Customer Reviews


246 Reviews
5 star:
 (175)
4 star:
 (52)
3 star:
 (11)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't Describe In Words
The guy who said that everybody and their dog likes Tool, you have to realize that isn't a bad thing. This is no fad like "Korn" or "Limp Bizkit". It is just that everyone knows how unbelievable and mind-expanding this band is. As I have said in my other Tool reviews, it is hard to choose between the 3 cd's. In fact, it is impossible, because they...
Published on November 2, 1999

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Tool becomes the new opiate of the masses
This EP doesn't stack up well against Tool's LP's, which is understandable given their brilliance, but it is still very good. I found it to be too musically generic, and Maynard hadn't fully honed his vocal skills yet, yelling through most of the record, with title track being his finest effort. However, one can clearly see evidence of the lyrical genius that was to...
Published on July 27, 2002 by adam12345


‹ Previous | 1 225 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't Describe In Words, November 2, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
The guy who said that everybody and their dog likes Tool, you have to realize that isn't a bad thing. This is no fad like "Korn" or "Limp Bizkit". It is just that everyone knows how unbelievable and mind-expanding this band is. As I have said in my other Tool reviews, it is hard to choose between the 3 cd's. In fact, it is impossible, because they are each great for their own reasons. This album, the 6-song EP released in '92, is a compilation of what Maynard says were their "heaviest" songs at the time. Anyways, give this CD a listen if you already have Aenima and Undertow...this was the first Tool CD I bought, and I still love it even more than on the day I bought it. All the songs are great, but "Opiate" and "Jerk-Off" are my personal favorites...I have never seen Tool in concert, but I am hoping that if I do, they will finish the show with "Jerk-Off"...that would be great.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An underrated masterpiece, December 31, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
Opiate, though only a 7 song EP, remains one of my favorite CDs of all time as well as a great masterpiece of music that few people know about. This album is able to show all of Tool's raw power through only a few songs. The overall theme of the CD seems to be focused on a religious viewpoint, discussing individuals who use religion as a crutch and blindly follow it with no question, allowing others to interpret the religion for them.
The CD begins with "Sweat", which reflects Tool's power in a significant way and is on the level with all of their singles. It then moves into "Hush", a song discussing censorship of music, and the singer's views on the subject. It's a song that manages humor and seriousness all at once. Track 3 "Part Of Me" takes hard rock to a completely new level that only Tool can do, as the song is great and full of energy.
This EP also contains 2 live tracks; "Cold And Ugly" and "Jerk-Off". Both display Tool's awesome live performance skills. The band is so on-key and tuned in both performances that both sound as if they were recorded in a studio. Both are full of power and emotion and keep the album flowing. The album's closing track "Opiate" brings the religious theme of the album into full perspective, from both a sarcastic and serious point of view. Following is the hidden track "The Gaping Lotus Experience", a humorous song about experience with drugs.
To sum it all up, if you're a fan of very hard rock with a meaning behind it, and are open-minded and thoughtful about your music, check this out. This is an album not to be missed. Also be sure to look into Tool's other 2 releases "Undertow" and "AEnima", both equally amazing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Seems like I'm slipping into a dream within a dream...", September 29, 2003
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
Well, here it is: Tool's roots. All the blood, sweat, and tears of Maynard, Adam, Paul, and Danny, packed onto this 6-Song, 26-Minute EP for our listening pleasure. Even though it's short, you can really tell they worked hard on it. Of course, this would only be the beginning...
Here's a track rundown:
1. Sweat: Great way to open Opiate, and is my favorite song on the album. Catchy, dark, and thought-provoking: this would soon prove to be the Tool standard. I believe it is about drug abuse.
2. Hush: Another winner. This track showcases Maynard's outstanding songwriting skills. It's about censorship and how silly it is. "People tell me what to say, what to think and what to play..." That's another great aspect of Tool: they encourage nonconformity.
3. Part Of Me: Good song, featuring great drumming by Danny Carey. Infectious little number, with a weird, but great vocal effect. Also has a couple of time changes.
4. Cold & Ugly (Live): "Somebody throw this Bob Marley wannabe [edit] out of here!" One of the album's two live tracks. However, the playing is so top-notch, it's pretty hard to tell. Superb vocals and guitar work.
5. J**k-Off (Live): You all know what the title is, I just don't know if you can say it here. Anyway, this one's got the best lyrics of the bunch. Definitely Tool's angriest song (at least lyric-wise).
6. Opiate: A good closer to the EP. Features Maynard's infamous anti-religion lyrics. Also listen up for the hidden song: it's pretty funny.
All in all, this is definitely a great way to feature the roots of the one and only Tool. I recommend it to anyone who just wants to hear something different than Wimp Bizkit.
"I know you better than I know myself..."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Driven First CD - Hints of Progressive Beneath the Chrome, February 27, 2003
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
"Opiate" was Tool's first release, and immediately pegged the band as metal, though they have attempted to defy that classification by releasing albums that are more progressive metal and perhaps alternative metal or even alternative progressive. Regardless of what they did later, "Opiate" is a crunchy hard rocker.
"Sweat" kicks off with short line lyrics and heavy guitars that are a hallmark of the Black Sabbath school of hard rock. The riffs occasionally recall Led Zeppelin, and the topic of "Sweat" may also recall drug music of the 70s. In its own way retro, this song may be less than what you could make of it; it may just be a hard rock dream.
The next song, "Hush", is the perennial rebellion song. The message is short and to the point. You keep telling me what I can't say, so I tell you to go do physically impossible things to yourself. The music is edgy, and the Led Zeppelin influence is clearly felt, though with an even harder edge.
"Part of Me" is a song with personality, a song about a part of males that controls us, and yet we do not want that control sometimes. It's amazing how a piece of you can be so much in control when it does only a couple of things. The drums lead this piece, but the guitar crunches are more Black Sabbath than Led Zeppelin. Solid metal.
"Cold and Ugly" is another lyrically simple song, performed live, that starts out like thrash rock. The guitars crunch and wail, but the lyrics become quiet, drifting back to a grunge sound. Between the wails this song is about relationships and people, and how they are beneath the exterior they show the world.
The next song expresses how many of us feel about certain people in the world. "Jerk-Off" makes no apologies for calling them like they see them. The rock is driving and driven, and fully emphasizes the point. A great song to relieve your stresses to.
The last song, "Opiate", is perhaps the most different of the group. This song feels like grunge, or at least blues-influence rock, and is calmer than the other songs on the CD. This song is also the longest song on the CD, and feels like progressive with occasional alternative influences in addition to metal. There are occasional flashes of thrash metal on this song, but it remains a harbinger of Tool's later CDs where the progressive became more predominant. This song does have a somewhat acid-rock ending, which is fitting since Tool's music often seems to have a strong retro influence.
This short debut CD showed the promise of Tool, and the direction Tool would eventually head, though you had to find it amongst a variety of styles. This CD may be mild for those who prefer groups like Hatebreed, but for those who like their rock edgy and hard with a variety of styles and a clear musical artistry, this CD and Tool should be on their must-have list.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Significant Debut, June 21, 2006
By 
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
One of two great rock debuts from 1992 - the other one being the Rage Against The Machine ("RATM") debut - this EP came out a year after the grunge movement threatened to make all rock not from Seattle irrelevant. Yet this band was not grunge, and like RATM they were from So. Cal. The songs were unlike any other band, in that they seemed to concoct a new version of intelligent angst with Sabbath-influenced rock, played by a highly disciplined group of musicians who played more tightly as a unit than any other band this side of thrash. Another difference between Tool and grunge, however, was that there was an element of progessive, experimental music here, which the band would flesh out in their subsequent releases.

