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Other Losses: An Investigation into the Mass Deaths of German Prisoners at the Hands of the French and Americans after World War II Paperback – September 20, 2011


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Other Losses: An Investigation into the Mass Deaths of German Prisoners at the Hands of the French and Americans after World War II + Crimes and Mercies: The Fate of German Civilians Under Allied Occupation, 1944–1950 + After the Reich: The Brutal History of the Allied Occupation
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 392 pages
  • Publisher: Talonbooks; 3 edition (September 20, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0889226652
  • ISBN-13: 978-0889226654
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #821,406 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

James Bacque
James Bacque is a novelist, book editor, essayist and historian whose work has helped raise awareness in human rights issues associated with war crimes, particularly spurring debate on and research into the treatment of German POWs at the end of World War II.

His fiction titles include The Lonely Ones, 1969 (Big Lonely in the paperback edition, 1970); A Man of Talent, 1972; Creation (with Robert Kroetsch and Pierre Gravel), 1972; The Queen Comes to Minnicog, 1979; and Our Fathers’ War, 2006. His history titles include Crimes and Mercies, an immediate bestseller upon release, and Other Losses.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

98 of 108 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
James Bacque deals with a topic most historians (especially Eisenhower apologists like Stephen Ambrose) want to avoid. It is the frightening account of how Allied forces, at the end of World War II, systematically used, abused and starved millions of German POWs in what Gen. George Patton described as "Gestapo tactics." As an historian, Army veteran, and grandson of a German army officer during that war, it's high time this story was told. So much is written about German atrocities during the war (Malmedy, Trois Ponts, etc). But little is discussed about such issues as this (another being "Operation Keelhaul"... forced 'repatriation' of Russians who served in the German Army). Bacque's evidence is convincing, thorough, and hard to avoid. Too bad so-called "historians" like Ambrose can't see this for himself. Must reading for any serious student of World War II history.
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69 of 80 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 14, 1997
Format: Hardcover
This subject is hardly ever written about. It is time that the truth came out. My father was one of the German POWs sent to France, he was relased in 1948. This book covers much of what he told me, but what he told me was worse. Unfortunately, he died between the time the first reviews came out and the time that I was able to procure the book from Canada
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful By John Wear on December 13, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
James Bacque does an excellent job of documenting his claim that the Allies, led by the United States of America, intentionally starved to death approximately one million German prisoners of war. Not only does Bacque quote from German survivors of the camps, but he quotes a large number of American guards and officers who witnessed the German POW deaths. These Americans include Martin Brech, Daniel McConnell, Major-General Richard Steinbach, Lieutenant Colonel Henry W. Allard, Colonel Philip Lauben, Colonels James B. Mason and Charles H. Beasley, Captain Ben H. Jackson, General Mark Clark, Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Pollack, Sergeant Merrill W. Campbell, Captain Frederick Siegfriedt, Lieutenant Arthur W. von Fange, and a couple of American officers who asked to remain anonymous for fear of reprisals.

The Red Cross was prevented from providing food and shelter to the German POWs even though these were readily available. The German POWs were not provided tents or housing, and many died from exposure to the elements. Most of the German POWs were intentionally given inadequate food, and many died from slow starvation. Since Eisenhower and his associates at SHAEF controlled the media, pictures and stories from these camps were not allowed to reach the media. Eisenhower showed the piles of dead bodies at Buchenwald, Bergen-Belsen and other German camps at the end of the war, but the pictures of dead bodies at the American-run German POW camps were not allowed to reach the public.

James Bacque ends his outstanding book with an appeal for tolerance and understanding. Bacque states: "Surely it is time for the guesswork and the lying to stop. Surely it is time to take seriously what the eye-witnesses on both sides are trying to tell us about our history. All over the Western world, savage atrocities against the Armenians, the Ukrainians and the Jews are known. Only the atrocities against the Germans are denied. Are Germans not people in our eyes?"
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lewis Gates on June 7, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I was not surprise to find that the reviews for this book are polarized to extremes. The dark secrets of Allied war crimes are slowly being unraveled. The crimes against humanity committed during WWII by the Allies are very unsettling as is the stain of slavery on the western world - but however uncomfortable it may be, this sordid piece of history needs to be brought to light. The fire bombing of Dresden, the fire bombing of Japanese women and children, the American Japanese concentration camps, as well as the American Germans and American Italians that were placed in concentration camps like Crystal City (1 out of the 23 continental US camps), the atom bomb which very well may have been dropped weeks after the Japanese had been putting out feelers for surrender, the diplomatic blunders of the Allies that cost the lives of millions (Churchill, Hitler, and the Unnecessary War by Patrick J. Buchanan), Henry Morgenthau's scorched earth policy, the plundering and looting of Germany by enlisted men and officers alike, and Eisenhower's cold blooded murdered of POWs are just the examples that come to mind.

The scales of justice are not even and the playing field is not yet level. War crimes are for losers, not winners. Human nature is the same for the victory and vanquished alike. The "winners" are not exempt from the mammalian instinct whereby men and children are killed, women are raped, and goods are plundered - nor are Americans somehow unaffiliated by the savage barbarity that emerges in man at various and predictable intervals - such as war. If you want to find truth in history, you'll have to dig, because the "winners" write it. Except for the Peloponnesian Wars, I don't know of any case in history that deviates from this norm.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Tom Marking on March 14, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In the waning days of World War II in Europe millions of Wehrmacht soldiers were fleeing westward in order to surrender to the Americans and British whom they assumed would give them better treatment than the vindictive Russians closing in from the east. Little did they know that they were walking into a trap that would seal the fate of many of them. In this excellently documented and reasoned book Canadian historian James Bacque takes a look at those fateful days and the inevitable tragedy that resulted in the needless deaths of upwards of one million German prisoners. He takes us behind the scenes to the planning and policy making occurring in the American high command and demonstrates convincingly that what happened was no fluke, but rather deliberate mass murder. If Bacque is right, and I believe he is, then this is the single greatest war crime committed by American soldiers in American history. And they almost got away with it too. For more than forty years this war crime sat hidden in U.S. Army records obscured by bureaucratic euphemisms such as Other Losses which forms the title of this book. Even today the Pentagon is still covering up the facts by claiming that Other Losses means transfers of prisoners to other commands. And some of the world's most renowned World War II historians such as Stephen Ambrose have participated in this cover-up.

Bacque takes us into the prison camps themselves using eyewitness testimony by some of the German prisoners who survived their ordeal and also eyewitness testimony by their American camp guards. Germans were herded by the thousands into open pens surrounded by barbed wire and prison towers. Only a few tents were provided. Most prisoners sat on the ground which turned to mud when the rains of spring came to Germany.
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