Ooma and home security systems


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Showing 1-16 of 16 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 12, 2010 7:23:45 AM PST
JMB says:
I was wondering if anyone has Ooma and a home security system. I have Slomons myself, but I was wondering if anyone knows how this works with a security system. I don't see why it wouldn't work well with a security system but who knows. Maybe that unique sound prior to the dial tone could affect it I suppose.

I currently use vonage and it works fine, but I'm really interested in this. Especially since I'm not very satisfied with vonage's service as of late.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2010 11:17:09 PM PST
T. Puckett says:
if you can email me I wil tell you the TRUE story

Posted on Jan 30, 2011 4:10:42 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 30, 2011 4:11:19 PM PST
CV says:
Hi,

Would you please tell me if Ooma will work with a home security system? Thanks.

Best regards,

CV

Posted on Feb 5, 2011 4:44:41 PM PST
jbwam says:
Ooma hub cannot transmit touch tones to control any equipment in the home, although it can transmit if calling out. Telo handles tones bith ways.
So, if anybody dials into your alarm, etc., and punches in tones, the hub will not do it.
Telo will, but otherwise, it depends on your monitoring, and how alarm sends out calls, etc.

Posted on Mar 29, 2011 10:14:48 PM PDT
It works, but a VOIP systems are not a UL certified way to hook your alarm system to an alarm monitoring station. Some monitoring stations will make you sign a wavier saying it's not their fault if your VOIP system fails to alert the monitoring station. This may or may not affect your insurance rates or coverage. Some discounts or coverages only work if your system is fully UL certified. If you don't care about that, VOIP can work to still contact the monitoring station. A lot of new discount "net based" alarm monitoring stations use VOIP, but once again are not UL certified.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 29, 2011 10:23:58 PM PDT
T. Puckett says:
UL means "Underwriters Labrotory" it only means a specific electronic device is "safe" by USA standards, nothing more

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 29, 2011 10:43:31 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 29, 2011 11:18:02 PM PDT
@T. Puckett
UL also certified monitoring stations. Or I guess the official term is "listed". Quoted from the official UL site:

What does "Listed alarm service company" mean?
"Listed alarm service company" is a shorthand way of saying that a company is authorized to use the UL Listing Mark on alarm services that are in compliance with UL's requirements. For alarm systems, the UL Mark is a certificate.

What does "Listed central station" mean?
A "Listed central station" is an alarm monitoring facility that has demonstrated the ability to provide Standards-complying service. For monitoring stations, UL requirements cover building structure, receiving and monitoring equipment, and staffing issues in addition to installation and ongoing service. To be able to provide Standards-complying service, the building, equipment and staffing requirements have to be met at all times. However, the handling of specific signals from specific alarm systems is only audited by UL if a certificate is in effect for that alarm system.

What does "Certificated alarm system" mean?
A "certificated alarm system" is one where the certificate-issuing alarm company declares that Standards-complying alarm service is provided. It is equivalent to a manufacturer whose name appears in a UL product directory choosing to place a UL Mark on a specific production product. A certificated alarm system is subject to random audit by UL alarm system auditors to countercheck compliance, just as a product with a UL Mark is subject to random audit.

Also, UL has an EU mark now too. They don't just do USA standards anymore. They are most know for testing electronic and electrical devices to safety standards, but they do a lot more than just that. Water testing is another example of another field they are in.

Posted on Mar 29, 2011 10:47:12 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 29, 2011 10:48:56 PM PDT
T. Puckett says:
"UL" is Underwriters Labrotory....it means the electronic device passes US standards and is safe to use...don't believe everything you read, Google anything you are unsure about. UL Certifying alarm stations, means they are certifying the "Electronic Equipment" to meet USA standards

Posted on Mar 29, 2011 11:16:54 PM PDT
@T. Puckett
The information I pulled is from the official UL site, UL.com. It was not just a random Google result.

