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Ooma Core VoIP Phone System
by ooma
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2
votes
I'm an alarm-tech, and here's how you do it! 1 new wire (recommended for alarm system reliability) should be run from the main alarm panel to a new (dual) phone jack wall plate nearby the ooma (or any voip equipment). This way a new setup for "line seizure" exists. Without this: the alarm panel will not get a dedicated dial tone since the (dial tone) signal is coming from inside the house instead of outside (like before). This makes it much easier and more reliable in the long run. Plug the ooma phone wire into the new wall plate jack that connects to the alarm system, (have them labeled) and then plug your phone into the other jack and you're done! Wire the dual phone jack as follows with the top plug to the ooma and the bottom to the local phone (assuming there was a single jack there before). Top plug connect the alarm panel red & green wires to the red & green screw terminals. Bottom plug connect the house red & green to the red & green screw terminals. Now to interface: connect the alarm panel wire yellow to the house red (keep both wires on the terminal) and the alarm panel black wire to the house green wire (keep both wires on the terminal). Now the alarm system can take priority of the line properly and the house system still works as normal. Most alarm panels have a ringer equivalent of ZERO thanks to intelligent relay designs! As long as you can hold a voice conversation without your voice sounding like a bad cell phone call (clicky & digitized) then the alarm can do just as well in the "Contact-ID" reporting format. It's not as complex of a signal as the other common SIA format (which is like a modem signal and requires a very clear line, even landlines don't make it sometimes). Both formats get the signal to the central station just the same, but SIA does it in about 1 to 2 seconds for all signals whereas Contact-ID does it in 3 to 4 seconds for each zone reporting. I think I can live with a 4 second delay instead of a 2 second delay in my alarm system reporting time if it means I don't have to keep the landline or go to a more expensive cellular system. PLUS if the extra wire is run your alarm still works if the phone wires on the outside of the house (in the Telco box) get cut, whereas a simple rewire wouldn't prevent this. Enjoy!
Aug 30, 2009 by Ant Farm
2
votes
I don't know, but from the responses, it sounds like it's unlimited except for people that use it over 3000 minutes, in which case it is limited. That's ridiculous. I ran into that years ago with a dial up service. I started playing backgammon online and using the service a lot, and they threatened to turn off the service. Hacked me off. Unlimited means THERE IS NO LIMIT. I don't care how good their service is, false advertising is a red flag for me as to the moral fiber of the company.
Dec 31, 2008 by SoonerRob
1
vote
Following up on my 11/12 post, I did some testing. I tested my hub and my D-link wireless N router, as well as my Motorola SB4100 cable modem for comparisons. I also tested my telephones, to lend some context. All measurements were taken using a Kill-a-Watt 4400. 1. The Ooma Hub uses 4-5 watts while booting, 5 watts while idle, and 8 watts while in a call (consistent with Raghu's observations). 2. The D-Link router used 2-5 watts while booting and 5-6 watts (fluctuating) when operating. This was with the wireless broadcasting turned on. 3. The Motorola SB4100 used 4-5 watts at all times. 4. Bonus measurements, since this is VOIP-related: Each of my three cordless phones uses 4 watts all the time. That makes measurements 1-3 seem pretty reasonable, IMHO! So, it appears that the Hub uses on a par with small computer-related communications devices. Doesn't seem like much to me, either, as I have several other devices right there on my desk that use a greater amount of power, even when they're (ostensibly) turned off, such as my DVR and computer speakers. I hope you find these details useful, have a great day :-) EDIT / ADDENDUM: Lest I forget to mention the Ooma Scout: I just tested mine, and it uses 2 watts at all times.
Dec 20, 2009 by omaticman
1
vote
I also have Dish Network. Yes, you can use Ooma. You just have to reprogram your Dish receiver(s) to use a prefix when dialing out. Press MENU - 6 - 1 - 4. Highlight prefix code. Press select. In the boxes at the bottom, enter *99. Select save at the right. Hope this helps.
Dec 16, 2008 by Brian
0
votes
If you transfer your phone number that is associated with your DSL service, your DSL Internet connection may not work after the number transfer completes. Prior to porting a number, you should call your DSL company and for "dry-loop" DSL service, which will essentially disassociate your phone numbers from your DSL service.
Dec 29, 2008 by Bobby B
0
votes
Yep, ooma might work as a replacement for four of your lines. Currently, ooma offers a higher tier of service called ooma Premier, which stacks on top of free calling service and basic calling bundled features that are included with the core product. With Premier you get a second line, an additional phone number and the option to add more phone numbers (each for $4.95/mo). Premier is currently priced at $99.99/year or $12.99/mo You'll probably need to keep your fax line, however -- currently ooma does not support number transfers of "800" numbers.
Dec 3, 2008 by Bobby B
0
votes
The Telo will have a functional USB port, that may enable interface with a cell phone. There may be other features announced over time. The Telo also supports high definition conversation with other Telo units if both are using an Ooma wireless handset. The Telo has fewer basic features (no voicemail for example), it also doesn't seem to support incoming caller-id name on the basic plan. Telo users will be charged about $12 per year after the first year as a regulatory recovery fee, hub users continue to get basic service forever at no charge. Ooma just raised the monthly outgoing talk limit to 5,000 minutes per month, after that you must pay 2 cents per minute. Incoming talk is still unlimited. If you want a basic phone, and never want to pay a fee, grab an Ooma hub before they are gone. If you want a phone and don't mind paying either $12 per year, or $10 per month for Ooma premium, then the Telo may be a better choice. In terms of overall value, for a basic phone user the hub wins. However the hub is probably going to stop shipping in the near future. If you want a hub, buy it soon.
Oct 2, 2009 by Pilchard
0
votes
ooma only recommends using the product with fixed-line Internet connections (such as DSL, Cable or Fiber-optic/FiOS). You likely would not experience high voice quality with most Dish Internet providers because of the longer delays associated satellite communications.
Dec 20, 2008 by Bobby B
0
votes
You are most welcome. I would check if they have a website now. Perhaps there is a customer service # to call.
Dec 25, 2013 by J. A. Bailey
0
votes
K. Olson, Don't worry, you can change your number for a one-time fee. See here: http://www.ooma.com/support/knowledgebase/im-planning-move-across-country-what-happens-phone-number-assigned-my-ooma-sys In fact, if you have Premier, you get a second number free, so you could keep one number where you used to live, for friends and family to call you without incurring long distance charges. Then have the second number assigned locally where you've moved.
Feb 10, 2010 by omaticman
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