Arguably, the most unique thing about Tool on this record was their singer, Maynard James Keenan. He had an ability to convey self-loathing, angry, socially aware, generation X lyrics in a way that seemed fresh. He also had a crystal-clear, ferocious voice. Indeed, the live tracks, "Cold and Ugly" and "Jerk-off" were testament to Maynard's competance as a live singer. A new rock god was born.

This was a significant debut from the band that forged the way for alternative metal/prog rock. Most subsequent metal bands were influenced by these guys. The live tracks, in particular, are reason to pick up this EP as they represent the band's "Live at Leeds" moment.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I saw a blueprint, December 6, 2002
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
I've had Opiate in my collection for some 4 years now and it really hasn't aged that badly in musical collection(despite my recent hard left turn in musical tastes). Sure it doesn't get spun as much say my Blur or Fugazi collection(to which I own all of their LP releases), but it still holds a special place. And maybe even a little more so then say AEnima or Lateralus, dispite the latter being far superiour albums.
What strikes me as different or even more accessible about Opiate over their later albums is that when their music was so much more straight forward. None of the self-absorbed song lengths or almost too uptight feel of those records can be heard here. No, on Opiate we get just straight ahead great rock with some budding talented musicianship. The songs feel so much more free form with out all the anal retention that comes from listening to Lateralus(one the main reason I don't listen to that album that much). And even more uncharacteristic of their later records, Tool even shows a sense of humor(the opening to the two live tracks not to mention the hidden track at the end of Opiate).
Opiate is best discribed as a blueprint of what Tool would later develope to become one of rock's most respect mainstream acts. But rather than feeling like a stepping stone, Opiate still has enough punch to it that it can stand on its own with out the help of Tool's namesake. Opiate is just good music, bar none.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shame. He Doesn't get it, does he?, August 31, 2004
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
Firstly, anyone sad enough to come to a review about a band that they just want to shoot down is exactly that ... SAD. So to you, "Torny", I'd say that you probably have deeper issues than being overweight. In any case, who are you to shoot down the opinions of every fan of Tool or judge them and generalise and jump to your obviously confused conclusions? I'm not overweight, if it means anything, and I know that tool make good music. I don't care if you don't like it. I'm not going to base my likes and dislikes on what you think. And, just because you can use big words doesn't mean you are somewhere above "pseudo-intellectual".