Yes, UL does certify the alarm equipment. But an alarm monitoring station may also be "UL Listed". To be "UL listed" it must also meet certain UL requirements, which are not all "Electronic Equipment" related. As stated above, the listed central station must meet certain building (needs to be secure), equipment, and staffing requirements in order to be a UL listed central station.

UL does a lot of other things besides just certifying Electronic Equipment. If you check out their site, you will also notice they certify and have standards for gasket, safes, and many other non-electronic items. They even have a certification program for bottled water now!

Posted on Mar 29, 2011 11:32:15 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 29, 2011 11:33:06 PM PDT
@T. Puckett
If you want to see some of the UL marks just google for "UL Marks Appearance & Significance".
http://www.ul.com/global/eng/pages/corporate/aboutul/ulmarks/mark/

You will notice they certify things other than just electronics, and you will also notice they certify for non-US standards too. They have marks for Marks for Asia, Europe, Latin America, and of course North America.

UL even has a side company that UL registers "firms"! "The UL Registered Firm Mark is a mark never applied to a product because it indicates that a particular facility has passed UL's evaluation to management system standards. The Mark is used in promotion and marketing by companies with management system programs audited by UL. The standards UL uses are the ISO 9000 series of quality assurance standards."

The UL has really expanded past electronics and USA standards now.

Posted on Mar 29, 2011 11:36:21 PM PDT
T. Puckett says:
believe what you want, if you say UL now certifies "Water" and you want to take an electronics companies word on whether the water you drink is good, then go for it, So Mote It Be.

Posted on Mar 30, 2011 12:05:01 AM PDT
UL is basically just a lab and certification company. If they can hire scientist, develop test requirements, and get test equipment; they can test and certify it. It is up to you if you want to trust their results and certifications. And I agree, buyer beware is certainly always true.

Posted on Apr 6, 2011 4:55:47 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 6, 2011 5:13:32 PM PDT
jbwam says:
I believe somebody has not done their homework, and never looked up what they insist on being true, even though S.Le is very informed about the subject, and continued to research.

So, as far as certification, do you go to a doctor that is certified? I hope so.
Can they still not heal you, or even kill you?
Here is a byline for UL, which happens to own UL.com, by the way. How many electronic devices were there 100 years ago. Somebody is blowing smoke, though I do admit that in some cases the certification is limited to devices, but not as far as alarms...
For those that won't look it up...

UL.com
Independent, not-for-profit product safety testing and certification organization. Testing products for public safety for more than a century.
UL has developed more than 1000 Standards for Safety. Our Standards for Safety are essential to helping ensure public safety and confidence, reduce costs, ...

Alarms are for safety, by the way. They have certified alarms back before electonics.
It is quite a bit more than having to do with electronics...

What does "Listed central station" mean?
A "Listed central station" is an alarm monitoring facility that has demonstrated the ability to provide Standards-complying service. For monitoring stations, UL requirements cover building structure, receiving and monitoring equipment, and staffing issues in addition to installation and ongoing service. To be able to provide Standards-complying service, the building, equipment and staffing requirements have to be met at all times. However, the handling of specific signals from specific alarm systems is only audited by UL if a certificate is in effect for that alarm system.

Posted on Apr 14, 2011 2:11:38 AM PDT
Even after reading all of these discussions, I am still confused if Ooma will work with any security systems like ADT or not? I also have a Vonage VoIP and am planning to purchase this Ooma. Should I even bother to change or it will definitely work with my security system? Let me know. Your help is appreciated.

Posted on Apr 26, 2011 12:22:40 AM PDT
jbwam says:
The best info would be on the ooma message boards, and also you can call their sales people. http://www.ooma.com/forums/
1-888-711-ooma ooma=6662

I suspect that a hub would not work, but a telo might.
Do not port a number until all works well, of course.

Posted on May 16, 2011 3:13:48 PM PDT
daddycakes says:
Shop around until you find a company with wireless systems. I don't like the thought of someone cutting my phone and cable lines anyway. Sometimes they run deals where they throw in the wireless for free.
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Participants:  7
Total posts:  16
Initial post:  Nov 12, 2010
Latest post:  May 16, 2011


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