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No Other Name?: A Critical Survey of Christian Attitudes Toward the World Religions (American Society of Missiology) Paperback – February 1, 1985


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Product Details

  • Series: American Society of Missiology (Book 7)
  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Orbis Books (February 1, 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0883443473
  • ISBN-13: 978-0883443477
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #406,214 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul Knitter Served as a Divine Word missionary before assuming a position at Xavier University, Cincinnati, where he is presently Professor of Theology. For the past fifteen years his main interest has been Christian with other religions, especially those of the East. His previous publications include Towards a Protestant Theology of Religions.

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Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Wes Howard-Brook on May 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
As a practicing Christian and Bible teacher and writer, I add my review to note how the "one star" reviews below indicate how needed Knitter's book is. The other reviewers' "answer" to the question is a flat: "no dialogue: Christianity must win!" There is no place for this kind of triumphalism in a world rife with inter-religious violence.

Knitter is an excellent writer and deeply believing Christian. If his book is flawed (and it is, with the benefit of 20 years of hindsight), it is partly because the conversation had been repressed for so long. His proposal is modest and one which Jesus would surely have admired as an attempt to find the common quest for God in many different people.

The one thing I agree with the other reviewers on is Knitter's attempt to relativize the Resurrection. As Paul says so clearly (and witnessed to so strongly in his life), if Jesus isn't truly risen, there is no reason to risk one's life as a Christian. But that truth certainly doesn't exclude the possibility of the one God being revealed by other means in other times and places.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 9, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
No Other Name? A Critical Survey of Christian Attitudes toward the World Religions is a case for religious pluralism. The basic premise of his book is that "a nonnormative, theocentric Christology does not contradict the New Testament proclamation of Jesus and therefore is a valid interpretation of that proclamation" (172). Knitter's argument is structured around popular attitudes that exist on the spectrum of pluralistic dialogue as well as varying degrees of acceptance of pluralism by Christians. His ultimate statement requires a redefinition of Jesus' particularity, so his final chapters are devoted to how pluralists of different backgrounds have devoted themselves to engaging an interreligious dialogue. Flowing from his thesis, Knitter's most stinging proposal is that Christianity should be redefined in order to enter the pluralistic dialogue to which the religious world is evolving.
Knitter cites Ernst Troeltsch as the father of historical relativism. According to Troeltsch, no religion has any advantage over another. In fact, all religions are cultural expositions and expressions of utility. Christianity may be the best for the West, Troeltsch would argue, but the evolution of religious understanding moved the world religions from a classicist to a historical culture. This, therefore, creates a problem with concepts like incarnation and superiority.
He references Arnold Toynbee's belief "that all religions are basically the same"(49). He sees a common essence in all religions, so he encourages a discarding of anything considered nonessential. This being a subjective call, he prefers an "esoteric faith" (49) to the uniqueness of traditional Christianity.
Knitter calls upon Carl Jung to support his religious common source theory.
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By Jean Collins on October 16, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is one of the most influential and inspiring books I have ever read. It helped me to develop a deeper understanding of my Christian faith, and in my view, is one of the most important books of our time. Without it, I would not be a committed Christian today.
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