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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An interesting take on the familiar
Cogently argued, thoughtfully presented, entertainingly written. Since purchasing this book when it was first published, I've reread parts of it many times, just for the enjoyable and lively style of argument. Sure, there are many points I disagree with (but I could say the same for Neitzsche and Wittgenstein, too), but I always put the book down impressed by Auerbach's...
Published on February 27, 2002

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16 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Why Do Cultural Ctitics Have To Write Like This?
OK--I know that Nina Auerbach is a famous, groundbreaking feminist literary critic. I don't disagree with many of her points in this book. (Though I'm innately suspicious of any system that fits as perfectly as hers does. She never seems to find an example that doesn't fit her thesis--rather like an undergraduate writing a paper and discarding any evidence that doesn't...
Published on September 21, 2005 by Christopher Weaver


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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An interesting take on the familiar, February 27, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Our Vampires, Ourselves (Paperback)
Cogently argued, thoughtfully presented, entertainingly written. Since purchasing this book when it was first published, I've reread parts of it many times, just for the enjoyable and lively style of argument. Sure, there are many points I disagree with (but I could say the same for Neitzsche and Wittgenstein, too), but I always put the book down impressed by Auerbach's style and imagination. Others may claim that the book warrant only a single star in terms of a rating, for no other reason than their disagreement with the thesis. I say, whether you wind up agreeing or disagreeing--buying into everything Auerbach says or writing her off as wrongheaded--this book gives you plenty to chew on. If you disagree, ask yourself why you disagree; you may end up embracing the viewpoint of the third mind.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars jenny wright likes 'Our Vampires, Our Selves', March 1, 2013
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being that i portrayed a character that is written about in the book...Mae from the 80's movie Near Dark
i found the whole book to be fascinating and well written. I am honored to be on the cover...from the feeding scene.
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16 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Why Do Cultural Ctitics Have To Write Like This?, September 21, 2005
This review is from: Our Vampires, Ourselves (Paperback)
OK--I know that Nina Auerbach is a famous, groundbreaking feminist literary critic. I don't disagree with many of her points in this book. (Though I'm innately suspicious of any system that fits as perfectly as hers does. She never seems to find an example that doesn't fit her thesis--rather like an undergraduate writing a paper and discarding any evidence that doesn't fit.) And I am interested in cultual criticism--particularly the idea that horror fiction reflects the fears, desires, and fixations of particular time periods. This said, I found Auerbach's book tough slogging. Why do cultural critics seem to feel that the "lower" the text they're criticizing, the more jargon-filled, pedantic, and convulted their prose style must become? The endlessly long sentences with their multpile references and their twisting, parenthetical asides made my eyes glaze over. Certainly Auerbach is not the worst prose stylist of any academic I've read, but this fact, itself, is an indictment of the kind of writing that gets university professors published these days.

So, yes, there are insights and arguments in this book that make it worth reading. But I found the experience of reading the book a rather depressing enterprise, and it made me long for clearer, livlier, and more accessible writing from theorists and literary critics. I can't say that I'm optimistic on this count.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Interesting Take, March 7, 2009
This review is from: Our Vampires, Ourselves (Paperback)
For those who aren't interested in a Lit Crit approach: Don't bother to read it, then complain that it's focused on Literary Criticism! If you bother to know what you're getting into however, and want to approach it not as a collection of horror stories but as a provocative take on what these "little stories" mean when applied to the broader cultural perspective, then I definitely recommend it. This is a well-written book by a very intelligent and engaging author.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nina Auerbach, November 25, 2011
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This review is from: Our Vampires, Ourselves (Paperback)
Nina Auerbach: A great scholar, interesting book and well researched in a topic that is fashionable today. As contemporary as when she wrote it in 1995.Our Vampires, Ourselves
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Friendly vampires??, February 14, 2010
This review is from: Our Vampires, Ourselves (Paperback)
I don't totally buy the argument, but it's a novel take on the subject. Definitely worth a read if you want to find out about the "softer side" of the undead!
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book for School, October 24, 2009
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I received the book in better condition than was described by the author. It shipped sooner than expected as well.
I purchased this book as a resource for an academic paper for one of my graduate classes. The information was very interesting and useful. I believe this particular seller to be honest and trustworthy and would buy other products without worry.
This book is a resource for academic study and it is also an interesting read for personal use.
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31 of 79 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Paranoia and Loathing, January 19, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Our Vampires, Ourselves (Paperback)
Auerbach got one thing right. Vampires are a reflection of the times. Nina as a literary critic has a wonderful sense of lower criticism, in fact, I say she's been bitten by the redaction bug. She longs for a day when the genre will be released from its patriarchal chains and be allowed to act freely as an expression of homosexual love. I personally don't care what your sexual preferences are, I do care that people shouldn't try to change the past, re-write it so to speak, and call it history. The past is static. The present is another story.
I have a question for the more feminist-minded among us. If we get rid of our patriarchal shackles and allow the female--especially the lesbian--vampire to do what she wills with her victims, how does that mitigate against the fact that it is still the female who is seduced (aren't ladies more than helpless masses of hormones?), and destroyed? Meet the new (female) despot, same as the old (male) despot. This is progress? This is something to be proud of? The closest thing to women being on equal terms with men in vampire lore today is Buffy.
Auerbach basically restricted her discussion of vampire lore to the western--read British and American--traditions. There are other traditions, especially Greek and Russian, who represent vampires in a more three dimensional perspective. These monsters are much more than adrenaline and hormones, and would better dignify the embattled in our society, male and female.
Now don't get me wrong. There is nothing wrong with adrenaline and hormones. But if we are reduced to them, then there isn't really that much to us. We might as well embrace ghosts as the accurate representation of who and what we are in society.
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Our Vampires, Ourselves
Our Vampires, Ourselves by Nina Auerbach (Paperback - April 7, 1997)
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