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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The world is collapsing around our ears.."
The world might not have been collapsing around REM at the beginning of the 90s, but it was definitely changing. They'd moved beyond the distinct alt-rock that had gotten them known in the first place, they'd made two previous albums of stellar popcraft to die for (Document and Green), and it was time to try something new. So what did Out of Time have to offer? A...
Published on February 18, 2003 by spiral_mind

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not their best, but a good CD.
Out of Time is often called the best REM album, but I disagree with this. Apart from Losing My Religion, which is one of my favourite songs ever, the album is not up to some of REM's other offerings. It's still a good album, with happy pop-rock melodic songs like `Radio Song' and `Shiny Happy People' and more depressed songs like the simple but effective `Low' but there...
Published on December 31, 2001 by alexliamw


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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The world is collapsing around our ears..", February 18, 2003
By 
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
The world might not have been collapsing around REM at the beginning of the 90s, but it was definitely changing. They'd moved beyond the distinct alt-rock that had gotten them known in the first place, they'd made two previous albums of stellar popcraft to die for (Document and Green), and it was time to try something new. So what did Out of Time have to offer? A veritable buffet of shiny songwriting gems, taken into new territory for this band. Outside the simple guitar/bass/drum alternative setup, this disc overflows with other little treats: mandolin, organ, slide guitar, strings and more vocal harmonies than they'd ever used before. "Radio Song" is a low-key groove embellished with some sweet violin and a guest spot by rapper KRS-One. (And though he chants some words, don't imagine that it's anything like the definition of 'rap' today. This is about as hardcore as vanilla pudding.) The mandolin-heavy "Losing My Religion" was an unexpected-yet-natural change from what had come before. "Me In Honey" is also sweet and remarkably bright, with Michael Stipe's heartfelt vocal delivery nicely complemented by Katie Pierson of the B-52s.
Speaking of strings, they pop up in more places than ever before: the cheesy-but-fun "Shiny Happy People" (also with Katie singing - but you knew that already), the sublimely sweet "Endgame," and the stunning ballad "Half a World Away." If there was any justice in this world, THAT track would have been the smash hit that won the band a heaping armful of Grammys. It's been my single favorite song on the album for close to ten years now, and considering how much I love every minute of sugary perfection offered here.. that's really saying something.
You may have noticed me using the word "sweet" more than is common, and.. well.. when talking about the quiet beauty of Out of Time, it's the adjective that comes to mind the most. "Near Wild Heaven" builds one simple riff into something that's positively endearing. "Belong" shows bassist Mike Mills speaking some vaguely hopeful words while a background chorus soars to the sky. He also takes a vocal turn on "Texarkana" (also with more of those beautiful strings), turning a regretful lament into one of the most driving tunes on the album. I guess it's inevitable that "Country Feedback" should seem a little out of place, since it's a sad half-dirge dropped amid a string of bright hopeful tunes. The earlier "Low" is saved from the same ill-fittingness: it's not dark so much as.. well.. just low. It's carried by a quiet organ and a vaguely disjointed batch of Stipe ramblings before a semi-harsh guitar burns things up for a brief moment.
