Buy New
$8.96
Qty:1
  • List Price: $9.95
  • Save: $0.99 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Orpheus and the Roots of Platonism Paperback – December 1, 2011


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.96
$7.21 $7.77


Frequently Bought Together

Orpheus and the Roots of Platonism + Philosophy and Theurgy in Late Antiquity + The Golden Chain: An Anthology of Pythagorean and Platonic Philosophy (Treasures of the World's Religions)
Price for all three: $47.73

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 118 pages
  • Publisher: The Matheson Trust (December 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1908092076
  • ISBN-13: 978-1908092076
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #55,169 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Mysterium Ineffable on November 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
It has always been something of a battle to understand the complex relationship between the work of Socrates and Plato and the religious context of the Greek religious world which they inhabited. This is primarily due to the fact that we are fed utter nonsense about them in the corporate academies, nonsense that flows downstream to the common folk and pollutes even the more noble attempts to appreciate their work. The desire to see in these figures a kind of evolution from the befuddling superstitions projected back onto the ancient religious world, an evolution that makes its decisive break with Aristotle and which is then inherited by the Europeans a millennium later--a millennium spent mostly dormant in the prison of Islam--who then labored with it until they birthed together the modern world which in turn produced one simple irrefutable truth--namely, the only truth we can know is that we can't know truth (if ever there was a reason to question our collective sanity this must be it), is too intimidating and is too interwoven into the fabric of assumptions of which the modern mentality is comprised.

Whatever the causes and effects of this stupefying historical phenomenon it is enough that a handful of philosophers have kept the torch of real sophia lifted above the dark miasma of misosophy. Uzdavinys, one such torch-bearer, has brought together many diverse sources, many of them extremely obscure, to forge together a nearly comprehensive portrait of the historical and trans-historical relationship between the sacred and the Platonic tradition; between the Orphic and Apollonian mysteries and the work of Plato and Socrates.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By VeritasluxMea on October 22, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I briefly knew Algis before he died, his intellect superceded his dead mentor, Dr. AK Coomaraswamy in most areas, which is saying A LOT. Out of 1000s of books on Orphism, Theurgy, and genuine 'know their stuff' metaphysicians, this book is a TOP 20 without question.

Genuine metaphysicians like this havent existed but 1 or 2 each century all the way back to the golden age of illumination (200-600 CE). Algis was one of them, he threw his life upon the quest for Hellenic and Orphic Illumination. I own every book ever written on this topic, regardless of cost, and I dont speak lightly about genuinely GOOD books, this is one of those.

It is utterly impossible to buy this condensed straight to the point book and be disappointed or let down, or uninspired. OWN IT, period.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mindaugas on December 31, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The newest post-mortem book of Professor Algis Uzdavinys brings us to the myth of Orpheus. As always, the author seeks to deepen his and our knowledge of philosophy. Being a Platonist, he's not an ordinary one. So, we've got this thread going through at least some of his books which shows us Platonism in a different light. Strongly recommended for all who want to understand the roots of it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Santiago Herrera on October 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Clearly a master on the subject. Not many books show the relationship between Orpheus and Platonism in such a concise and clear way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an amazing book that sheds light on the ambiguity of the Orphic beliefs. It shows how it seem to have started in Egypt, bu the main source of what we know are in the Platonic dialogues. It was amazing to see the circle of birth, life and death; the punishment or reward in between, and how Plato thought that if you were a philosopher for three life times in a row you would become the God that was trapped in your flesh. Once one would have achieved apotheosis then at the end of that life time they would be able to dine in the Tower of Cronus with the rest of the Gods.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?