Qty:1
  • List Price: $53.95
  • Save: $6.86 (13%)
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very clean pages, binding tight, soft cover nice with mild wear. In very good condition. Eligible for Free Super Saver Shipping and Prime.Tracking number provided in your amazon account.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Operation Pedro Pan: The Untold Exodus of 14,048 Cuban Children Paperback – January 1, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0415928236 ISBN-10: 0415928230 Edition: Reprint

Buy New
Price: $47.09
17 New from $47.08 21 Used from $6.90
Rent from Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$10.22
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$45.44 $7.91
Paperback
"Please retry"
$47.09
$47.08 $6.90

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student




Frequently Bought Together

Operation Pedro Pan: The Untold Exodus of 14,048 Cuban Children + Fleeing Castro: Operation Pedro Pan and the Cuban Children's Program
Price for both: $59.72

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Lexile Measure: 1170L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; Reprint edition (January 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415928230
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415928236
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #914,981 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Conde was 10 when her parents put her on a flight to the U.S. alone. She was one of 14,048 children to make the trip via Operation Pedro Pan, a clandestine organization that smuggled visas intoAand children out ofACuba. This book is not a memoir, but a well-researched history of Operation Pedro Pan, a portrait of early revolutionary Cuba and a compendium of testimony from the now-grown children. As Conde shows, the near-unanimous joy at Castro's ascent turned to growing disillusionment and fear as he revealed his commitment to Communism. The rumor of a coming "patria postetad," a document that allegedly would order all children over the age of three into State care, made exiling the children an attractive option for many. Operation Pedro Pan ultimately involved the Catholic church, the CIA, the State Department and multiple civic groups in the struggle to find U.S. homes for the children. About half were without relatives or friends on arrival and were placed in orphanages, foster homes or boarding schools until their parents could get visas to join them. Conde's study of Pedro Pan cases is interesting, but her conclusionAthat as adults they are left straddling two culturesAcould probably be said of any immigrant group. She is better at tracing the causes of the flight than analyzing the effects, especially as she treats her own story in the same brief and fragmentary manner as the other case histories she offers. 8 pages of photos not seen by PW. Author tour.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

It's a remarkable episode in cold war history: 14,000 Cuban children sent from the island by their parents in the years after Castro's revolution. Conde was a participant but didn't realize she was one of thousands until she read Joan Didion's Miami, which stimulated her curiosity and, ultimately, this book. Conde sent out some 800 questionnaires and received 442 written responses; she interviewed 173 people, including Pedro Pan children, parents, foster parents, journalists, teachers, psychologists, and opponents of Castro in Cuba. The book's primary value lies in the individual stories, from tearful departure and arrival in Miami to temporary shelters and placement in homes or, in some cases, in orphanages; to learning a new language and adjusting and, in many cases, assimilating; to reunions with parents, adolescence in the '60s and '70s, and adulthood. The book is not particularly well written or organized, but its subject makes Conde's work worth considering for acquisition. Mary Carroll --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Yvonne M. Conde, born in Havana, Cuba, is an author, freelance journalist, columnist and television producer based in New York City.
Conde's parents sent her out of Cuba alone at the age of 10 as part of the exodus of 14,048 Cuban children now known as Operation Pedro Pan. Her family joined her a year later and moved to Puerto Rico in 1963, where Ms. Conde lived until 1971 when she joined Pan American Airways and moved to New York City.
Years later while pursuing a Masters Degree in Journalism at NYU--where she won a Best News and Public Affairs Work prize for the documentary "Journeys to New York-The Immigrant Experience Today"--she discovered that she had been part of the juvenile exodus and it motivated her to write Operation Pedro Pan-The Untold Exodus of 14,048 Cuban Children (Routledge 1999), translated into Spanish by Random House in 2001. Random House also published La Sabiduria de los Nuestros, her compilation of over 1,000 quotes by Hispanics (2006). Ms. Conde contributed to the Encyclopedia of Cuba by Greenwood Publishing Group (2003) Cuba Mia, Editorial Zun Zun (2003) and Pan American World Airways- Aviation History Through the Words of its People (Bluewater Press 2011).
For three years Conde wrote a weekly socio-political weekly column for New York City's HOY, a Spanish language newspaper. She was a former contributing editor for Hispanic Business magazine. She has been published in Air & Space/Smithsonian, Contacto, Crain's New York Business, Editor & Publisher, Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, The Miami Herald, The New York Sun, Latina, Vista, and Manhattan South as well as Spanish and Russian publications.
Besides a researcher/producer for documentaries, Conde has been a panelist and appeared in numerous televison and radio shows.
She lives in Manhattan with her husband, Dr. Bernabé Loret de Mola.

