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Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative Paperback – March 15, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Capstone; 1 edition (March 15, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841121258
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841121253
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 6.4 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #101,580 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"I shall add Ken Robinson's absorbing account of creativity to my personal list of gems. I was sorry to reach the end of the text, as it had maintained its momentum throughout. The reading may finish, but the thinking goes on, just as you would expect from a book on this intriguing subject." (Times Educational Supplement, 11th May 2001)

"This is a thoughtful book .... A truly mind-opening analysis of why we don't get the best of people in a time of punishing change." (The Director, June 2001)

"This well-written book focuses on the widening gulf between academic institution teachings and the feelings, emotions and imagination that drive us as humans." (Arts Professional, 4th June 2001)

"I recommend that you read the book, take part in the debate and become part of the new paradigm" (People Management, 12th July 2001)

"this book will stimulate and challenge" (Professional Manager, September 2001)

"...a rattling, informal read, sparkling with ideas, jokes, anecdotes and ideas.." (Music Teacher, December 2001)

From the Inside Flap

Out of Our Minds There is a paradox. Throughout the world, companies and organisations are trying to compete in a world of economic and technological change that is moving faster than ever. They urgently need people who are creative, innovative and flexible. Too often they can’t find them. Why is this? What’s the real problem — and what should be done about it? Out of Our Minds answers three vital questions for all organisations that have a serious strategic interest in creativity and innovation.
  • Why is it essential to promote creativity? Governments, companies and organisations are concerned as never before with promoting creativity and innovation. Why is this so essential? What’s the price of failure?
  • Why is it necessary to develop creativity? Why do so many adults think they’re not creative (and not very intelligent)? Most children are buzzing with ideas. What happens to them as they grow up?
  • What is involved in promoting creativity? Is everyone creative or just a select few? Can creativity be developed? If so, how? What are the benefits of success?
In Out of our Minds, Ken Robinson argues that organisations are trying to fix a downstream problem that originates in schools and universities. Most people leave education with no idea what their real abilities are. He says what all organisations, including those in education, can do immediately to recover people’s creative talents. Robinson also argues for radical changes in how we think about intelligence and human resources and in how we educate people to meet the extraordinary challenges of living and working in the 21st century.

More About the Author

Ken Robinson is an internationally recognized leader in the development of creativity, innovation and human resources. He has worked with national governments in Europe and Asia, international agencies, Fortune 500 companies, national and state education systems, non-profit organizations and some of the world's leading cultural organizations. He was knighted in 2003 for his contribution to education and the arts.

To learn more about Sir Ken Robinson, visit his website at:

www.sirkenrobinson.com

Customer Reviews

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It is very well written, is well thought-out, and highly relevant.
D. Clawson
'Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative' by Ken Robinson is one of the 'must read' books for modern classroom teachers.
Mr. Kenneth D. Young
This book provides analysis with respect to where we are and establishes a strategy for dealing with the future.
Frank C. Bates

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

200 of 213 people found the following review helpful By talkaboutquality VINE VOICE on November 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
After reading the book, I had a hard time remembering why I had thought it would be great, so I looked again at Sir Ken Robinson's recent and popular lecture at [search "Sir Ken Robinson on TED Talks"]. Now I remember -- he's an entertaining speaker, with some pretty good points about the genius of children and how we school it out of them. But the book, well, it's subtitled "Learning to Be Creative" but that really only comes in the last chapter, and his recommendations seem very conservative. He spends much too much time before that--building up his case--and that case is watered down by being second-hand. If you want to know about what schooling is doing and why, read Ivan Illich's Deschooling Society. If you're really interested in the physiological basis of non-academic intelligence, read Goleman's Emotional Intelligence (which Sir Ken quotes, but better the original). In short, the book, though it's just 200 pages, is simply too long.

I did find one memorable point: that many people miss the chance for creativity because they're not trying in the field that's natural to them. The idea that, in order to be creative, find your medium, whether it be in the "traditional" arts such as painting or dance, or in any other occupation. Whatever is closest to your heart.
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55 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Brian Barnes on June 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
There are certain books that manage to be authoritative, entertaining and thought-provoking and are also well-written and richly exemplified. Few authors are able to fashion this attractive mixture. Alvin Toffler and Charles Handy can craft it, and in education, David Hargreaves has the knack. I shall add Ken Robinson's absorbing account of creativity to my personal list of gems.
Creativity is one of those topics that excites some and enrages others. In the wrong hands it can be twee, syrupy, smug, territorial, giving the impression that you have to belong to a special club, with its own argot and conventions. For Ken Robinson it is none of these, but rather a universal talent that people have, often without realising it. Society in general, and education in particular, can squash the imagination and rock children's self-confidence.
What I like about this book is the breadth of its scope ... and the fascinating little stories that illustrate the points being made, tales from history, social and economic background factors, test items, incidents from school life. The book is peppered with these vividly recounted vignettes about thinking and learning, or lack of it ... Many of the illustrations and anecdotes are personal to the author, about people he has met inside and outside the university world, organisations he knows, stories he has been told.
Robinson's line of argument is carefully constructed through the seven chapters ... Because imagination and invention do not progress in straight lines, or along predictable routes, whole organisations must create and sustain a culture that promotes creativity, rather than stifles it.
Read more ›
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Brian Barnes on October 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
Sometimes a writer has an uncanny kknack of sharply focusing something which up until then you had not seen in all its simplicity and brilliance. This book does that but at the next moment it makes connections never before imagained. Even the most obstinately prosaic and safe thinkers will be tempted out of their box by Ken Robinson's ideas, theories and speculations. What's more, he writes as he speaks, in a way that, magnetically and compulsively, is simply irresistible.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By M. Lang on November 4, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While Robinson perhaps uses more words than necessary to make his point, I found this book refreshing because it gets to the heart of the failures in our education system that few others seem to see. The focus of education reform today is on testing to verify that all students learn certain basic facts, e.g. no child left behind. There is some merit to the new attention paid to accountability for outcomes. However, as Robinson clearly points out, the real issue is that we are not helping our students to understand and leverage their own unique talents, and we are not preparing them to deal collaboratively with a world where there are few black and white answers. Until we as a society properly identify the problem, any solutions that emerge are guaranteed to fall short--no matter how well intentioned. I found the book to be short on guidance about solutions and approaches that can address the core issues, but at least it gets the problem in front of anyone who reads it.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Scot DeJong on August 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
Out of Our Minds is clear and very well written. It provides a wonderful overview of the thinking behind the development of the English approach to education, its philosophical underpinnings and shortcomings for our current world. Fascinating for those interested in the histroy of thought behind the education system. However, if, like me, you are looking for techniques to develop your creativity - this book will not fulfill this desire. It's recommendations are geared toward those behind the design and implementation of education programs.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Kenneth D. Young on January 9, 2007
Format: Paperback
'Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative' by Ken Robinson is one of the 'must read' books for modern classroom teachers. Robinson challenges many of the widely held beliefs and processes of education found in the majority of western countries. In a time of rapidly changing social and educational climates, the ideas that are raised in this book allows teachers to consider the real purpose of educating students for a modern society.
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