"Original Works For Theremin": Music By Martinu, Grainger, Schillinger, Kavna, Komarov And Others

June 22, 1999 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
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1:51
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2:48
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1:29
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14:23
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3:54
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 22, 1999
  • Label: Mode
  • Copyright: (C) 1999 Mode
  • Total Length: 1:07:16
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0010WO0WQ
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #164,544 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Steve Bryson on April 29, 2002
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a great album. I particularly like Lydia Kavina's original compositions, where the Theremin is clearly the ideal instrument.
Kavina's use of the Theremin is much more effective than Clara Rockmore's. While Rockmore's recordings show skill and ability, I cannot imagine anyone saying "yes, the Theremin is the ideal instrument" for the music on Rockmore's album. Speaking as an electronic musician who loves to explore the frontiers of music, I feel that under Rockmore the Theremin's appeal was more for its curiosity than for its appropriateness to the music.
With Lydia Kavina we have a different situation entirely. The music is ideal for the Theremin, and many of the compositions (particularly Kavina's) have real emotional power. I cannot imagine these pieces played with any other instrument (besides a synthesizer programmed to sound like a theremin).
Lydia Kavina is exploring a new musical space, appropriate to the Theremin. This album gives a fine sampling of that space, hopefully hinting at more to come.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By David J Candy on May 19, 2000
Format: Audio CD
After listening to this disque repeatedly, I would now dare put forth the notion that Lydia Kavina may have proven to the world that she is the greatest thereminist of all - even better than the legendary Clara Rockmore.
Whilst Rockmore may be the better performer in a solo/piano accompaniment setting, she very rarely played in an emsemble setting with the rest of the 'serious' instruments found in the orchestra.
Kavina's real strength is in her ability to successfully mesh the unique sound of the thereminvox with other orchestral instruments. Her rendition of Bohuslav Martinu's "Fantasy For Thereminvox, Oboe, Piano and Strings" (the second-most overlooked and forgotten piece of classical-electronic music - the first being, of course, Darius Milhaiud's "Suite for Ondes-Martenot And Piano") is truly incredible.
For those of you listeners who appreciate how well the oboe and viola work and sound together, Ms. Kavina creates the same effect with the thereminvox and oboe in Martinu's work. Unlike Rockmore's novelty-sound in "The Art Of The Theremin", Kavina makes the thereminvox work as capable and as successful as any of the more 'convential' instruments found on the disque.
The music featured on this disque is as bright and fresh as "The Art Of The Theremin" sounds like muzak for the funeral home.
If you need further proof of the ability of this performer, then check out Kavina's brilliant work on the "Ed Wood" soundtrack.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A. S. Templeton on February 27, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Miss Kavina is a very talented thereminist, certainly up there with the likes of Clara Rockmore and Samuel J. Hoffman.
Nevertheless her choices in repertoire for this CD are mostly forgettable. Free Music #1 for four theremins (1936) was no doubt very avant garde at the time, but it's no more listenable now than then.
Also the timbre of her instrument in most of the pieces varies from overtone-less sinewave to drinking-straw nasal buzz, with nothing pleasant in between. Absent are the sweet, second-harmonic and pitch/time-variant harmonics that make Rockmore's ancient thermionic custom machine so nice to listen to.
But nevertheless Miss Kavina is to be applauded for helping keep the theremin visible in the electronic music field, with her emphasis on live performance and traditional musicianship, rebuffing the studioism and MIDI-ization of the last three decades.
Definitely a worthy addition to all theremin enthusiasts' CD shelves.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tommy DOG on June 22, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Lydia Kavina "Music from the Ether original works for Theremin" marks a new moment for the instruments history. Far removed from Theremin-splotation, B-movie Science fiction soundtracks and novelty, this recording showcases more then just a warbling whistle, this is a second debute for the instrument. Beautiful, colorful and above all tasteful.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Robert Badger on May 18, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The music world is not exactly teeming with theremin virtuosi. Quite simply, the theremin is one of the most difficult of all electronic instruments to master. Imagine an instrument which is played in thin air. The thereminist has no contact with a keyboard or a fingerboard. This instrument is played by moving one's hands close to or away from two antennae. One antenna controls pitch. The other controls volume. It is a terribly unforgiving instrument. It demands that the player be able to remain perfectly still, apart from his or her hands. Slight movements of the body can and will affect pitch.
Lydia Kavina is a master of the theremin. Very few have ever mastered it on her level. She was taught by the inventor of the theremin himself, the late Leon Theremin (Lev Termen). Since the death of Clara Rockmore, it is good to see someone continuing on in promoting this most magical and difficult of instruments.
This recording offers many treats for the listener. Chief among them is the Martinu Fantasy. For those who admire Martinu's work, this CD offers a recording of a rarely heard work of Martinu's.
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By Chin Chih Yang on April 19, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The album "Music from the Ether: Original Works for Theremin" exhibited to me the wide range of possibilities of electronic music, other than the noise, robotic, futuristic music that is hard for me to understand and appreciate. In the album, the theremin, electrical music and orchestral ensemble are neatly blended together. The "Fantasia" in the album would be the best example of such synthesis. In the piece, the theremin was primarily used for the main rhythm of the piece, while the orchestral ensemble was bringing into play the accompany rhythm and background music. The piece has everything that resembled classical orchestra, other than having the electronic instrument the theremin in the orchestra. In the piece the theremin successfully blended into the orchestra; for those who do not know what they heard, it would be easy to have mistaken the theremin as a violin or one of the wind instruments.
In contrast to the soothing nature of the piece" Fantasia", the last piece in the album, "Voice Of Theremin", appeared to be something totally different. Rather than using the theremin with the orchestral ensemble through out the piece, the piece appeared to ensemble the usual ideal of computer/ electrical music most of the time. The use of a bird singing as well as the human voices in the piece also brings about much resemblance of the style of music, musique concrete, a style that takes common noises from the real world and applying it on musical compositions. With the addition of tape work, the pieces sounded like and resembled much of the characteristics that one can find in the computer music of the 1960s with the application of synthesizer and sequencer. For almost two thirds of the piece, the main rhythm did not seem to have existed neither with the theremin nor the electrical/ tape music.
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