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  • Original Lost Elektra Sessions
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Original Lost Elektra Sessions


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Audio CD, July 18, 1995
$24.99 $3.48

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 18, 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Elektra / Wea
  • ASIN: B000003473
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #199,922 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
2. Just To Be With You
3. Help Me
4. Hate To See You Go
5. Poor Boy

Editorial Reviews

Assembled by producer Paul Rothchild shortly before his death, this really is the band's debut album that they recorded in 1964 yet never released, with only two of the songs appearing on their maiden Paul Butterfield Blues Band release!

Customer Reviews

Great, classic blues.
Docendo Discimus
This collection of early Butterfield recordings was even better than what I expected.
Barry Cowan
Well worth the listen.
JS

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Docendo Discimus on October 4, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Even though this page only lists five tracks, "The Original Lost Electra Sessions" is not an EP, it's a 19-track CD.
All but one of these 19 tracks were recorded in December, 1964, as Paul Butterfield's projected first LP, but the results were (inexplicably) scrapped and replaced by the band's official self-titled debut, cut a few months later.
With both Sam Lay, Elvin Bishop and Mike Bloomfield already onboard, these sessions are very similar in feel to the Paul Butterfield Blues Band's first album. It's perhaps a little bit rawer in production and performance, but not really worse or different than what ended up on the actual debut LP.
Dedicated primarily to electric Chicago blues standards, it opens with a somewhat rushed take on "Good Morning Little Schoolgirl", followed by a great "Just To Be With You" with some sublime harp playing by Paul Butterfield.
Butterfield also does a pretty good Sonny Boy Williamson (II) on a faithful rendition of "Help Me", and there are many more highlights, including an excellent rendition of the classic blues shuffle "Poor Boy", a slow, smouldering "It Hurts Me Too", an alternate version of the fine original "Our Love Is Drifting", a great, swinging "Take Me Back Baby", Jimmy Rogers' "That's All Right", and yet another Tampa Red-tune, "Love Her With A Feeling".
The band also lay down a really good version of Jimmy Oden's "Goin' Down Slow", and the originals "Lovin' Cup" and the fiery instrumental "Nut Popper #1" are excellent.
Virtually everything here is worth a listen, actually. It's not highly original, but The Paul Butterfield Blues Band's versions of these classic Chicago blues tunes are among the best and most convincing blues music ever waxed by a (primarily) white blues band.
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59 of 62 people found the following review helpful By happydogpotatohead VINE VOICE on June 5, 2000
Format: Audio CD
It's hard to believe that this album was scrapped. A lot of bands put out albums that were much worse than this. One has to wonder if Paul Rothschild should have just taken a few valiums and put this out at the time it was recorded, because this is very, very good.
This is a terrific document of a band of seriously dedicated guys playing the music they love, as authentically as they can. These guys weren't kidding; they paid their dues on the South Side of Chicago and were accepted as peers by none other than Muddy Waters. The performances here are raw but not sloppy, and the band is as tight as a tick. Most of the songs on here are played at a quick clip, but there's a lot of bite and venom in these performances, an air of urgency not dissimilar to something you hear on Buddy Guy's early recordings.
It's sad to think that the Yardbirds got so much praise (and still do) as being white interpreters of the blues, when this collection shows clearly that the Butterfield Blues Band was much, much better than anything the British blues movement would offer for several years. Why the Yardbirds got the press and historical props and the Butterfield Blues Band doesn't is a total mystery. Maybe they didn't wear enough paisley.
There is no paisley or patchouli on this one. It's just hard, tough blues, nasty, with teeth in it. Forget that half the band was white guys and dump every preconception you have about hippies, white blues, etc., and listen to this for what it is; a seriously cool recording of a very hot band hitting their stride.
Finally, I want to add that the recording quality of this album is not "execrable." It sounds every bit as good as any other album recorded in 1964 (! ) and a whole lot better than most. As a matter of fact, I think this is a much better produced record than anything the Yardbirds ever did. It's certainly much more authentic blues. A great document of an unjustly forgotten group.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By "wednightprayermeeting" on November 5, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This is some of the earliest Butterfield available. The takes on this album were scrapped (or thought to be scrapped) for the more produced tunes that appear on first album. In my opinion, a lot of these takes are better than what appears on the first album. Butterfield's rendition of "Just To Be With You" (Muddy Waters)is absolutely awe-inspiring. Jimmy Rodgers' "That's Alright" is as good as the original, although different. And Little Walter's "Everything Is Gonna Be Alright" is a jam. All of these takes are amazing, and definately not to be missed.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By E. Joy on January 2, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I have heard the white vs. black bluesman argument for years and years. I've always felt that it isn't the color of the skin that's important when it comes to the music but rather the soul of the musician. Given that, this is a great blues album by a band of soulful bluesmen. Butterfields harp is as hot as ever and the guitars of Bloomfield and Bishop are the epitome of the blues. The Paul Butterfield Blues Band were one of the greatest blues bands ever assembled and this recording is evidence of that fact. My only question is how this music has gone unheard for all of these years?
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By bobtec on March 31, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This album is a rare, and precious gem that fits quite comfortably between the first album, and East-West. The people at Elektra discovered that sometimes true gold can be found without digging in a gold mine. And they struck real gold, not fools gold. And on the list of gems are songs like Spoonful, Everything's Gonna Be Alright (which I haven't heard since the release of Woodstock 2), Mellow Down Easy (the only repeat out of 19 songs), Rock Me, and Poor Boy. This is not only to be added to the Essentials list, but the top 2 must haves have now become three.
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