Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerrilla and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$20.93
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $7.02 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $6.10
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerrilla Hardcover – October 1, 2013


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$20.93
$15.90 $17.21


Frequently Bought Together

Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerrilla + The Accidental Guerrilla: Fighting Small Wars in the Midst of a Big One + Counterinsurgency
Price for all three: $43.95

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (October 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199737509
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199737505
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (72 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #30,927 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

A Look Inside: Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerrilla [Click Images to Enlarge]

MRAP
A mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle (MRAP), a few minutes before the ambush in Dara-i Nur District, Afghanistan, September 10, 2009. Photo by David Kilcullen.

Feral City
Feral City-- African Union peacekeepers drive past shops and power lines on the streets of Mogadishu, June 2012. Photo by David Kilcullen.

Mogadishu
Competitive control-- Somali clan militia at a checkpoint on the outskirts of Mogadishu, June 2012. Photo by David Kilcullen.

Untitled
Competitive control-- a Somali building destroyed by militants as punishment for its owners’ failure to pay insurgent taxes. Photo taken by David Kilcullen.
Hindu Kush
Hindu Kush, Afghanistan-- the remote landlocked mountain environment has become the default for many western militaries, diplomats, and development agencies since 2001. Photo taken by David Kilcullen.
Tank Versus Bikers
Competitive control-- African Union troops with weapons, radios, and ammunition captured from al-Shabaab during the battle of Afgoye, June 2012. Photo taken by David Kilcullen.

Review


"An iconoclastic new book on future urban conflicts." --David Ignatius, Washington Post


"Out of the Mountains isn't brimming with tactical solutions to such problems. Just as present-day counterinsurgency doctrine didn't materialize overnight, the answers to the questions Mr. Kilcullen poses will evolve over time. But his insistence that it is 'time to drag ourselves -- body and mind -- out of the mountains' serves as a reminder that complacency remains one of the most serious threats to U.S. national security." --Wall Street Journal


"Kilcullen has a rare ability to combine serious theory with the insight of an experienced practitioner." --Foreign Affairs


"Out of the Mountains will appeal to a broad range of readers -- social scientists, security experts and military officers, urban planners and technologists, and a general readership interested in how today's global trends will shape tomorrow's world. Readers who enjoy the work of Robert Kaplan or even Paul Theroux -- the engaging mix of adventure writing with sophisticated social and political analysis -- will find Kilcullen quite appealing." --Washington Monthly


"Although an enemy of the state, I must concede that this is a brilliant book by the most unfettered and analytically acute mind in the military intelligentsia. Kilcullen unflinchingly confronts the nightmare of endless warfare in the slums of the world." --Mike Davis, author of Planet of Slums


"David Kilcullen brilliantly illuminates a coming dystopian urban world, part Blade Runner and part Minority Report. He cogently argues that we must rapidly find a way to build our own security networks to prepare for the coming age of urban guerrillas. Out of the Mountains crystallizes this sadly probable future in vivid and practical terms." --Admiral James Stavridis, USN (Ret), Former Supreme Allied Commander at NATO and Dean, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University


"Kilcullen delivers a lucid, important study that American leaders should read." --Kirkus Reviews



More About the Author

David Kilcullen is the award-winning author of Accidental Guerrilla (2009) and Counterinsurgency (2010) and now Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerrilla (2013).

His newest book takes us away from the remote, rural guerrilla warfare of Afghanistan, and into the marginalized slums and complex security threats of the world's coastal cities. Scrutinizing major environmental trends -- population growth, coastal urbanization, and increasing digital connectivity-- he projects a future of feral cities, urban systems under stress, and increasing overlaps between crime and war, internal and external threats, and the real and virtual worlds.

Dave is the Chief Executive Officer of Caerus Associates a strategic research and design firm that specializes in innovative, often counter-intuitive solutions to the world's hardest problems: economic development, violent conflict, humanitarian assistance, energy shortages and climate change. He is an advisor to NATO, and a consultant to the US and allied governments, international institutions, private sector companies and non-profit organizations seeking to make a difference in conflict and post-conflict environments and the developing world.

