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Open Government: Collaboration, Transparency, and Participation in Practice Paperback – February 23, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0596804350 ISBN-10: 0596804350 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (February 23, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596804350
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596804350
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #995,816 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"In general, readers new to social media will enjoy an extensive introduction that accurately describes the current state of Internet communities and provides significant insight into the historical trends that have led us into the Twitter age...One step toward achieving a well executed social media marketing campaign involves understanding the best ways to engage communities. Weinberg's book is a great place to start."
--Armando Roggio, Practical eCommerce

"...a heck of a book."
--Chris Brogan, ChrisBrogan.com

"I think what readers will find expecially useful is the straightforward and example rich approach Tamar takes in explaining how companies and individuals can succeed towards marketing goals through thoughtful participation. Getting advice from someone who has 'been there, done that' can save a substantial amount of resources, money and shorten the time to get up to speed."
--Lee Odden, Online Marketing Blog

"Want the nitty gritty details of social media success? Weinberg (the Queen of Smart) has literally hundreds of great tips in this book."
--Steve Cunningham, Mashable.com


About the Author

Daniel Lathrop is a former investigative projects reporter with the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. He has covered politics in Washington state, Iowa, Florida and Washington D.C. He was a senior researcher on the New York Times bestselling "The Buying of the President 2004" by Charles Lewis. He is a specialist in campaign finance and "computer assisted reporting," the practice of using data analysis to report the news. He writes code in Perl, Python and PHP. He was the primary architect of the data for the Center for Public Integrity's successful Lobbywatch project, which provided the first truly searchable online database of federal lobbying available to the general public. He supervised the data team that developed CPI's Power Trips investigation of Congressional junkets.

Laurel Ruma is the Gov 2.0 Evangelist at O'Reilly Media. She is the co-chair for the Gov 2.0 Expo. Laurel joined the company in 2005 after being an editor at various IT research/consulting firms in the Boston area. Laurel went to Union College and is a photographer and homebrewer.


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Go find a copy and read it.
M. Helmke
This book covers a wide spectrum of "open government" topics.
Stuckinthe80s
This book paves the road to open and transparent government.
Ismail Elshareef

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By James Mcritchie VINE VOICE on July 7, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I'm not an expert in politics or government. My field is corporate governance. However, I found this book, focused on civil governments, to include many lessons for corporate governments as well.

For example, the chapter by Douglas Schuler discussed online deliberation, including the work of e-Liberate, which developed an online version of Roberts Rules of Order to facilitate online deliberations. The system in its current form can support meetings that take place in real-time over an hour or so and, also, meetings that are more asynchronous (and leisurely), meetings that could, in theory, span a year or so, making it necessary for meeting attendees to log in to e-Liberate once or twice a week to check for recent developments and perhaps vote or make a motion. Might not such a system be useful for facilitating online shareowner forums, shareowner collaboration in deciding on proxy access candidates, or even annual shareowner meetings?

David Eaves builds off the work of Clay Shiky who looked at Ronald Coase's, The Nature of the Firm. Coarse theorized the people didn't self-organize in a manager-free environment because managing transaction costs - the costs of constantly negotiating, coordinating and enforcing agreements - would be prohibitive. In Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations, Shiky asks, "But what if transaction costs don't fall moderately? What if they collapse?" The Internet seems to make that possible. Eaves cites the DIRECT Launcher project, where NASA and non-NASA employees created a virtual "skunk works" to design a rocket that outcompetes NASA.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M. Helmke on March 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
The most basic definition of open government is the idea that people have the right to access the documents and proceedings of government. Being able to closely examine decisions, policies, and procedures is foundational to having the ability to make intelligent and informed decisions as a citizen, especially in a democracy where an informed electorate is vital if good choices are to be made by voters when selecting leaders or holding them accountable.

The Open Government movement is not officially organized as a group or party, rather it is a growing collection of concerned citizens who want to help create better government by increasing citizens' access to information. It has been heavily influenced by the open source software movement and has similar aims: increased collaboration through making options available to any interested party willing to read and study, increased transparency by making source materials freely available for anyone to peruse and examine, and increased participation by eliminating closed systems wherever possible. While this idea was broadcast most widely in the campaign and early days of Barack Obama's presidency, this is not a one-sided political issue as much as it is an Enlightenment era system of belief, enshrined in the United States' Declaration of Independence and Constitution, now being updated for the digital era which is filled with technologies which could make those ideals more easily fulfilled.

Open Government: Collaboration, Transparency, and Participation in Practice is a collection of 34 essays written by a wide variety of people who are interested in both promoting the philosophy of open government and in suggesting practical ways to implement procedures that will assist in applying that philosophy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. D. Lasica on May 11, 2010
Format: Paperback
We've known for years how social media and Web 2.0 have been transforming the way political campaigns are run, the way we interact with big institutions, the way news is reported and distributed -- indeed, practically all facets of modern society. So it comes as no surprise that social technologies are slowly transforming the way government works.

What is surprising is that editors Daniel Lathrop and Laurel Ruma and O'Reilly Media have managed to make a potentially wonky topic like Government 2.0 accessible, fresh and actually interesting. "Open Government"is a big (432 pages), beautiful book, from the gorgeous, sumptuous cover to the breadth of ideas and angles inside. In its collection of 34 essays written by thought leaders and practitioners in government reform, the book offers dozens of examples of a new approach to government: open, democratic, distributed, bottom-up, shareable, data-driven and focused on making "we the people" a reality again.

In the book, the editors have assembled some of the top names in the government reform movement: Ellen Miller, Micah L. Sifry, Mark Drapeau, as well as Fernanda Viegas, Dan Gillmor and dozens of others. You'll learn about the potential of data.gov, the initiative to create a simple framework to share public information, and Open Secrets from the Center for Responsive Politics, used by [...] to correlate congressional voting patterns and campaign contributions. The chapter on Tweet Congress details the efforts to get members of Congress to use Twitter -- even today, Republican Congressmen out number Democrats on Twitter by something like a 2-1 ratio. Other chapters lay out countless other examples of how open government has moved from a geek idea to the mainstream.
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