Customer Reviews

There isn't much of the human side of to the story.
triple A
It is an often repeated story of innocent children displaced by a megalomaniac who believes in himself more than he should.
Peter E. Carr
I have read other books relating to the same subject, but this one is definitely the best.
Puericantor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 13, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I just finished reading Operation Pedro Pan and I found it engrossing! I couldn't put it down. Although I am Cuban and a Pedro Pan child myself, I believe I am objective when I say that, yes, the book has a couple of typos, but nothing that detracts from the overall quality of this important historical work. As for it not being "organized"according to the Booklists review, Ms. Conde has presented a wonderful chronological sequence of events, starting with a thorough explanation of the political events in Cuba 1959-62 that made our parents take the drastic action of sending us away. It is followed with information on how the program started, how the visas were distributed clandestinely in Cuba, the temporary shelters in Miami where we were placed, letters from the children back then, and chapters on orphanages, living with foster families, abuse, forgetting our Spanish, the reunions with our parents, what happened to some of us in the 60's and 70's and comments from the children today on how this experience affected us. It finishes with the very valuable results of her questionnaire to 442 of the children, the only research of its type to date, as far as I know. Not well organized? C'mon! As for "not particularly well written"(Booklist again) people either like or dislike different authors and their styles, I found hers to be journalistic and easy to read. Who are these critics and what are their hidden agendas?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It is a vivid, accurate, well documented and honest account of the events that took place four decades ago. As a Pedro Pan participant, this book brought back many memories and experiences that I lived through. It is very well written and easy to read. It makes the reader feel that she or he is witnessing the story unfold before their own eyes. Some addresses, direction to places (the entrance to the Kendall camp was on SW 117 Ave, not 107 Ave) and sequential events in the camps are incorrect (the Marists brothers were the ones that closed Kendall and opened the Opa-Locka camp). These are minor details that do not subtract from the overall content and quality of this book. It is the best written and the most informative account of this exodus of unaccompanied children that I have read to date.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 19, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book brings to light a historical phenomenon hidden beneath the spotlight of cold war headlines of the early 1960s. Nearly forty years later, the exodus of 14,000 Cuban children whose lives were devastated by those headlines would still be hidden, if not for the diligent work of Yvonne Conde. Through painstaking research and sensitive, insightful writing, Conde has laid out in meticulous detail a more complete story of the effects of Castro's revolution on the lives of the Cuban people than I have read before.
As a middle-class American who was fourteen in 1961, I was shocked to read of this all-but-lost piece of history-14,000 Cuban children sent alone from their homes, many of whom were my age at the time.
Impressive in her ability to combine a clean, journalistic style with empathy and deep insight, Conde has written a beautiful and important book that lays out a timeline of political events even as it captures the personal pain, loneliness and fear of innocent children. The author tells each story in a way that compels the reader to imagine being a child again, suddenly sent away from parents and home to adjust, at best, to a foreign language, strange food and customs and harsh climates and, at worst, to endure the nightmare of physical, emotional or sexual abuse at the hands of strangers. This is essential reading for anyone who wants to know the whole story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Josefina Palau on March 28, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book narrates a very important chapter of the cuban exile history. I am one of the children of Peter Pan and proud of it. Buy it for your children and the generations to come.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 10, 1999
Format: Hardcover
As a Cuban-American, I looked forward to reading this new study. Although the information presented was interesting and even touching at times, I was greatly disappointed by the apallingly bad editing of the text. Examples abound of incomplete sentences, grammatical mistakes, typographical errors, Spanish words inappropriately accented and bad syntax. One can blame the author, of course, but then you are left wondering why Routledge can't afford a more attentive editorial team. I expected more of this publishing house. Both the subject and the author merit their full attention.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 2, 1999
Format: Hardcover
To Yvonne M. Conde I want to say, thank-you, thank-you, thank-you for writing this book. This true story is very close to my heart, for I am also, a Pedro Pan child. Reading this book was painful at times but at the same time it validated my part in it. As time goes by sometimes you wonder, did all that really happened or is my memory playing tricks on me? For me it has been almost 38 years. The book is very easy to read and the research that was involved comes through. I am buying two more copies to give my american born daughters. They have heard some of the stories from me, but again this is validation. I can identify with many of the feelings expressed by the other stories and I could not have said it as eloquent. This book will be with me forever.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search