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  • Outlandos D'Amour by The Police (1990)
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Outlandos D'Amour by The Police (1990)

90 customer reviews

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Audio CD, October 25, 1990
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$17.51 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by DJ-MEGGASOUNDS and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Outlandos D'Amour by The Police (1990) + Reggatta de Blanc [Digipak] + Zenyatta Mondatta [Digipak]
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Britain's Police got its start in the late-'70s days of punk, but the trio's background in jazz, fusion, and rock belied the punky image suggested by the band's dyed-blond hair. Indeed, where many punks were inspired amateurs, the Police (Sting on bass and vocals, Andy Summers on guitar, and Stewart Copeland on drums) were accomplished players who quickly developed a sophisticated approach to the power-trio format. Still, this debut album is filled with growing pains, with a handful of tracks far more interesting than the rest. The Police's primary stylistic innovation was to put the pulse of reggae into a rockier context, a strategy evident in the up-tempo "Can't Stand Losin' You" as well as in the band's first hit single, "Roxanne," a love song to a prostitute that would remain Sting's best- known tune until he wrote "Every Breath You Take." To this day, the first two notes of "Roxanne" are among the most recognizable melodic hooks in contemporary music. --John Milward

1. Next To You
2. So Lonely
3. Roxanne
4. Hole In My Life
5. Peanuts
6. Can't Stand Losing You
7. Truth Hits Everybody
8. Born In The 50's
9. Be My Girl - Sally
10. Masoko Tanga

Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: A&M
  • ASIN: B000002GDH
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #183,573 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By M J Heilbron Jr. VINE VOICE on April 30, 2003
Format: Audio CD
As I listened to "Outlandos" on my iPod last night, after I dutifully purchased all of the newly remastered editions on CD, I felt the need to wax rhapsodic.
Listening to these impossibly crisp and detailed recordings, I remembered, as if it was yesterday, buying the LP. After "Ghost In The Machine", I had become a monstrous Police fan. I lived and breathed the Police. I went back and bought their first three records, and proceeded to memorize them.
This will not be an unbiased review.
I made a copy of the LP, on a cassette tape, Years later, when CDs came out, I repurchased the Police catalog, as I have with each remastering. The box set goes without saying. VHS tapes, laserdiscs, and now DVD's. I have listened to them in every conceivable media.
As the million-miles-an-hour "Next To You" opened the album, I was taken back to my high school and early college days. These guys were supposed to be punk, or punk-ish, but like The Clash, they threw more sounds...more textures into the mix. Sting occasionally sings with a tonsil-thrashing punk howl, but the airy voice always reverts to a classic melody some time before the final chorus. Andy Summers' guitars sounded like no one else at the time, and Stewart Copeland's polyphonic drumming put him head-and-shoulders above the DIY crowd.
Calming myself down just a bit, I must admit this is NOT a perfect record. "Masoko Tanga" sounds like three guys messing around in a studio with a tape running. The "Sally" interlude is funny the first few times, then gets kinda tedious. "Hole In My Life" is too long.
Who cares?
Read more ›
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Frederick Baptist on February 17, 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Born out of the tail end of the British punk scene, this debut album by the Police is a severely underrated offering. Sting gives us a hint of his great lyric-writing abilities so evident on future albums on tracks like "Roxanne" and "Born in the 50's". It becomes very clear as one listens to the tracks here that this is not your usual run-of-the-mill punk band with lame, brain-dead lyrics and 3-chord 4/4 time music but the great musicianship of Summers, Copeland and Sumner and the complex stylings and arrangements of the compositions come to the fore on "Hole In My Life" and "Can't Stand Losing You" This digipak version is a real treat too as the sound quality is very well remastered and sounds excellent. Recommended.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By egon_beeblebrox on December 26, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I became a Police fan upon many nights cruising with pals cranking their greatest hits album. Upon hearing all those songs, I decided that this was a band that I needed to look more into. So, I quickly bought all their albums, as I'd already done with Pink Floyd. Seeing as how The Police have around 1/3 the number of albums that Pink Floyd have released, this was much easier on the wallet.

OUTLANDOS d'AMOUR is an excellent album, and I think it just might be The Police's finest. There's really not one bad song on it. "Next to You" is a great rocker. I think "Born in the 50's" might be my favorite one on the album. It should've been released as a single, along with "Roxanne" and "Can't Stand Losing You." "Roxanne," by the way, is one of the greatest rock songs ever, even with its vehement overexposure. Just avoid the MOULIN ROUGE version.

Buy this album, quick-like.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Johnny on May 8, 2001
Format: Audio CD
The rookie Police album, 'Outlandos d'Amour,' is superior to most others of their kind. There are a couple of diamonds here, namely the classic rock single "Roxanne" and a foot- tapper called "I Can't Stand Losing You." "Next to You," "So Lonely," and "Peanuts" are also solid efforts. This record has more misses than any other by the Police, however. Their sound is not developed yet, and it does have a rougher edge than their later production. Many claim the early Police to be punk wannabe's. While that can be certainly claimed on their very first recorded tunes that were never released, such as on "Fallout" and "Nothing Achieving," the Police never had a direct punk sound. Instead the first album sounds more like a run-of-the-mill rock album than any other they released. Plain and simple, songs like "Born in the 50's" and "Truth Hits Everybody" are boring. But my goal isn't to bury this record in the ground. 'Outlandos d'Amour' is a solid outing. It has high points. But I would recommend any other Police album above this one, simply because they all have better musicianship and song writing. If you purchase this record, make sure to order it on CD format, so you can skip the growing pains revealed here.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. Cross on December 29, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I'll admit that I didn't really like this album when I first got it. I already owned and loved "Zenyatta Mondatta" along with "Synchronicity", so it was a little hard to make the jump to "Outlandos". The reason for this was because the songs are generally harder to get into as most of them aren't as instantly catchy as "Every Breath You Take" or "Don't Stand So Close to Me" (though "Roxanne" and "Can't Stand Losing You" obviously are). Sting's voice is the weakest on this particular album, but it's still great and very likable. The lyrics are, as usual, well-written, catchy and very memorable. The production is decent here, but the CD could use a good remastering. As for the songs, they're mostly growers - I hated the first 4 songs on here, but after a while I finally got into them (they're more interesting than fun, arguably). Overall, if you're looking for a great Police album or one that will stand the test of time then "Outlandos d'Amour" will greatly satisfy you. Absolutely recommended!

Highlights include:

"Roxanne"

"Hole In My Life"

"Peanuts"

"Can't Stand Losing You"

"Be My Girl -- Sally"

the rest is great, too
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