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Orphan's Lament Import

4.5 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Import, July 15, 2008
Audio, Cassette, November 23, 1994
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 15, 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Phantom Sound & Vision
  • ASIN: B001BTZN24
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Pharoah S. Wail VINE VOICE on January 13, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I am writing this to refute the previous review that called this "Mongol techno music". "Techno" would seem to hint that this is electronic music that just happens to also have Tuvan-style vocals. That is 100% not the case! The music on this cd is completely acoustic and played on traditional and non-traditional Tuvan instruments, and the previous reviewer has no familiarity with Nepalese music, because it does not sound like this, nor does this music have any rap-like qualities. I also disagree with the "official review" that called this "musically naive at first listen". There is nothing naive about the level of musicianship and/or vocal ability that the men on this cd possess.

Tuvan throat-singing is really something to behold. Whereas Tibetan Buddhist-style throat-singing seems to stop and start while already in the overtone, Tuvan throat-singing usually starts in a normal voice (one note) and then in mid note or phrase the singers will shift into the overtones, and their actual overtones sound vastly different than those of the Tibetans as well. In short, this is some of the most beautifully ethereal-yet-rustic music ever recorded.

A couple (of the many) standout tracks are STEPPE and KHOMUZ MEDLEY.
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Format: Audio CD
Tuvan throat-singing techniques allow a singer to sing two notes at once, a low drone and a higher melody made of the overtones of the low note. Huun-Huur-Tu specializes in old Tuvan songs that were in danger of being forgotten during the long Soviet reign. This album is an improvement over their first album, "60 Horses in My Herd", by adding Anatoli Kuular's strong tenor to the band. Kuular has the best voice I've heard in Tuvan music, and he and Kaigal-ool Khovalyg provide a great one-two punch here. My favorite song is "Aa-shuu Dekei-oo"; other highlights are the "Exile's Song" and "Agitator". Every Tuvan album includes some khomuz jaw harp, and that's usually the low point of the album for me--the medley of khomuz here is perhaps the most listenable I've heard. The instrumentation is mostly simplified variations on violins and banjos, and the playing is pretty basic.
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Format: Audio CD
A work of well-produced art, contemporary offerings in traditional Tuvan styles, not an ethnomusicological assay. Its 16 pieces in styles varying from unison Kargyraa chants to political songs to khomus ("Jews' harp") solos provide a tour-de-force of Tuvan styles designed for listening pleasure and wonderment. Master khoomigch Kaigal-ool Khovalyg's deeply touching igil (Tuvan viol) playing is (as on "60 Horses") a real highlight of the album. His frequent vocal solos in all styles, and those of the sweet-voiced Anatoli Kuular, joined by Mergen Mongush for one sygyt cut, help place this album among the two or three "must-have"'s for anyone who *enjoys* authentic Tuvan music.
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Format: Audio CD
Time and again I go back to this album. The music is uplifting, enchanting, and spiritual to me. My favorite is "Yellow Trotter" with the sounds of nature coming in a close second.

Once, years ago, I had the opportunity to see them in concert. They are delightful to see in person and at work. Hopefully they shall tour again.

A must for lovers of world music, any music, or if you have never heard music... start here.

M...
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By Dan F on February 26, 2016
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Help! I loved this album. It's basic, no pretensions. Please give me suggestions on what to buy next. Are there any better? I'm looking for raw, natural talent - no studio stunts. Thanks in advance.
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Format: Audio CD
I believe the documentary Genghis Blues has largely been responsible for exposing many to Tuvan throat singing. For that I am eternally grateful. Although my hope in contemporary music has lately diminished, it has been renewed by this unlikely source.

The track "Orphan's Lament" is absolutely incredible. Whenever I play the track I can't help but be completely transfixed by the gently moving instrumentation struggling to keep the mood grounded. The vocals high and lows move one so deeply it almost becomes painful not knowing what he is singing about.
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Format: Audio CD
These songs transport me to an ancient time and place that is beyond words. The song "Steppe" sounds like it was written hundreds or even thousands of years ago, before The Pyramids, before The Silk Road, before almost anything but living in caves. It hovers around a root note, with instruments playing notes close to the root, but never too far away. Really gets to me.
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