Other People's Lives

June 16, 2009 | Format: MP3

$4.99
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4:36
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3:52
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4:10
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3:43
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11:14


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 2, 2008
  • Release Date: June 2, 2008
  • Label: V2
  • Copyright: (C) 2006 Ray Davies Entertainments Ltd under exclusive licence to Universal Music TV, a division of Universal Music Operations Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:01:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002DOG6J0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (93 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #128,889 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

I will keep listening to this one for a long time to come.
Russ Bellinger
The lyrics as always are very good, and the music is played extremely well and is very tight.
Steve Langford
This album must clealy be one of the best releases of this year.
Poul Hoejvang

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Wayne Klein HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 26, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Ray Davies has been MIA for too long."Other People's Lives" is a terrific return to form. The glossy production surface compliments the songs-- here he does what he does best creating character studies in each song perfectly crafted with rich melodies. From the touch of sonic discord (pardon the pun) that opens "Things are Gonna Change" to the witty lyrics and a melody that would have fit at home on "Village Green" in "Is There Life After Breakfast?" Ray's in top form. The playing perfectly supports his witty observations in "Stand Up Comic" which acts as a perfect metaphor for his own career.

The CD booklet has great liner notes from Ray discussing the origin of the songs, how they came to be recorded, what he thinks of them now that they're finished. As usual the notes are clever, witty and feature his brand of self depreciating humor that fans love. While the material was written and recorded prior to his attack in New Orleans (he chasd a purse snatcher that had his girlfriend's stuff and was injured in a knife attack in the process) and Hurricane Katrina they sound like they capture that vibe.

His last album 1998's "The Storyteller" CD had some new material that was extremely good mixed in with vintage Kinks tunes as part of Ray's "audiobiography" tour for X-RAY. These songs were recorded in 2002 but weren't mixed until last year with finishing touches put on the album as well. At age 62 Ray has found his muse and that's good for us the listeners. Sure some people complain that Dave's biting guitar playing is missed (and it is on a few tracks)but it would also have felt out of place on some of these more intimate tracks. Besides, Dave's been busy making some fine music of his own with "Bug" and was recovering from his stroke last year.

Ray we missed you! Don't wait another 7 years to release the next album!
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By ralph on February 21, 2006
Format: Audio CD
A long wait for this one. Mr. Davies first proper solo disc! It's all I expected (and more) from Ray Davies. 13 minor masterpieces, and nothing drags this disc down! It's been a long

long time we've heard anything new from Ray (with or without the Kinks). Savor this one! A very solid 5 star CD!!!
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Morten Vindberg on November 10, 2007
Format: Audio CD
"Working Man's Café" is Ray Davies' second solo-release in two years; but it actually could be called his first real solo album. "Return to Waterloo" from 1985 was a soundtrack-album, "Storyteller" was mainly a live-recording and last year's "Other People's Lives" was recorded over a 3-4 years period.

It been more than ten years since Ray last recorded with brother Dave as the Kinks, so maybe it's irrelevant to compare his present music with his legendary band. But as his vocals and songs were such a big part of the band's profile, it's really hard not to do so; especially as his new album has so many ingredients that were also typical of the Kinks.

The raw unpolished sound that characterised the Kinks' early recordings for Pye is more or less reinvented on this new album; and this without losing Ray's unique melodic touch. Actually this new album features most virtues of the best Kinks albums. Great songs, lots of energy, great vocals and a lot of variation - without losing consistency.

"Other People's Lives" was not a bad album at all, but it did not really work as well as an album as this new release. Several songs deserve to be brought forward, and a good handful of them are already among my Davies favourites.

There some very beautiful ballads; several with moving melancholy lyrics. The closing track "Real World" is a great song in the vein of "Don't Forget to Dance". "Imaginary Man" is another ballad - just as strong. "One More Time" is a great midtempo song, very much sounding like the Kinks of the late 70's.

More bluesy is "Working Man's Café" and "Morphine Song" has some female harmony vocals that make you think of "Preservation Act" - both fine tracks.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By K. C. Haugh on May 18, 2006
Format: Audio CD
For an all too-long stretch in the last two decades, the Kinks fought an uphill battle to stay relevant. There's no questioning the impact Ray Davies and his bandmates have had on popular music, but it's difficult to avoid the nostalgia act label. To my ears, Ray and the Kinks put out some great music well after their heyday, most notably with several enduring classics: "Destroyer", "Do it Again", "Come Dancing", etc., etc. Later albums like Think Visual and UK Jive made it a challenge to find diamonds in the rough, but to Ray's credit, they plugged away.

I came into listening to this album as a devout fan, having seen Ray's Storyteller tour a couple times, and loving it. I always felt though, that the new songs were good, but paled in performance next to "Lola", "Waterloo Sunset", and even "Dead End Street." Tough acts to follow, those Kinks klassics. So with a little trepidation, I heard a few songs from "Other People's Lives" on an NPR interview with Ray, and was very pleasantly surprised.

Fast forward a few weeks, and I received this album as a gift. The first time I played it, I was distracted with other things, had it on in the background, and wasn't blown away. The next playing, I was more attentive to the album, and I gotta say--this is damn near perfect. It seems more like some of Lyle Lovett's best work than it does a Kinks album, and I mean that as the highest compliment. You can always count on Ray for clever lyrics, and on Other People's Lives, they're almost always accompanied with infectious melody. A great example is "All She Wrote"--the lyrics and phrasing fit the song well, and are punctuated with a few rockin' flares here and there. If this song is performed live, with an arrangement anywhere close to the album, I'll even take it over Lola.
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