I could take well over my allotted thousand words describing how much listening enjoyment Out of Time has given me in the past decade, but I'd only end up repeating myself. It's simply classic; not because it sold loads of copies and contained a couple singles everybody now knows by heart, but because it's a strong, solid offering that hasn't aged or dated at all since its release. It's a treasure.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Out Of Time,Just in Time, February 9, 2000
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
Out Of Time is the double edge sword for REM.It brought them to superstar status yet it brought the wrath of longtime fans who thought they'd sold out.In retrospect it seems a little extreme since at the time,there was nothing like it.In the time that hairbands were soon to become an endangered species,and Nevermind was just around the corner,REM released an album that took chances when most acts at the time(heck even today)ran a formula into the ground. Losing My Religion led the way with its delicatly picked mandolin and understated string arrangement.But for those who played only the aformentioned track 2(and sometimes track 7<Shiny Happy People>)were missing out on a great album.Near Wild Heaven,Shiny Happy People,and Radio Song are bouncy pop songs that improve on the peppy tracks on Green.But songs like Low,Half a World Away & Texarkana have an air of melencholy about them.Country Feedback build in intensity as Michael Stipe sing the most personal pre-AFTP song,and Honey In Me brings both sad & happy together on the final track.Old fans could yell sell out all the want,but OOT came out at the right time which also helped pave the way for more daring music to be embraced by the mainstream and make the 90's a memorable decade in music
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is my very favorite CD of all time, January 1, 2000
By 
Robert W. Berg "Rob" (New York, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
You just can't get better than this CD...It is a work of pure genius. From the beautiful chords that begin "Radio Song," which blends straight into "Losing My Religion," which I believe is one of the greatest songs ever written, it's amazing. Then the wonderful, downbeat "Low," seguing into the devestatingly beautiful "Near Wild Heaven." That song gets me every time. And then a beautiful instrumental, "Endgame," which I also love. Then one of the most upbeat songs I have ever heard and one that always puts me in a great mood, "Shiny Happy People." I know that many people complain about this song, but I think it is wonderful. Not only does it show that, as a band, they do not have a totally cynical outlook on the world, but there are some beautiful harmonies. It reminds me of a "California Dreamin'" type song or a Fleetwood Mac type song. I think people resent it too much when a group puts out a purely joyful song...Most call it "selling out." To me, that's garbage..I call it artistic expression. But anyway, this goes right into a beautiful haunting poem/song called "Belong," which has some beautiful imagery. The next two songs together speak of a Utopia, a perfect world that Stipes dreams of going to: "Half a World Away" and "Texarkana." The same ideas are carried through "Country Feedback" and "Me in Honey." In fact, despite what many have said, I find this to be an extremely consistent album with images that carry out throughout every song, as if they are all stories being told by the same character. From the giddy (Shiny Happy People) to the introspective (Losing My Religion) to the sublime (Near Wild Heaven), it speaks of escape to a better world (Near Wild Heaven, Belong, Half a World Away, Texarkana, Country Feedback)--perhaps "Shiny Happy People" is the Utopia for which Stipes searches in the other songs. There are songs of love and regret (Me in Honey, Losing My Religion), and commentary on modern life ("Radio Song," which also continues the theme of escape and the world being destroyed or "collapsing"--This theme is also seen in "Belong" and echoes R.E.M.'s earlier song, "It's the End of the World (As We Known It).") A wonderful, wonderful album and essential for a collection of the greatest music ever made.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still Timeless, May 6, 2005
On Out Of Time, R.E.M. moved into the slot of the biggest rock band in the world. The album was an unqualified success on all fronts and R.E.M. showed that they could mix up their sound, have a big commercial hit and still retain their artistic credibility. The one sound that is strongly utilized on Out Of Time is Peter Buck's mandolin. It drives many of the songs including the album's smash hit "Losing My Religion". That song became the band's most successful single ever, peaking at number 4 and the accompanying video has become an all-time classic. Despite its hit status, the song sounded nothing like any of the songs on Top 40 radio at the time and quite frankly since. They incorporate hip hop into the album's opening song "Radio Song" as Boogie Down Production's KRS-One provides his biting commentary to the song and his deep and rough voice melds perfectly with Michael Stipe's softer sound. "Half A World Away" is a beautiful song driven by a haunting harpsichord while "Low" is a deep, pulsating track. Fellow Athenian Kate Pierson from The B-52's provides vocals on two tracks. The first is "Shiny Happy People" which is just as upbeat and bouncy as the title suggests. The song was the second top ten single from the album peaking at number 10. The second is the album's closer, the much more intense "Me And Honey". The song has a driving guitar and Ms. Pierson provides a moaning background vocal. "Near Wild Heaven" is a gorgeous track with layered vocals that reminds you of Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys. "Belong" is a spoken word song that is built around a thumping bass line and a soaring chorus of "whoahs" being layered together. "Endgame" is a guitar rich instrumental, "Texarkana" has a lead vocal from Mike Mills and "Country Feedback" has ringing guitar work from Mr. Buck. Out Of Time also finds the band juggling instruments where drummer Bill Berry plays bass or guitar on some songs, Mr. Mills works alot on keyboards and Mr. Buck tries his hand on the skins. Out Of Time became the band's first number one album despite the fact that they did not have an extensive tour to support it. The success was based on the fact that it quite simply was a tremendous album by a band who had clearly grew into their creative peak. Out Of Time has the curious distinction of being the number one album on Billboard's first Sound Scan chart (which more accurately reflects sales) and the only album to hit number one pre and post Sound Scan eras. The 5.1 mix is excellent and the documentary is a revealing look into the recording of the album. The landmark video for "Losing My Religion" is also included.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of R.E.M.'s great records., August 5, 2011
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
"Losing My Religion" is impeccably haunting. "Near Wild Heaven"'s (Brian) Wilsonian counterpoints are stunning. "Radio Song" and "Shiny Happy People" are a blast. The album tracks ("Texarkana", "Me in Honey", "Half a World Away") are consistently strong. That's 2 works of genius, 2 excellent tracks, and a strong compliment of tracks. If that's not a 5-star record, then there is no way of determining what a 5-star rock record is.

