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OpenGL 4.0 Shading Language Cookbook Paperback – July 26, 2011


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OpenGL 4.0 Shading Language Cookbook + OpenGL Programming Guide: The Official Guide to Learning OpenGL, Version 4.3 (8th Edition) + OpenGL SuperBible: Comprehensive Tutorial and Reference (6th Edition)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 340 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (July 26, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849514763
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849514767
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #229,434 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David Wolff is an associate professor in the Computer Science and Computer Engineering Department at Pacific Lutheran University (PLU). He received his PhD in Physics from Oregon State University. He has a passion for computer graphics and the intersection between art and science. He has been teaching computer graphics to undergraduates at PLU for over 10 years, using OpenGL.


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Customer Reviews

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It looked like a fun thing to do, so I said okay.
Sol_HSA
I found David Wolff's book to be very helpful in learning the foundations of GLSL programming with OpenGL.
Dustin Biser
One of them is in the loading routine of shader files.
Junlin Xu

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sol_HSA on November 25, 2011
Format: Paperback
I got a request from PACKT to review an OpenGL book they've published. It looked like a fun thing to do, so I said okay.

First off, this book is perfect for people who already know their way around OpenGL, but may not be too deep into shaders yet, and/or have some legacy bits in their engines.

The book does walk you through setting up a shader based application, and explains what kinds of support libraries you're going to need (always managing to pick the "other" lib than the ones I've used - they like glew more than glee, for instance - but the libs they picked still work as advertised, so I'm not saying they're bad choises. Oddly, there's no mention of SDL or SFML though), but knowing how OpenGL generally works as well as how the math generally works is taken for granted.

On the positive side you won't have to browse through hundred pages of basic matrix and vector math, or compilation basics, which I feel is a good thing.

After the basics the book gets to the fun stuff, explaining lighting, texture use, screen space trickery (like bloom and deferred shading), geometry shaders and tesselation, practical shadows (i.e, shadow mapping and PCT filters, but doesn't waste pages on anything "more advanced"), noise and some particle tricks.

All in all I think it's a rather good resource for anyone who wants to upgrade their OpenGL knowledge to more "modern OpenGL", dropping all legacy stuff, but it doesn't mean you don't still have to get your hands on the orange book.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Paul T. Miller on October 1, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
This book covers OpenGL Shading Language Core profile 4 and modern OpenGL usage. It does assume some familiarity with OpenGL and C++, which helps to cut down on a lot of introductory boilerplate. It's best to start reading from the beginning, as examples and recipes build on information from previous chapters and Wolff doesn't waste space repeating the same stuff over and over, which I really appreciated.
All of the examples use the newer OpenGL APIs, and there is some basic background information on how to use them. I found this useful for people like me who have been using the fixed-function API for so long. The examples also use OpenGL Mathematics (GLM), an Open Source toolkit for working with OpenGL-style vectors and matrices. I had been unaware of this toolkit, and I'll most likely be switching to it for my next project. Wolff's style is short and to the point and keeps things moving along.
The meat of the book are the recipes, covering a wide range of shading topics, including emulating the OpenGL 2.0 fixed function pipeline, image processing, soft shadows, synthetic texture generation, and particle systems. There is a lot of information here and it is well written, though it assumes the reader is not a complete novice. Be warned, this is NOT a book for beginners.
I had a couple of minor issues with the book. Most of the examples use C++ and the STL but in a few cases Wolff falls back to using malloc/free for temporary buffers. All of the recipes are based on using geometry, and even in the image processing section it is assumed we'll be processing a 3D scene. It would be nice to have some examples focused entirely on doing 2D image processing of images directly.
Those points are very minor though and in all I thought the book was exactly what I needed to bring my skills up to the most recent OpenGL and GLSL standards.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A C++/C# programer on August 20, 2011
Format: Paperback
Finally, I[ve found a book that explains very well the in and out of glsl programming.
The book is core profile all the way, without any opengl 2.1 stub. Chapter 1 details step by step how to set up the glsl programming environment, goes over the meanning of each statement, and shows how to pass the attributes and uniforms from application to the shaders.
However, this is not an introduction to opengl. Reader needs to have knowlege of opengl(fixed function pipeline only) before attempting to read this book.
The example code uses Qt SDK; however, the author separate the rendering and glsl codes out quite cleanly from the Qt's windowing code. It can be used easily with any windowing code such as MFC, fltk, glut, etc.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Andrian Gorohovschi on February 8, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read a number of books on OpenGL Shading Language, most of them cover the same things and David Wolff is no different.

He definitely cuts back on a lot of 'fluff' (as in you don't need an explanation of a function if you're reading this book).

I was disappointed however by a very poor preparation of the hands on part of this cookbook.

My UI background goes way back to win32 to most recent WPF (and number of embedded, plus web stuff). However, I have only seen Qt in passing, and seeing this in the readme file is disheartening:
"It includes a qmake project file, so building the examples should be
very straightforward as long as you have the Qt SDK installed.
It should also load into Qt Creator quite readily."

It is not straightforward.

The problems so far and counting:
The location for glew and glm are assumed to be on c:\OpenGL ... and are not consistent from chapter to chapter.
This is not mentioned anywhere. README is a good place for that.

GLM version 0.9.0.7 is used. Granted not the author's fault, but easily preventable by including GLM with your source files or at least make a note in the README.

Chapter 9 is missing a header file. Granted you can recreate it yourself from the existing .cpp, but this only speaks poorly on the author's attitude towards cookbook-ing

I have expected a higher level of readiness from a cookbook.

If you're looking for a reference on some algorithms this book is fine, but a better choice is "OpenGL Supper Bible 5th edition" which is self sustained and you can pass it along to a complete novice.
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