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  • Opteka HD² Slide Copier for Canon Canon EOS 7D, 6D, 5D, 1DX, 70D, 60D, 50D, 40D, T5i, T4i, T3i, T3, T2i and SL1 Digital SLR Cameras
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Opteka HD² Slide Copier for Canon Canon EOS 7D, 6D, 5D, 1DX, 70D, 60D, 50D, 40D, T5i, T4i, T3i, T3, T2i and SL1 Digital SLR Cameras

by Opteka
| 6 answered questions

List Price: $129.95
Price: $59.00 & FREE Shipping
You Save: $70.95 (55%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by 47th Street Photo.
  • High Definition II close-up optics allow you to transfer slides into digital cameras easily with no loss in quality, and it will actually enhance your pictures!
  • Very easy to attach and use, Works with model listed in the title
  • High Definition II - 2 times the resolution of standard high definition copiers
  • Digital multi-coating greatly reduces the appearance of lens flare and ghosting caused by reflections
  • Removable 10X macro for great all-around macro shots!

Frequently Bought Together

Opteka HD² Slide Copier for Canon Canon EOS 7D, 6D, 5D, 1DX, 70D, 60D, 50D, 40D, T5i, T4i, T3i, T3, T2i and SL1 Digital SLR Cameras + Fotodiox Canon EOS Macro Extension Tube Set for Extreme Close-Ups
Price for both: $73.95

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

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Technical Details

  • Brand Name: Opteka
  • Model: SLDEOSOPT
  • Lens Type: macro

Product Details

  • Shipping Information: View shipping rates and policies
  • ASIN: B004S7C4LY
  • Item model number: SLDEOSOPT
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: September 20, 2010
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Product Description

The Opteka High Definition Digital Duplicator screws into the filter thread of the lens adapter or existing lens. This means it can be connected to almost all digital cameras. The built-in high definition close-up optics allow you to transfer slides into digital cameras easily with no lose in quality. You will actually enhance you pictures!

Customer Reviews

This is a great, simple and affordable solution to covert slides to digital format.
Brittany Franken
It is a time consuming process and, at least in my case, a lot of experimentation was necessary before hitting on a formula that works for most slides.
Max W.
Don't even go the scanner route - it's basically just a camera lens sensor in a light box that takes a picture of your slides.
Matt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Josh on April 2, 2011
Verified Purchase
First things first, this only includes a 58-52 adapter. If you have larger lenses you'll need to order a different adapter. Of course, I found out that using the larger lens actually doesn't take as good of pictures.

From another review here is how I would up getting the best possible pictures of the slides.

- Purchased a Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Camera Lens to attach this to.
- Used my LCD monitor as a light source
- Set Auto focus and white balance, center weighted metering
- Set Aperture priority at f11, ISO 100

This seemed to work the best. I imported them into Adobe Lightroom and cropped them a bit and cleaned them up.

Don't kid yourself, this is not something where you're going to run through 1000's of slides a day. If you do it right and take your time it's going to take a while.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Max W. on September 1, 2013
Verified Purchase
This was purchased so I could duplicate roughly 400 color slides from the 1960s and 1970s. To make a long story short, it works well on my Canon T3 and the 18-55mm kit lens but not at all on my other lenses. But that's okay, it works and I'm getting high quality duplicates of my slides, most of which are 35mm but with a handful of 126 format thrown in. The 126 slides will be cropped a little top and bottom however, so far, that has not been an issue with those that I wished to copy. Also, many of the 126 slides were in plastic (versus cardboard) mounts which fit very tightly in the tray, but they did fit and with care could be extracted with no damage.

This device is NOT for the faint of heart or those who want to do mass duplications in a short amount of time. It is a time consuming process and, at least in my case, a lot of experimentation was necessary before hitting on a formula that works for most slides. I position the camera on a small bean bag type pillow and aim it toward an all white computer screen on my laptop and use a remote trigger. I've had good luck using f16 on the AV setting, set for daylight, and letting the camera determine the exposure. Two very dark underexposed slides that I thought were way beyond recovery were recovered this way. Some of my old slides were lightning time exposures and those required several exposures, one on the AV setting and the rest were guestimates on the Manual setting at f11 and varied times. The quick preview provided by the Canon after each shot let me know if I was getting close to something usable.

My biggest complaint with this device is the white opaque glass it uses.
Read more ›
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Loadmaster on March 28, 2013
Verified Purchase
Tips for best use: Get rid of the frosted plastic screen, and use a brightly lit whiteboard a few feet from the camera. Old and plastic slide mounts are a tight fit, so ue care when inserting them into the slide; you may have to the one best fitting slot of the three. Since the duplicator is mounted on your lens, it will rotate while the camera autofocuses; once you have the focus set, turn the lens to manual focus; you will also have to realign the duplicator, probably several times, for best results. Remember to set auto-white balance, especially if you're using incandescent lights. You will have to crop, and possibly rotate, the images you take, so use a fairly high resolution to begin with (4 Mpx or better). I use a very stopped-down aperature (F/11 or more) so that the entire surface of the slide is in focus; this generally requires long exposure times (1/4 sec or more), so be sure to keep the whole arrangement still during the shot (I use a tripod mount for the whole thing). Each slide is different, so it's a good idea to take multiple bracketed shots of each (varying the exposure from too dark to too light); during later editing, you can choose the best shot. Also remember to remove the dust and specks from the slides; some of these you can edit out later, but it's best to start with as clean a slide as you can. Above all, remember that getting good results will take a fair amount of time and effort.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Matt on February 21, 2013
Verified Purchase
The product is well made. It took a little fussing to get it threaded on my lens, but once on it is solid. I don't much like the end piece where the slides go in to be captured - in theory, you are supposed to adjust this with each slide capture. After experimenting, I ended up using an incandescent light, and just set the camera in front of it on a table. On either side of the slide end piece, I stacked some of my little kids' puzzle pieces such that when I passed the slide carrier through, and allowed my camera to autofocus on the slide, the end piece floats as the lens rotates such that the slide is still square in the viewer. Like I said, once you get a system down, you can capture slides relatively fast. I'd say it takes me about 1 to 1.5 hours to capture 30 slides - and that includes brushing off any dust on each slide, capture the slides, uploading to the computer, and auto-correcting in PhotoStudio. I only have a 55mm lens, so I have to crop the resulting captures. I'm going to try out a zoom lens at some point to get more resolution, but even with a smaller lens, the pixels are roughly the size of the film grains on the slides.

I'm looking forward to capturing all kinds of old family slides with this product. I tried a slide scanner from Veho and it was terrible. You have much more control over what you are doing in using your SLR camera to digitally capture slides. Don't even go the scanner route - it's basically just a camera lens sensor in a light box that takes a picture of your slides. This product is much better, and the sensor in your SLR is more likely to be a superior sensor.
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