Torny, you might or might not have noticed that Mayanard is not the only member of Tool. Tool features respected drummer Danney Carey, award-winning guitarist Adam Jones, and an unmistakably brilliant bassist, Justin Chancellor. Tool uses complex rhythms and time signatures such as 5/4 and 7/8. This is not an easy thing to do, and I speak from experience, being a drummer, guitarist and vocalist. Yet, I suppose that to the common music listener it all sounds the same.

As for the fact that us "ugly suburban losers" haven't experienced any hardship ... who the hell are you to say? Maybe you feel that you have had a hard time of life, but if you were perhaps even close to "pseudo-intellectual", you would be able to understand that Mayanard's lyrics reflect serious issues which he experienced.

Since you brought up the topic of angst, I think you should take a look at yourself before you continue. You clearly wrote your review either to let out some frustrations, obviously due to your unbearable issues, or to get the attention you've been deprived of for most of your life.

So, to anyone who knows what good music is, and anyone that appreciates this music, go get it. If you enjoy Kayo Dot, and I do not doubt that it is good music, get that too. Just be open minded, and bear other people's opinions in mind before you publicly embarass yourself.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars incredible CD, i still love it, February 26, 2000
By 
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
i first bought this CD about two or three years ago, and i've never been bored with it. Every single song is amazing with great lyrics and spectacular guitar and bass riffs. Not to mention that Danny Carey is one of the best drummers i've heard in a long time. the only drummer even close to him would be Lars Ulrich of Metallica. Below is a small review of each song.
1-Sweat: my second favorite track here, the chorus is incredible. 5/5.
2-Hush: an interesting vocal topic and a really cool riff. the bridge is also really good. 4/5.
3-Part Of Me: a great song accompanied by great drumming and bass work. 5/5.
4-Cold & Ugly: the best TOOL song written. simply incredible. 10/5.
5-Jerk-Off: another awesome song, the ending's the best part. 5/5.
6-Opiate: this is the "famous" song about how could people blindly follow their religion without questioning it. great song with exceptional lyrics. 5/5.
Overall, this is an awesome effort by Tool, who is by far one of my favorite bands (them, along with Incubus, Metallica and KoRn) out there.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Raw and intricate!, May 5, 2005
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
1992 was a great year. Rage Against Machine released one of the greatest alternative CDs ever pressed with their S/T disc, Stone Temple Pilot put out "Core" and the grunge scene was in full swing, taking over the country.

Here comes a little band out of LA with a REALLY bad attitude that is very angry about something. Who would have thought a kid with a lisp, standing on a stage kicking out a "bob Marley wanna be mother f***er" from one of his shows would be where he is today. Yeah, that's Maynard James Keenan-- isn't it strange what 13 years can do?

So here we are, in the past, listening to an album that has since become a classic EP and I'm thinking that this, THIS is what I'm missing on my copy of Lateralus.

Raw, aggressive POWER! This is not the simplistic meanderings of a wanna be "mad at the world" numetal band, this EP has everything. It's technical, the riffs are great and Maynard's lyrics are as insightful as any other disc.

At the time this disc came out, I'm not really sure you could have compared it to anything else going on. While the band NOW wears its King Crimson influence on its sleeve, back when Opiate and Undertow ruled the world... I think you hear more of Henry Rollins' angry social awareness (maybe just a little more cynical than Rollins) and Jimmy Plant more than anything else on this disc, but Zeppelin was never this angry at anything in their lives.

A band that has silently influenced an entire generation of music (much like Queens of the Stone Age/Kyuss) began that journey in 1992 playing warehouses and small clubs and appearing to be almost human. Who would have thought that this EP was the same band that produced Lateralus and Aenima?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 1992 Was a Great Year For Music, July 4, 2006
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Opiate (Audio CD)
Radiohead, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Nirvana, Alice in Chains, Smashing Pumpkins, White Zombie, Rage Against the Machine, Stone Temple Pilots, Red Hot Chili Peppers, etc. were either emerging or at the peaks of their musical prowess. Tool has always stood out as an epic band with epic songs, consistently creating new and innovative albums over the last 14 years. This one is four and a half stars overall. Five stars each for Hush, Cold and Ugly(live), Jerk-off(live) and especially Opiate, and Sweat and Part of Me drag it down a half a notch (at least for me). Solid EP. Buy if you don't have this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 225 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Opiate
Opiate by Tool (Audio CD - 1992)
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.