take incredible risks, such as closing down every single store in 2007 to retrain more than 100,000 baristas because the product they were delivering was sub par, or running a $30 million dollar leadership conference in the middle of the fall of 2008's economic collapse (In post Katrina New Orleans of all places, Schulz shows how calculated risks can invigorate a company).

Schultz does not dodge outside criticisms of his performance, nor does he eschew self-criticism. For many of its employees and customers, Starbucks is a sacred place that fills needs of connectedness and companionship. Schultz reprints correspondence from both employees and customers that demonstrate the special place that local Starbucks stores hold in the hearts and minds of so many. The author pledges to donate the book's proceeds to support neighborhoods where stores are located and to provide financial relief to employees facing emergencies.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.