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Other Losses Paperback – July 8, 2008


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Paperback, July 8, 2008
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 306 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; 2 Revised edition (July 8, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1551681919
  • ISBN-13: 978-1551681917
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,450,430 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

James Bacque
James Bacque is a novelist, book editor, essayist and historian whose work has helped raise awareness in human rights issues associated with war crimes, particularly spurring debate on and research into the treatment of German POWs at the end of World War II.

His fiction titles include The Lonely Ones, 1969 (Big Lonely in the paperback edition, 1970); A Man of Talent, 1972; Creation (with Robert Kroetsch and Pierre Gravel), 1972; The Queen Comes to Minnicog, 1979; and Our Fathers’ War, 2006. His history titles include Crimes and Mercies, an immediate bestseller upon release, and Other Losses.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

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172 of 191 people found the following review helpful By E. Rodin MD on July 4, 2001
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Mr. Bacque is to be congratulated for publishing this book which describes the fate German soldiers who had surrendered to General Eisenhower's forces at the end of WWII. They had expected to be treated according to the Geneva convention governing the conduct of armies in regard to captured enemy personnel. This was not to be the case. As Mr. Bacque points out an entire new category of "Disarmed Enemy Forces", DEF, was created. Its only purpose was to avoid having to feed and house these millions of ex-soldiers and thereby bypass the Geneva convention to which America was a signatory. One may argue about the precise numbers of ex-soldiers who died in these "temporary enclosures" but the fact that inhuman treatment did exist cannot be denied. Neither can the fact that a considerable percentage of them was subsequently given to the French for what is called today "slave labor," albeit this term refers nowadays only to non-German nationals. Readers who may feel negatively about Bacque's revelations should be aware that this treatment of former members of the German army was not just happenstance but the execution of the Morgenthau plan to render Germany harmless forever. The plan was not directed against the German leadership or Nazis, but the German people at large. Mr. Baque makes frequent reference to this unfortunate document but readers, who cannot conceive that U.S. personnel may also carry out atrocities should look at the Document section of Warren F. Kimball's "Swords or Ploughshares? The Morgenthau plan for Defeated Nazi Germany."The book clearly shows that Roosevelt had endorsed a policy of "being hard on Germany" and Eisenhower was in full accord.Read more ›
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97 of 109 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 1, 2000
My uncle served in the US Army during WW2. When I was younger, he had told me about the US prison camps that he had seen as a member of an Army Engineering detachment. His stories are, sadly, supported by the book, "Other Losses".
Unfortunately, my uncle is now dead, or else, he could give everyone reading this review an eye witness account of the American attrocities perpetrated on the German people after the war had ended. As he had said, "We were supposed to be the Good Guys!"
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59 of 70 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 14, 2000
Americans like to justify themselves by believing in the Hollywood notion that they can simply do no wrong. That is, of course, a self-deception. James Bacque has given a well-documented and superbly supported reason for Americans to ask themselves if they truly know what their military and government did in the so-called "Good War." If you are interested in learning some disturbing facts about the U.S. Army of Occupation in Germany, by all means read "Other Losses."
And as for the flak put up by the Establishment's court historians, most notably Stephen Ambrose, consider the words of Dr. Ernest F. Fisher, Jr., former historian at the Center of Military History United States Army, in the book's foreword: "Eisenhower's hatred, passed through the lens of a compliant military bureaucracy, produced the horror of death camps unequaled by anything in American military history. In the face of the catastrophic consequences of this hatred, the casual indifference expressed by the SHAEF officers is the most painful aspect of the U.S. Army's involvement." These words, obviously an expression of regret and not accusation, from a career U.S. Army officer carry far more weight than the pseudo-indignant cries of "Foul!" from an academic at LSU with an agenda to pursue.
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54 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Dana Gourley on January 6, 2000
James Bacque's "Other Losses" is an authoritative account of the awful conditions in which the Americans and French kept their former prisoners of war after world war II. The book is well researched and footnoted and provides much in the way of new information. The author convincingly argues that shocking crimes were comitted. The author comes to the very controversial conclusion that Eisenhower willfuly maltreated the former POWs after WWII resulting in mass deaths. It is shocking that there is so little evidence one way or the other about such a recent event. However James Bacque presents the data available for anyone to form their own conclusions.
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43 of 51 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 22, 2000
I have read the book,and had a very hard time to see because I was crying at all times. Not way or how it was written, no, because I have been placed back from where the story came from. RHEINBERG.......1945..March-April May.In the midst of June we where pulled out and transfered to France. I visited the place,what is now a cemetary and called...Kriegs Gefangenen Lager Rheinberg.We......,the ones being there,do not want to be remembered....ever........!!!! ( Every word in this book is true)
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35 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Spk Rhein-nahe on January 9, 2006
The Book "Other Losses" tells the same story my father told. He was an ambulance driver in the war. After WW2 was over and his unit found out, the entire unit surrendered to the Americans who in turn sold(!) him and all others of his unit to the Russians for slave-labor in siberian coal mines. He managed to escape in 1951, but almost all others of his unit died of hunger and lack of food and medical help. He never recovered physically or mentally. My Father-in-Law survived an American POW-Camp, being just a pen in the open field with barbed wire and guards around it. No buildings, no food no nothing! He also told of the prisoners were just left to die.
A very good book.
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