The R.E.M. fans calling this a sell-out are just nursing their sour grapes. This record is radically different from any contemporary rock records, and continues, 20 years later(!) to sound as innovative as it did the day it was released. As far as I know, the medieval-rock soundscape in this record has yet to be evoked as effectively by any other artist. This record is the opposite of a sellout. It's a shame that a small/vocal contingent of their original fan base presumes to "own" R.E.M. as well as the right to dictate to R.E.M. how they should sound. I'm convinced that most critics of mid-period REM (*Green* to *Monster*) would be hailing these records as masterpieces had another band made them. As it is, it is left to the rest of us to overwhelm this vocal minority.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Boys from Athens Wove a Masterpiece, September 16, 2003
By 
"maziris" (Columbus, OH United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
After its debut on the Warner label, R.E.M. changed gears and gave us "Out of Time", an undisputed classic in the R.E.M. catalog. Beginning the acoustic instrument bent that continued into "Automatic for the People", the boys constructed an album of truth, beauty, and, surprisingly, love songs. Michael said earlier in their career that he hated love songs, but the band produces an album of unique love songs, nothing like what was on the radio at that time - obessive, unrequited love ("Losing My Religion"), in-crisis love ("Me In Honey", said to be an answer to 10,000 Maniacs' "Eat for Two"), awkward, unsure love ("Low"), mother and child ("Belong"), and the end of love ("Country Feedback"). All these love songs, woven together with Michael's exceptionally beautiful vocals, Peter's newfound skill on both the guitar and the mandolin, and additional musical mastery by both Bill and Mike, present a solid musical tapestry. Add to the mix guest vocals by Kate Pierson and KRS-One and you have one unforgettable album.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Right Up There, January 10, 2000
By 
Ian McCowan (Silver Spring, MD, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
This is a great album. Right off the bat there are three great songs: "Radio Song" is catchy and quirky in its own way, "Losing My Religion" is, well, deservedly ubiquitous, and "Low" is just subtly delecable. Although I don't favor the songs where Stipe's vocals aren't too prominent, "Near Wild Heaven" is still a cheery and lively tune. "Endgame" is another of the band's keen instrumentals, helped by Stipe's odd yet beneficial vocal additions. I can't offer an unbiased opinion on "Shiny Happy People" ever since an... altered version of it appeared on Sesame Street, complete with Stipe and the band jumping around with a bunch of Muppets. I guess it shows that they're not ashamed to do that, but it still burned a strange image into my head. I've heard complaints about "Belong," but although I cannot in the least comprehend the lyrics, it's still one of my favorite songs due to the great (if lyricless) refrain and the kickin' background beat. "Half A World Away" is great. Period. Hauntingly beautiful and over far too quickly. "Texarkana" is... ok. I miss Stipe's voice, although the strings are keen. I've never really liked "Country Feedback." I dunno why. Too twangy. Or something. But I can tolerate it, and it's still better than a LOT of songs I've heard. "Me In Honey" is another upbeat, cool song that is above average in every respect.