Before founding Caerus, Dave served 24 years as a soldier, diplomat and policy advisor for the Australian and United States governments. He was Special Advisor to the Secretary of State from 2007-2009 and Senior Advisor to General David Petraeus in Iraq in 2007. He has provided advice at the highest levels of the Bush and Obama administrations, and has worked in peace and stability operations, humanitarian relief and counterinsurgency environments in the Asia-Pacific, Middle East, South Asia and Africa. He is a well-known author, teacher and consultant, advising the U.S. and allied governments, international organizations, NGOs and the private sector.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
41
4 star
23
3 star
7
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 72 customer reviews
Excellent analysis with plenty of good examples to support his thesis.
Richard Fox
Technology will play a role because technology makes people more interconnected, particularly in crowded coastal areas like the ones Kilcullen describes.
Michael Griswold
I am afraid after reading this book most readers will see the news in a different way.
Thomas M. Magee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Michael Griswold VINE VOICE on July 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
There is something familiar yet new about David Kilcullen's Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerilla. By looking at four trends: population growth, urbanization, coastal life, and interconnectedness, Kilcullen paints a rather convincing picture of the future of warfare. Instead of large-scale state on state warfare, Kilcullen predicts that warfare will take place where population is likely to be centered in urban areas along the coast.

Technology will play a role because technology makes people more interconnected, particularly in crowded coastal areas like the ones Kilcullen describes. I'm not sure that we have not heard many of these predictions before, but what sets this book apart is the depth Kilcullen takes his argument.

He uses several case studies from Iraq and Afghanistan, the various rebellions throughout the Middle East and Africa, and Jamaica among others to illustrate why the problems experienced by rulers and armies in these locations don't lend themselves to conventional solutions, but rather are a product of the new conditions of warfare that he sees increasing in the future.

I was impressed with the argument itself, but if we accept Kilcullen's argument that all four of the above mentioned factors play a role in future of war, what do we do about it?

At first blush, one might think that we need to strengthen government capacities in these troubled areas, but given that development in the most charitable appraisal has had mixed results that doesn't seem like a great solution. Further, these projects take money, which may be in a short supply in the era of austerity and increasingly partisan politics.

In conclusion, Kilcullen's ideas seem more than plausible, but how we deal with them is a question that this book seems to leave open-ended for further debate.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 40 people found the following review helpful By M.A. Hallisey VINE VOICE on September 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Unlike the majority of other reviewers, I did not fall in love with this book. It's good and worth a read, but nothing spectacular. I'm not sure it is even an important book (interesting, yes; important, not so sure).

For starters, I don't think there's anything truly new in the book (something the author pretty much admits to in the first few pages). Mr. Kilcullen's spends (in my uncorrected, advance copy) 265 pages (not including an appendix and notes) telling the reader that future conflict will - more often than not - take place in urban areas (by 2050, more than 3/4 of the world's population will reside in an urban setting), that most urban areas are situated within 12 miles of a coastline (hence, littoral), and that these urban/littoral setting will be ultra-connected. In short, future conflict will take place in a "Blade Runner" environment and thus is something that works to the (dis)advantage of both sides. Mr. Kilcullen also reminds us that the world is not binary (i.e., us vs them), but multi-agenda'd. Finally, Mr. Kilcullen states that in future conflicts the line between lawful conflict and criminal activity will be blurred and our comfortable Westphalian view of the "nation-state in conflict" will be displaced by a reality where the enemy is a non-state entity. I'm not finding anything new here (except for the 20th century, seems this is how the world has always been [again, something the authors admits to in the first few pages]). Not to be cheeky, but :yawn:.

While the book is informative, accessible, and well-written it is not what one should expect from an academic publishing house (in this case, Oxford University Press).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 22 people found the following review helpful By sneaky-sneaky VINE VOICE on August 6, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
There are a half-dozen actors responsible for the U.S. exit from Iraq. Barack Obama, Generals Petraeus and Odierno, Emma Sky, the voting public, and David Kilcullen. The go-to guy for counterinsurgency, Colonel-professor Kilcullen's new book analyzes a number of recent combat actions and draws some conclusions about the future.
Any number of authors have now covered TF Ranger in Mogadishu, and each brings new insight; Kilcullen describes Somali swarm tatics that are now widely applicable in the wired Arab Spring. The LeT attack on Mumbai, and the various uprisings in the Middle East over the past couple of years, Afghanistan, and Jamaica all get attention. Mr. Kilcullen is making the point that complex, crowded, coastal megacities are predominating, and will be the focus of conflict in the coming decades. Hence the title 'Out of the Mountains' describes the irrelevance of remote Afghan valleys and the importance of Mumbai, Karachi, Dhaka, or Rio.
Mr. Kilcullen also lays out his theory of competitive control, and though he never explicitly states it, shows that the Taliban should never have been removed from power in Afghanistan, as it at least provided a measure of stability. Competitive control encompasses the strongest and stickiest memes, so that organizations like Hezbollah that provide health care, reconstruction, education, and so forth, prevail by providing armed security and social services, much like functioning governments.
Mr. Kilcullen's work is standard in military colleges and think tanks, it is drawn from experience both on the ground and at higher orders of command, and makes for compelling reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search