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Out of Orbit: The Incredible True Story of Three Astronauts Who Were Hundreds of Miles Above Earth When They Lost Their Ride Home Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0767919913 ISBN-10: 0767919912 Edition: Reprint

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Anchor; Reprint edition (June 10, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0767919912
  • ISBN-13: 978-0767919913
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,405,084 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Combines gripping narrative and strongly defined characters . . . engrossing.”
Publishers Weekly
 
“Up close and personal . . . Jones, who obtained the cooperation of Bowersox and his crewmates, captures their feelings of separation from Earth and delivers space travel’s ever-present risk in a kinetic rendering of their harrowing return home.”
 —Booklist

About the Author

CHRIS JONES joined Esquire as a contributing editor and sports columnist, and became a Writer at Large when he won the 2005 National Magazine Award for Feature Writing for the story that became the basis for this book. Previously he was a sportswriter at the National Post, where he won an award as Canada’s outstanding young journalist. His work has also appeared in The Best American Magazine Writing and The Best American Sports Writing anthologies. He lives in Ottawa, Canada.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Terry Sunday TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 9, 2013
Format: Paperback
...or, caveat very much emptor. Unwitting buyers who don't carefully read the product description or reviews of Chris Jones' "Out of Orbit" may be suckered into thinking its a new spaceflight book. It isn't. "Out of Orbit" is just a re-titled re-release of the 2007 book "Too Far From Home." I guess changing the title of a book and hoping people don't notice it is a valid way to boost sales. But, if you buy this book and know anything about spaceflight, you will be very disappointed. While "Out of Orbit (Too Far From Home)" is not as bad as "For All Mankind" or "Rocket Men," the reigning champions of most poorly written, inaccurate, misleading, full-of-breathtaking-technical errors spaceflight books ever published, Mr. Jones' effort is a close runner-up. He should probably stick to sportswriting. Unless the publisher hired some competent fact-checkers to correct all the errors in "Too Far From Home" before transmogrifying it into "Out of Orbit" (which I doubt happened--you can still see some of the errors I mention below on pages available in the "Look Inside" feature), I suspect the following comments that I made in my earlier review of "Too Far From Home" still apply...

By the time I was 50 pages into "Too Far From Home," I was reeling from Mr. Jones' jarring, bizarre and oversimplified descriptions of spaceflight technology. Here are a few examples. He portrays NASA's early manned spacecraft as "corrugated-tin capsules held together by hardware-store screws." How about this one: during the last few seconds before a shuttle launch, "the three main engines began gimbeling [sic], testing their directional thrust...throwing off a little push with each pull of the trigger..." Huh? That makes no sense whatsoever. Here's another one. As the shuttle enters orbit: "...
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Bourquin on December 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a very good read; Despite what the Editorial Comment says, Columbia was lost on February 1, 2003, not the 23rd.
However I was dismayed by a serious, SERIOUS, error of detail: on page 21 the author states that STS-71 Atlantis's External Tank was attacked by woodpeckers, making necessary time-consuming repairs to the foam insulation. NO!!!!! NO NO NO!!! That was the STS-70 Discovery launch vehicle! Just because both flights launched in the summer of 1995 does NOT mean you just pick a flight to attach an incident to. To me this is a major, catastrophic detail-error. Does it matter to the story? Of course not, but if the author gets information that is easily made correct with 5 minutes of research, who's to say the rest of the book's details aren't wrong? I just happen to be familiar with that incident, but not with necessarily everything else he discusses, and again, how can I trust that he's gotten everything else right when there's such an unbelievably glaring error early in the book?!?
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dave English VINE VOICE on June 25, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the paperback version of the hardback 'Too Far from Home.' If you want to read reviews for this book there are many good ones already online, just search for 'Too Far from Home'. Which is a more correct title I think for two astonauts and a cosmonaut stuck in the International Space Station after the space shuttle Columbia accident. They were a long way from home, but they were in orbit. So Out of Orbit seems to make little sense, unless it refers to getting out of orbit. Whew!

Anyway, I hope searching for 'Too Far from Home' helps you find out about this paperback version.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was expecting a very well written book, classy and elegant. After all astronauts are not just blue collar mechanics; they are educated scientists! The analogies in the book were mostly irreverent and did not make much sense. They were vulgar sometimes.
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Format: Paperback
Formerly titled Too Far From Home, Out of Orbit (2007) is a captivating true chronicle of three astronauts - Americans Kenneth Bowersox and Donald Pettit and Russian Nikolai Budarin - stranded in space for three months.

Space shuttle Endeavour lifted off in November 2002 as Expedition Six. The mission objectives were to: (1) deliver cargo to the International Space Station; (2) relief the three astronauts on board ISS so that they could return to Earth after six months in space; and (3) remain on ISS for four months to learn how to live in space.

Already onboard the ISS were Expedition Five's two Russian cosmonauts and a female American astronaut. The ISS was a stepping stone to further space exploration: a giant "mobile" built and equipped by the United States and Russia, as well as Canada, Japan, Brazil and 11 European nations. Docking was achieved successfully, the crews exchanged places, and the Expedition Five team returned to Earth.

The three Expedition Six crew members would be picked up by shuttle Atlantis and the Expedition Seven crew in March. But this never happened.

On February 1, 2003, space shuttle Columbia had been orbiting Earth and was due to return. Sixteen minutes from home, during re-entry, the shuttle disintegrated, killing all seven American astronauts onboard. NASA put an indefinite halt on the shuttle Atlantis mission - meaning that the Expedition Six crew were stranded in the International Space Station without a ride home. Instead of being eight weeks to the end of their mission, their ride "wasn't coming any time soon."

How long would they be in space? How long would their food and water last? How did they fill their days? What does living in zero gravity indefinitely do to your bones, your body, and your mind?
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