Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $1.99 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Other Destinies: Understa... has been added to your Cart
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Other Destinies: Understanding the American Indian Novel (American Indian Literature and Critical Studies Series) Paperback – September 15, 1994


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.96
$13.95 $1.71

Frequently Bought Together

Other Destinies: Understanding the American Indian Novel (American Indian Literature and Critical Studies Series) + Winter in the Blood (Penguin Classics)
Price for both: $30.27

Buy the selected items together
  • Winter in the Blood (Penguin Classics) $12.31

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Series: American Indian Literature and Critical Studies Series (Book 3)
  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press (September 15, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0806126736
  • ISBN-13: 978-0806126739
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,524,379 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

A Choctaw-Cherokee-Irish novelist and professor of literature, Owens provides an important insider's perspective on ten Native American novelists. Beginning with the Cherokee author John Rollin Ridge, whose 1854 novel, The Life and Times of Joaquin Murieta, was the first American Indian novel to be published, and moving on to contemporary authors such as Louise Erdrich and Gerald Vizenor, Owens identifies a common theme among these writers. All ten are mixed-blood Indians exploring their search for identity in two worlds, where "the individual who would 'be' Indian rather than 'play' Indian is faced with an overwhelming challenge." Owens shows how each author dealt with this marginalization through his or her characters, moving from Ridge's angry masquerade as a Mexican American bandit to Vizenor's celebration of "crossbloods" as shape-shifting tricksters mediating between two worlds. Drawing heavily on Russian critic Mikhail Bakhtin's theories, Owens presents a well-written, jargon-free book on an often-ignored genre of American literature.
- Lisa A. Mitten, Univ. of Pittsburgh Lib.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Louis Owens, who is of Choctaw-Cherokee-Irish descent, is Professor of English at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of several books, including Other Destinies: Understanding the American Indian Novel and the novels The Sharpest Sight and Bone Game, all published by the University of Oklahoma Press.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
Other Destinies: Understanding the American Indian Novel is solid, a real powerhouse of thoughtful readings and appropriate critical theory applied to highlight the diverse stories analyzed in this text. Owens examines the novels of Mourning Dove, Ridge, McNickle, Momaday, Dorris, Erdrich, Silko, and Vizenor while using an accessible voice and with generous notes, index, and bibliography. In his analysis he visits many of the social and political struggles each writer has encountered in their lives and represented in their writing. Other Destinies is not intended to serve the political ends of issues such as sovereignty, though it does examine the complex political climates in which these works were written. The biographical information on the political circumstances influencing Mourning Dove and John Rollin Ridge are particularly interesting for this reason. There are a few critics, both Indian and non-Indian, who wish that Owens had chosen different baseline issues, (their own political issues), to highlight in his critical examination of these novels. Owens chose, however, what he knows best and what was important to these particular texts.
For decades, centuries, the will of white America has largely expressed the desire of the politically powerful to erase American Indians from the North American landscape. Today even, if one views the efforts of such as Slade Gorton, the senator from Washington State, the effort continues. And in many ways, they have been successful. More than 50 percent of those who identify as American Indians do not live on what is today considered "Indian land," and too many have lost all contact with the land and cultures and stories of their people.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 17, 1996
Format: Paperback
Other Destinies: Understanding the American Indian Novel stands alone in its completelook at the history of fiction written by Native American writers. Though(fortunately) there are now so many Indian writers that this book could not include them all, Owens give a good account of many who broke new ground in their relatively recent day of producing literary fiction. Including N.Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, Michael Dorris, Gerald Vizenor, Leslie Marmon Silko and others, this text, written by Dr. Owens, himself Native American of Choctaw, Cherokee and Irish descent, holds Indian texts to the same literary standards as other modern literature and finds them of equal quality. Though authoritative, this is a very readable text which received a good review in the New York Times Review of Books. Owens also writes good fiction, and could have included his own works in here, but didn't. See Wolfsong, Sharpest Sight, Bone Game and Nightland.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 14 people found the following review helpful By James Stripes on December 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
I've been struggling with this book since it was first published. I've seen it influence dozens of other scholars who, for the most part, rave about its merits. When I read this book for the first time I was deeply immersed in study of many of the books Owens writes about. My initial experince in reading the book was quite mixed. I would find myself saying "right on" in one paragraph, followed by "nonsense" in the next.
Louis Owens writes well and communicates a perspective regarding the creative work of Native American Indian writers that is widely shared by many who study these writers professionally. His own novels are worth reading, and he seemed like a warm and friendly person when I've met him at conferences.
With all these positive attributes, why does this book deserve three stars? I disagree with Owens critical emphasis; his argument has been influential. He claims that "identity" is the central theme of Native writing. He argues that all Native writers must come to terms with their own mixedblood identity, and with consequent marginalization in two worlds. There is no question that identity is an important issue, but it is far from the central one. For many Native writers it is insignificant. For some, it is central. For others, it is an issue subordinated under other more significant issues. Identity is part of a complex of issues (land, resources, spirituality, images, and stereotypes) that are ultimately concerned with issues of self-control by individuals and communities. For tribal peoples in the United States the central issue, if there is one, is sovereignty.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I found Louis Owens' book after I wrote Inherit the Tide. Funny I didn't think to look for something like this before. Maybe it was because Inherit The Tide poured forth so spontaneously. With hindsight I would say Owens is right on the mark, alarmingly so. His overarching theme of revealing the main thread of Native American novels as one of self awareness and self identity nails the issue. His familiarity with works of great Native American works and writers links his presentation of examples straight to the reader.

I would describe the author as a scholar. I reached this conclusion bsed on the content of "Destiny", not a biography. It is well done, perhaps a bit stilted but this takes it into more believeable territory. It is an admirable work. Good Job.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?