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Out & About Campus: Personal Accounts by Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender College Students Paperback – April 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Alyson Books (April 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1555834809
  • ISBN-13: 978-1555834807
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #155,030 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Many of the stories in Out & About Campus are as upsetting or enraging as one would imagine, given the scenario of a queer or questioning youth thrust into a historically straight institution and surrounded by other equally insecure young people. Tales of intolerant classmates and obstructive professors abound, with the usual threats of violence, gay bashings, and episodes of self-loathing. But the gradual movement toward acceptance of "diversity" on college campuses since the mid-1980s has clearly altered the social landscape. In "Sisterhood," for instance, Stephanie J. Stillman recounts her gradual coming-out to her sorority sisters, most of whom had figured it out for themselves and none of whom condemned her as she had expected. In "Competitive College," Ruth Wielgosz explains the informal designation of "Big Dyke on Campus" at Bryn Mawr and describes the requirements for the position (as listed in the college newspaper), which begin with "(1) Has lots of attitude, very self-confident," then move on to "(5) Unattainable, or nearly so, (6) Many people have crushes on her, and many more feel too unworthy, and (7) Visually impressive, especially with regard to hair." Several contributors describe their political activism on campus and their service work for other gay students. Overall, these stories provide an encouraging look at an unprecedented cultural expansion. --Regina Marler

From Library Journal

Howard and Stevens, a masters of education candidate and the director of residential life, respectively, at the University of Vermont, have collected 28 first-person accounts from lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered students from colleges and universities across the country. A good mix of ethnicity and college settings marks these essays, which are all tied together by the theme of coming out to oneself and to the community. Some essays are heartbreaking and others triumphant; all are engagingly written. There are stories of supportive friends and family but also of ostracism and gay bashing. Several students struggle with religion, another successfully comes out in a sorority, and another describes the challenges of being a transsexual in transition. Though their struggles vary, all of the students seem to have gained self-confidence during their college years. Recommended for all public and academic libraries but especially for colleges and universities where students facing similar challenges might find some comfort and inspiration.
-Debra Moore, Loyola Marymount Univ. Lib., Los Angeles
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Nicole on April 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
As a straight college-age female, I was worried that I might not be able to identify and relate to the experiences of the writers. As I read, however, the authors made me realize that their stories are simply an account of their struggle to do what they feel is right--a process to which anyone can relate. I especially enjoyed the piece by the student from the University of Texas, Andrew Gray. His courage and determination are truly remarkable. Yay Andrew!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
The voices of the students come through eloquently in this engaging and fascinating book. The diversity of the GLBT experience on campus is evident. The book helps provide insight into the various experiences of GLBT students and helps readers see the experience as not at all monolithic. I recommend this excellent book.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Travis on December 4, 2002
Format: Paperback
Coming out of the closet is one of those things that makes one feel out in the open and sticking out like a sore thumb. You contemplate that you might be gay or bi, then finally realize that you are and come out of the closet. Right away, especially if you're anything like me, that's exactly what goes on. Surely, right off the bat, one will feel that they can't talk on the same level let alone relate to anyone. Out of curiosity, I bought this book, and read a bunch of the stories. Although not all of them are just about coming out of the closet, I could relate to a lot of the stories, and probably anyone that has ever come out and goes or has gone to college can relate to at least one of them. All in all, however, in order to get the most out of college, and an open minded perspective, I strongly recommend this collection to anyone just graduating high school and bound for college. Or, don't, and end up with everyone hating you, for you haven't outgrown the high school labeling mentality of calling every gay man a faggot.
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