Operation Luna (Operation Chaos) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Operation Luna Mass Market Paperback – September 15, 2000


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$5.10 $0.01

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Science Fiction; 1st edition (September 15, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812580273
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812580273
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,291,740 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

She's a witch who runs a small but prestigious consulting agency. He's a werewolf who makes his living as an engineer. Similarities to Nick and Nora Charles are, perhaps, not entirely accidental. Anderson's humorous stories about Ginny and Steve Matuchek, set in an alternate contemporary America where most technology is based on magic, first began appearing in the 1950s and were novelized as Operation Chaos in 1971. In his latest novel (after Starfarers), Anderson continues the saga in a tale that features light-hearted cloak-and-dagger suspense, ingenious adaptations of magic to the routine of daily life, and an attempt to send magically endowed spacecraft, including a souped-up broomstick, to the moon under the auspices of NASA (the National Astral Spellcraft Administration). Anderson deals playfully with a number of different magical and religious traditions, centering on Zuni, Chinese and Norse lore. He also introduces a variety of eccentric human and supernatural charactersAincluding Bob Shining Knife, a skilled FBI agent who conducts his investigations in full Apache regalia; Fjalar, a dwarf who is supernaturally skilled at forging both iron and passports; a magical sword named Fotherwick-Botts that won't stop running off at the mouth; and Alger Sneep, an agent of the IRS (Inquisition for Revenue Securement), who attempts to derail the Matucheks' moon flight by quite literally putting them through the audit from hell. The humor can be arch at times, and Anderson's tendency toward thinly veiled libertarian political satire won't work for all readers, but in general this is an enjoyable tale by a veteran writer who knows exactly what he's doing. (Aug.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

Belated and iffy sequel novel to a collection of linked stories, Operation Chaos (1971). The previous volume was set in an alternate world where the Industrial Revolution inhibited magic, so the surviving supernatural Beings spelled themselves to sleep. Later, a method was found to release the ``goetic forces'' (strong magic) and permit a grand Awakening. Now, Project Selene is ready to send a spaceshipa giant horse boosted by four broomsticks!to the moon. But the launch proves a spectacular failure, thanks to certain inimical supernatural influences. So the National Astral Spellcraft Administration calls in consultant witch Ginny Graylock and her werewolf/engineer husband Steve Matuchek. The two diagnose interference from the Trickster, Coyote, and other powers, possibly Chinese. Despite hassles from the IRS, Ginny and Steve receive authorization to proceed with Project Luna, their own smaller, quieter method of reaching the moon, since only there can they find out who's trying to destroy the space program, and why. Ginny will be assisted by her precocious 13-year-old daughter, Valeria, her familiar, Edgar the raven, and various friendly American Indian shamans. Steve flies off to England to find a powerful antique talking swordit now calls itself Fotherwick-Bottsalong with the sword's smith, the massive, uninhibited, hammer-wielding dwarf, Fjalar. Anderson's not particularly comfortable with his material: a glum, effortful outing, too seldom vitalized by humor or imagination. -- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

And in my opinion most people will have a lot of fun reading Operation Luna.
Indiana Reviewer
I don't want to give away too much about the book itself and ruin it for future readers, so I'll just have to say I love this book and it's predecessor.
Monti K.
Not a bad book, and adequately readable, but it just isn't what it's predecessor was!
M. Broderick

