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  • New Orleans Rhythm Kings and Jelly Roll Morton
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New Orleans Rhythm Kings and Jelly Roll Morton


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Audio CD, July 1, 1991
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Dawes Dawes


1. Eccentric
2. Farewell Blues
3. Discontented Blues
4. Bugle Call Rag
5. Panama
6. Tiger Rag
7. Livery Stable Blues
8. Oriental
9. Sweet Lovin' Man
10. That's A Plenty
11. Shimmeshawabble
12. Weary Blues
13. That Da Da Strain
14. Wolverine Blues
15. Maple Leaf Rag
16. Tin Roof Blues
17. Sobbin' Blues
18. Marguerite
19. Angry
20. Clarinet Marmalade (1st Take)
See all 27 tracks on this disc

Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 1, 1991)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Milestone
  • ASIN: B000000XW4
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #159,452 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Walter Five VINE VOICE on August 20, 2002
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I don't want to over-emphasise the above, as the New Orleans Rhythm Kings (NORK) stand on their own throughout 3/4ths of this CD without the able assistance of Mssr. Ferdinand (Jelly-Roll) Morton, but this is an incredibly notable and undeniably historic team-up. The NORK have been largely dismissed as (pardon the pun) pale echoes of King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band, but I beg to differ with that opinion. Play this CD. Hear this incredible band. Compare them to any of their contemporaries in 1922-23, the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, Kid Ory's Band, King Oliver's--they hold their own. It is true, that the NORK recording dates which *follow* these are simply not as good, as tight, as together, but those were *not* sessions played by the original line-up presented here--THESE really cook!
Mssr. Morton is to be found on the cuts "Sobbin' Blues", Clarinet Marmalade (1st and 2nd takes), Mr. Jelly Lord (2nd and 4th takes), London Blues, and Milenberg Joys (1st &4th takes). Predating his "Red Hot Peppers" band by three years, these sides find the Jelly Roll King in fine form, a component and team player, comfortable in his role as a sideman. Not as florid or flamboyant as his Piano Rolls from the same period, to be sure, Morton gives enough to make his presence known, without overplaying.
In a sane world, our children would be studying this disc in 6th Grade Musical History.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Peter Acebal on December 26, 2001
Format: Audio CD
If some customer has read any of my reviews they notice I give out 5 stars often,but the stars don't come easily with me and this superb set is an example of essential music earning its stars;the NORK were the next critical white band in early jazz (after the Original Dixieland Jazz Band)and they display already a sense of collective character all their own (listen to their rendering of the ODJB's "Clarinet Marmalade" for a starter);the digital mastering on this CD is basically very good (although a bit too 'hazy' in spots) but that cannot detract the value of this wonderful set PLUS this set includes the 1923 sides the NORK recorded with Jelly Roll Morton and it is indeed a revelation to see how that notorious genius could put his ego aside and prove an ace team-player! Enjoy and Replay to your ear's and heart's content!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Peter Acebal on December 21, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I first had these recordings on LP some twenty-five (!) years ago so this CD came as a revelation to me - The NORK were a direct descendant of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band as the next most significant white jazz band and as such they directly influenced Bix Beiderbecke and the Wolverines two years later who in turn influenced scores of white jazzmen;but the NORK had a firmer command of the African-American Creole passion for polyphony and syncopation and in cornetist Paul Mares and trombonist George Brunies there are two first-rate jazz stylists;the inclusion here of their records with Jelly Roll Morton only emphasizes how far the NORK transcended the color lines.This set is a critical purchase,...no serious jazz lover should do without this excellantly presented set.Jazz Lovers dig in and Enjoy!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By CJBx7 on January 25, 2008
Format: Audio CD
The New Orleans Rhythm Kings provided a much truer reflection of the spirit of New Orleans jazz then the Original Dixieland Jazz Band. Instead of emphasizing the novelty aspects of the music, the NORK performed with sincerity, lots of heart, and tons of rhythmic drive, especially on the early numbers with the banjoist. When I listen to this music it reminds me of early rock & roll - not the instrumentation, of course, but the sheer drive and youthful enthusiasm of the players involved. The whole set contains great music, but I must admit my favorite part involves just the front line of cornetist Paul Mares, clarinetist Leon Ropollo and trombonist George Brunies.
The highlights? Lots! Their fantastically swinging take on "Tiger Rag," complete with Ropollo's clarinet solo, considered to be the first truly improvised jazz solo on record; their ferocious take on "Bugle Call Rag," their introduction of the song "That's A Plenty," and the wild drum work on "Maple Leaf Rag" are all outstanding. To me, however, my favorite moment if "Tin Roof Blues," a lovely, lovely song taken at a leisurely pace, not too fast and not too slow, conjuring all the majesty and charm of old New Orleans wrapped in bittersweet reveries, full of melancholy, joy, and timeless grace. Paul Mares acquits himself very well on this song; his solo is concise, melodic and very moving. This song stands outside of time. They also had some great collaborations with Jelly Roll Morton, particularly on his song "Mr Jelly Lord," which is a really cool song! Very distinctive. Anyone with a serious interest in the roots of jazz should check this CD out.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By bukhtan on February 15, 2006
Format: Audio CD
"When I first began my work, 'jazz' was a stunt," said Duke Ellington. To hear the kind of "stunt" music he had in mind, listen to the Original Dixieland Jazz Band. To hear the earliest real jazz music, in bearable sound, listen to the first records of the NORK. As their trombonist Brunies said himself, these white musicians tried to copy the black bands, and though he also admits they didn't altogether succeed, they tried hard. And came up with a music comparable to the King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band sides recorded the next year. Compared to NORK and King Oliver, the ODJB are indeed a 'stunt', like a child's windup toy, a pack of mechanical chimps whacking away, saleable because they were white. For music from that kind of stuff, people had to wait for Bix Beiderbecke, who could coax music from that jingle machine business the way Louis Armstrong could coax it out of cheap pop songs.

For other pre-Oliver jazz music, try the June 1922 Kid Ory 78's, with Mutt Carey, available on the first Kid Ory Chronogical Classics. But be prepared for hideous sound.
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