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Our Lady of Guadalupe: And the Conquest of Darkness Paperback – October 1, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 119 pages
  • Publisher: Christendom Press; 1 edition (October 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0931888123
  • ISBN-13: 978-0931888120
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #344,922 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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A truly, must-read book.
A. Cramer
The majority of the book actually is an historical account of Aztec Mexico, Cortes' conquest, etc.
Steven H. Propp
Naturally he had circumstantial Divine help and great courage.
Dana Maanum

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Constance M. Irwin on April 28, 2001
This book represents a refreshing departure from the polically correct historical revisionism that passes for history, especially regarding the Age of Discovery and the conquest of the Americas. Since the 60's we've been inundated with an alternative historical view that enobles the native peoples of America at the expense of their humanity, which likewise demonizes anything or anyone of European origin.
This book does not tip toe around the fact that the Aztecs practiced human sacrifice on a massive scale to the tune of 50,000 victims per year; and that the Aztecs conducted wars against their neighbors aggressively, for the sole purpose of of obtaining sacrificial victims to their God. Unlike many histories of that era and place, Dr. Carroll does not waste space attempting to 'get inside the minds' of the Aztec hierarchy. His purpose is not to be an apolgist for Montezuma et. al., but to relate the facts. Nor does he let the conquistadors off the hook. We hear in excruciating detail of the cruel and brutal treatment accorded the natives by the likes of the four commissioners appointed by king Charles to govern Mexico. Dr. Carol, likewise faults the Spanish for not allowing the natives to study for the priesthood and for oppressive policies kept the natives poor.
He doles out praise and blame to individuals, both native and Spanish without prejudice and with a committment to the truth. He states unabashedly that his loyalty is to the Christian world view.
If I could give this book 10 stars, I would!!
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36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Dana Maanum on March 19, 2002
The riveting history of a great man, Hernan Cortes, who with 300 men conquered the demonic empire of 14 million Aztecs who had ritualistic human sacrifices of ripping out live human hearts on top of their pyramid in Mexico City. Naturally he had circumstantial Divine help and great courage. What man destroys his own means of escape (he sank his vessels) and turns to face odds of 46,000 to 1? Then a few years later the miraculous appearance of Our Lady and huge conversions. Some were still carrying on human sacrifices in secret til Our Lady came. Greatest book I've found in years, excellent for young men to read about heroism and faith. Some ladies may be turned off by the barbaric cruelty and cannibalism of the Aztecs, but it gives great perspective as to the evil that had to be conquered. It is also one of my wife's favorite books and we have gone through 4 as I continue to give it to others.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Matt Beaven on July 12, 2003
War, Human Sacrafice, Courage, and A Fight Against All Odds! This books brings to life the struggle against the evil one in Aztec Mexico with the arrival of the Spanish, just after having defeated the Muslims forces in Europe, under the mission of Mary, Mother of God, to bring Christ to millions onto millions. At the same time so many rebelled against the Church of Christ's founding in Europe, so many found it as their salvation against brutal death in the name of pure evil -- the actions of the Spanish guiding the natives to Christ through Mary. And through her, Juan Diago was able to bring full sight in this amazing story and truly conquer evil in a spiritual war (following the actual war) with the victory in baptism of millions. If I could recommend any book to my friends, this would be one of the first!
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33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By otro lector mas on April 4, 2006
I am a practising Catholic, and Carroll's partiality suits me just fine. But even if you disagree with Carroll's viewpoint you still have to respect the information in this book.

Having said that, I have never been keen in seeing the hand of Satan on every bad thing done by humanity. But after reading this book I have made a big exception: there can be no question now that the Aztecs did indeed worship the devil, whether the PC crowd likes it or not. Never before had I read such a clear exposition of the inherently evil organization of the Aztec Empire and its' association with devil-worship. I now find truly revolting to think of having read PC apologists chastising the Spaniards for not "respecting" the Aztecs' "legitimate" religious beliefs. Indeed, it would have been unforgivable for the Spaniards, or whoever had the means, not to put an end to the savagery of the Aztecs.

One must also give weight to Carroll's apology of Cortes' and his Conquistadors. Native allies outnumbered Spaniards at least 50 to 1 when they stormed Tenochtitlan (I loved his observation that Cortes' detractors claim the Spaniards' victory would have been impossible without European-borne diseases which ravaged the Aztecs, yet somehow those diseases spared the Native allies). By simple mathematical probability, therefore, most atrocities would have been committed at the hands of the natives (who clearly were looking for payback), and Spaniards would have been too few to stop them if they had tried. The wholesale conscription of Indians to work for Spaniards occured when Cortes was away chasing Cristobal De Olid, and when Cortes returned he was stripped of his authority. The author also dispels many myths regarding the Spaniards' obsession for gold as their sole motivation for the conquest.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Quilmiense on February 2, 2007
Verified Purchase
It is time that our young folk at college start getting the facts right, if not at college then thru the original sources. This book is a compedium of wisdom. It is a summary of the Conquest (physical & spiritual) of Mexico by the Christian kingdom of Spain. Whether you like it or not not is not the point... they are FACTS! History is not to be liked or disliked, it's past and there's nothing to do about it. Those who consider the Christianization of the Aztecs (along with their subjugation to a new people) wrong, they ought to tell me what they would have done if they were among the Spaniards of those times! You cannot tell because, in the first place: you don't know enough history to blame or defend anybody; and second: it's impossible to put ourselves in the position of folks 500 years ago while living in the sedative & government-subsidized world of today (unless you're a hypocrite to dare).

I am only half thry this little book, a little more than a 100 pages. How can this excellent historian condense all the adventures and facts of this history in so few pages is something that I haven't seen before. The result is that not only every page, but every line and every word is pecisely chosen and situated. I am savoring every page of it, going back and re-reading to fully grasp the implication of the scenes described.

Mr. Warren H. Carroll's catholicism doesn't diminish the accuracy or objectivity of this account; we are talking History, not politics or religion, and Mr Carroll is a historian of top-notch quality. He uses Aztec as well as Spanish sources that, either were themselves witnesses or recuperate testimonies from witnesses.
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