Overall, this album is vastly superior to at least a few of R.E.M.'s others, and also to a lot of the crud that's coming out nowadays...
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars New Re-Release Package, November 5, 2005
If you were to judge only by sales, then this is the album that justified R.E.M.'s move to Warner Brothers Records, since "Out of Time" is the first R.E.M. album to reach #1. "Losing My Religion" was certainly their best single to date, and the power of their new major label affiliation also made sure that it was also their best-selling (for a full-length review of this song, proceed to the end of this listing). If truth be told, this album is also their most inconsistent. High points like "Losing My Religion", "Texarkana", "Half a World Away" and "Country Feedback" are offset by semi-realized efforts like "Shiny Happy People" (a top ten hit in its own right, proving that many, many people disagree with me here), "Endgame" or "Low". When compared with the `hair-metal' that passed for `rock and roll' back in 1991, though, this album sounds like a work of genius. From just about any angle, the good far outweighs the ordinary (nothing here is bad per se), and by the time the album raps up with Michael Stipe and Kate Pierson (of the B-52s, who appears on 3 tracks here) harmonizing on the uplifting "Me in Honey," it is impossible to deny the charms of being "Out of Time." A- Tom Ryan
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My First "Big" Album, August 1, 2000
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
Until around the age of 13 1/4, I had never been really interested in modern music like rock and pop. There were the odd songs that I heard on the radio which made me think "That's nice, I hope they play it again sometime" then forget about them. Then one day I pulled a tape out of the player in my mum's car and saw it was the one we used to listen to in the car on the way to and from school when I was young. I had the wonderful feeling of nostalgia as I listened to the whole thing on my Walkman, and I made an effort to listen to this album every single day. My favourite song on this album is "Half A World Away", with "Losing My Religion" coming joint second with "Country Feedback"...Well, I like all of the songs as much as each other, although for a while I got into the habit of fast-forwarding through "Belong" and "Texakarna", but now I like them both. "Out of Time" was the album that influenced me enough to start buying new R.E.M. albums like "Automatic For The People", "Murmur" and "Monster", none of which have dissapointed me. "Out of Time" has something for everyone in it, whether it's "Country Feedback" for a depressed reject (like me) or "Shiny Happy People" for a shiny happy person. It was also thanks to "Out of Time" that I began rooting through the house and found other "car" tapes like Bruce Springsteen's "Born In The USA" and "Eurythmics Greatest Hits". I really can't fault this album, every song is inspiring and displays the wonderful writing skills of Michael Stipe and co. However, if a heavy rocking album is what you're after, I'd stay away from R.E.M. in general, apart from perhaps "Monster". Out of Time is for people who have varieties of tastes, people who enjoy a gentle ride through a wide range of textures and instruments. If you like this album, I urge you to buy "Automatic For The People". It took me a while to get used to it, but now I rate it as one of the best albums of the twentieth century (and I'm not being melodramatic, I mean it).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Automatic" goes to Nashville, June 5, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Out of Time (Audio CD)
"Automatic for the People" is, according to most of the critics I have read, the seminal work by this seminal band. Perhaps so, and it is certainly a masterpiece (as indeed are so many REM albums, although I have to nominate "Fables of the Reconstruction" as my favorite IRS-years release). But if "Automatic" is more timeless, then "Out of Time" has a sweet charm that brings it to my CD player more often. Perhaps it is the melancholy alt-country feel that pervades the album that stirs my passion. The record is layered in resigned, ironic lyrics ("In this near-wild heaven/Not near enough", "My mind is racing/My heart aches/From half a world away") and the haunting textures of steel guitar, strings and harpsichord. The unutterable beauty of the songs - the sinister "Losing My Religion", the dirgelike "Low", the ironic joy of "Near Wild Heaven", the ethereal "Endgame", the remorseful waltz of "Half a World Away", the disoriented "Texarkana" and the plaintive "Country Feedback" - make for a remarkable album, from arguably the greatest alt-rock band in history. It deserves a place beside "Automatic" (and "Murmur", and "Fables", and "Document", and "Up", and several others) in anyone's CD collection.
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