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M. Broderick VINE VOICE on December 10, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I loved Operation Chaos, and really looked forward to this book, but it didn't enthrall me the way the original book did. It just seems like things never take off, and I was never thrilled the way I was by the first book. The climactic "quest" (admittedly a poor choice of words, but I have none better) doesn't capture the imagination like the descent into Hell of the original, and climax seems short and unsatisfying. Not a bad book, and adequately readable, but it just isn't what it's predecessor was!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Frederick D. Schulkind on August 9, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is a sequel to Operation Chaos, which was written 30, and some parts over 40, years ago! It is set in a contemporary universe where magic (or goetics as they call it) works. It is a scientific culture, and the laws of physics apply. Familiar and strange principles combine to create some hilarious sections. One does tend to question the presence of streets in a world where everyone flies around on brooms and carpets. The main characters are Steve Matuchek and his wife Virginia. Steve, an engineer and werewolf, gives a first-person account. Virginia, a beautiful and powerful witch who is the real brain of the pair, has no qualms about using her looks and sex appeal as well as her skills. She even travels to another universe to find a tax attorney. She and Steve must deal with good, evil and mischievous spirits, rival practitioners, NASA, the FBI and the IRS. Also in the mix is their daughter, Valeria, who was 3 years old when she was taken to hell (alive!) She is now 15, gorgeous, nubile, a budding witch and ready to play an active role. There is an overly talkative sword, an ancient dwarf and other interesting characters and scenes in a humorous treatment of the serious subject of space travel development and the evil attempts to stop it; brilliant!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Yoon Ha Lee on November 11, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I was delighted when I heard that a sequel to _Operation Chaos_, a collection of loosely-related stories set in a techno-magical alternate Earth, had come out. Unfortunately, I can't recommend _Operation Luna_ as I would its prequel.
A lot of great elements are there: mankind's effort to reach the moon, our familiar protagonists from _Operation Chaos_ (Steve Matuchek, werewolf engineer, and Virginia Graylock, witch extraordinaire), a garrulous enchanted sword (named Fotherwick-Botts) from the Norse era and his forger, a dwarven smith who adjusts poorly to modern life, Coyote's schemes and uneasy dreams....
Alas, despite the attempts at levity, the story never really comes together. Steve Matuchek wasn't the best choice of a narrator. While he's definitely involved in the action in _Operation Chaos_, here he's relegated to reporting on everyone else's actions since, due to his lack of magical expertise, he can't actually get involved. As a result, a lot of potential suspense (will Virginia succeed in her quest for Mimir's knowledge? will their daughter Valeria survive her desperate attempt to foil the IRS?) trickles away. Another problem is that the evils and dangers confronted are rarely convincingly dangerous. Occasionally Anderson throws in social criticism of our world as it is (in contrast to this magical alter-Earth), but there isn't enough of it to fully convince, and it sits uneasily with the lighter tone of most of the story.
All in all, while it's a light and often entertaining tale, _Operation Luna_ fails to live up to the wit, fine worldbuilding and daredevil adventures of its prequel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 26, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I had been looking forward to Poul Anderson's _Operation Luna_, a sequel to _Operation Chaos_, a fix-up of stories in F & SF from the 1950s and 1960s. Unfortunately, I cannot recommend it in hardcover and possibly not even in paper. First, while not absolutely required, I think that reading the earlier book would be extremely helpful (and a new pb edition is out). Second, Anderson made a decision to bring the story forward to an equivalent of our "now". The three 1950s stories take place either in that universe's equivalent of WWII (called that in the first story, but now called the Caliph's War (WWI is now the Kaiser's War)) or a little bit later. The last story in the fix-up has elements of the late 1950s and late 1960s. But while no year is mentioned, this novel takes place in some age resembling our present. Problem is the protagonist's daughter has aged only 10 or so years and it simply doesn't work for someone more concerned about continuity instead of plot. Third, the first part of the book is clunky like a square wheel trying to set up the storyline, throw in how that universe works versus ours, describe what has happened since _Operation Chaos_, etc. Fourth, we know more than the characters do, a distraction for us. Fifth, while there are a number of in the sf field jokes and puns, some of the points concerning our world are mean-spirited without a specific reason. I finished it, but I consider it to be fairly minor league Anderson.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Oso Blanco on March 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is a wonderful sequel to one of the neatest books of all time, "Operation Chaos." Our heroes return to us enough older that they'll use a mirror to peek around the corner at their foes, and still bold enough to charge the guns if that's what it takes to do the job. In a universe where "Any sufficiently advanced magic is indistinguishable from technology," courage and intelligence count. There are also some utterly delightful japes here that had me in stitches more than once. I came away from the bound galley I got to read richly rewarded for my time spent. I have also sworn an oath that when this book finally comes out, at least one copy is *mine*.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.