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The Origin and Early Diversification of Land Plants - A Cladistic Study (Smithsonian Series in Comparative Evolutionary Biology) Paperback – August 17, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-1560987291 ISBN-10: 1560987294

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 441 pages
  • Publisher: Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press (August 17, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1560987294
  • ISBN-13: 978-1560987291
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 1.1 x 11.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,679,474 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

[R]emarkable . . . a treasure of organized information about specific taxa and characters; well-posed phylogenetic questions addressed by the analyses of taxa and traits whose choices are carefully justified; syntheses of molecular and morphological evidence; evolutionary scenarios explaining biogeographic patterns, morphological variation, and life history patterns -- in short, a reference book with a point of view. . . . An important guidepost for future comparative studies in botany. (Quarterly Review Of Biology)

This excellent and detailed book stands as a model for how to approach the study of evolution, and is an essential addition to the bookshelves of anyone interested in the scope and diversification of life. (Nature)

[T]he style and precision with which the information is presented and illustrated is beyond reproach. . . . [T]his book is, without a doubt, a major contribution to the literature of plant science, both as a source of information and as a challenge to future generations of plant scientists. (Tree)

[T]his volume will become a landmark in the literature on land plant evolution and remain so for many years to come. . . . The authors do a good job of bringing order to a chaotic field. (Science)

This book is a must for professional botanists, but weekend naturalists should read it as well, just to get a feel for the true wonders that lie out there, behind what is immediately visible. Seek it out and buy it -- it will set you on a new plane of inquiry. (New Scientist)

[R]emarkable . . . a treasure of organized information about specific taxa and characters; well-posed phylogenetic questions addressed by the analyses of taxa and traits whose choices are carefully justified; syntheses of molecular and morphological evidence; evolutionary scenarios explaining biogeographic patterns, morphological variation, and life history patterns -- in short, a reference book with a point of view. . . . An important guidepost for future comparative studies in botany.... (Quarterly Review Of Biology)

[T]he style and precision with which the information is presented and illustrated is beyond reproach. . . . [T]his book is, without a doubt, a major contribution to the literature of plant science, both as a source of information and as a challenge to future generations of plant scientists.... (Tree)

[T]his volume will become a landmark in the literature on land plant evolution and remain so for many years to come. . . . The authors do a good job of bringing order to a chaotic field..... (Science)

About the Author

Paul Kenrick is a researcher in the Department of Paleontology at the Natural History Museum in London.

Peter R. Crane is the director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
This is a comprehensive and well written book about the evolutionary relationships among early vascular land plants. The problem with this book is that it is incomplete as far as the actual biology of these plants. The authors seem to spend endless time going over all the various features of these ancient plants but never once tell us why these features might be biologically important. Also, they analyze their plants in cladistic piece meal, that is, they never provide a single global cladistic analysis, which as far as I am concerned is a major methodological problem. This book is for the expert, not for students. And it is certainly not for the average reader.
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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 13, 1999
Format: Paperback
This is a comprehensive and well written book about the evolutionary relationships among early vascular land plants. The problem with this book is that it is incomplete as far as the actual biology of these plants. The authors seem to spend endless time going over all the various features of these ancient plants but never once tell us why these features might be biologically important. Also, they analyze their plants in cladistic piece meal, that is, they never provide a single global cladistic analysis, which as far as I am concerned is a major methodological problem. This book is for the expert, not for students. And it is certainly not for the average reader.
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