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Oregon at Work: 1859-2009 Paperback – April 1, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Ooligan Press (April 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932010270
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932010275
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,466,915 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

In this collection of vintage-photograph postcards, Tom Fuller, Christy Van Heukelem, and the Mission Mill Museum explore the cityas past.

More About the Author

Tom Fuller is an author, pastor, and communications professional who lives in Oregon. Tom has contributed to and co-written several books, including four on the history of Oregon and its communities.

Tom is the Communications Manager for the Oregon Employment Department. He also pastors Calvary Chapel Newberg and is author of Bible Study, a web application for the Joomla Content Management System.

Tom was born in the Berkeley, California and grew up in Chico, California. He attended the University of California Los Angeles and graduated with honors with a BA in Speech Communications from UC Santa Barbara.

Tom worked as a television reporter for KTVL-TV in Medford from 1981-1990. He then worked as a reporter for KGW-TV until 2001, when he transitioned to the state of Oregon.

Tom is the recipient of several major awards including an Emmy(r), a national award from the National Broadcast Association for Community Affairs, an Associated Press award, and is a two time recipient of the Frank Waller Public Relations Award.

Tom's most interesting story was with Keiko the Killer whale. Tom traveled to Iceland four times to follow Keiki ("Free Willy") and calls Iceland "the moon with moss."

Tom makes his home in Newberg. He is married and has three grown children, all married.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By CME on April 11, 2009
Format: Paperback
Oregon at Work transports the reader back in time as they learn about what it was like to work in the 1850's, the 1900's, the 1950's and today. The authors skillfully weave personal stories and photographs of 20 pioneer families with historical research and economic statistics to give readers an accurate picture of the life of working Oregonians. Meet the founder of the town of Carlton, a farmer/legislator from 1862, an End of the Trail resort owner, the one room schoolhouse teacher, and the blacksmith. Then jump ahead 50 years and meet their descendants. As the reader moves through time they see a reoccurring theme, Oregonians are strong and resilient people. This book offers readers an opportunity to be encouraged by where we were and hope for where we are going. I strongly recommend it.
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Format: Paperback
Oregon at Work manages to be extremely informative while being equally interesting and enthralling. The text covers its respective decades by focusing on telling the stories of many real, Oregonian/Oregon transplant pioneers and innovators. This method of storytelling relates details of the employment situation at each given time, while keeping the reader interested and invested in the real, human 'characters.'

These remarkable stories of Oregon's past are enhanced by the large collection of photographs that accompany the text. Contemporary photos of the workers, their families, the landscape, and their places of work were obtained from the families of those whose stories are told in this book. Other photos help detail the landscape and economic climate of each decade, as well.

Overall, this book is an excellent resource concerning Oregon's industries, economy, and workforce from 1859 on. Historically accurate and beautifully illustrated with relevant photos, this book is enjoyable just to read for pleasure, and can also assist one doing research or desiring to learn more about Oregon history.
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By CAH on January 26, 2010
Format: Paperback
A beautifully designed and written book on the evolution of Oregon, its industries, and its workers. The many historical photos and informational sidebars enhance a text that is a smooth and engaging read, without the dryness or stuffiness one might expect in a nonfiction book on this particular subject. The human aspect remains at the heart of things. I highly recommend this book!
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