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Outlaw Blues [VHS]

18 customer reviews

$36.99 & FREE Shipping. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by prof56 and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Product Details

  • Actors: Peter Fonda, Susan Saint James, John Crawford, James T. Callahan, Michael Lerner
  • Directors: Richard T. Heffron
  • Writers: Bill L. Norton
  • Producers: Steve Tisch
  • Format: Color, NTSC
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • VHS Release Date: December 6, 1993
  • Run Time: 100 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6300269221
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #306,870 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

An ex-convict becomes a country star with the help of a back-up singer, to the consternation of another star who stole the ex-con's song.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By David Baldwin on July 11, 2009
Format: DVD
This is a film that's hard to dislike but it's hard to recommend particularly at it's prohibitive price tag. Essentially, it's the cinematic equivalent of a Chinese meal which is to say easily forgettable. Some sporadic chuckles but not that many. Susan Saint James and Peter Fonda do make an engaging screen couple, though. If you can get this one as a rental do so.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ann Osborn on January 4, 2004
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
I throughly enjoyed the movie Outlaw Blues. Maybe because I had a small cameo role in it. I was in nursing school at the time 1977 at Brackenridge Hospital in Austin, Texas. They needed some protesters to hold signs that said Save Bobby. We were actually in school that day in our blue nursing student dress uniforms and we got to partcipate in the protest sceneand chanted Save Bobby, I am the one at the end with the short black hair holding one of the protest signs. There were two or three of us doing the scene. This is why the movie is especially special to me, something to share with my children and grandchildren.
It is twenty five years down the road and I remember the movie like it was only yesterday and yes I did graduate to become a Registered Nurse.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By studiorow on March 14, 2009
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
This movie was very important to me because I watched them film some scenes at my dorm at The University of Texas at Austin in 1976. They took over Dobie down on the second level. I got to see Susan St. James up close and in person. She was wearing Frye boots in the scene and I had to get a pair just like them. I took a picture of Susan St. James wearing her boots on the back of a motorcycle before they filmed the scene. I got a picture of Peter Fonda poking his head outside his trailer parked on Guadalupe Ave in Austin. He only said a few words to us..."Sex, Drugs and Rock and Roll.!" That was so Peter Fonda in 1976. I never saw the movie when it was finished. It took me 32 years to find it on video. Go figure. Good times.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mary K. Shelton on March 21, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
This movie had good music scores and the story line believable! Peter Fonda plays a good "I only want what's coming to me" kind of guy. Susan St. James is great in her supporting role as the guardedly interested, ever so pretty woman who helps him hide from the authorities the prison warden has in his pocket, then assists him to further his career. Her belief in Peter's character makes the movie happen!
I'd like to get my hands on a copy of the sountrack!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 14, 2005
Format: VHS Tape
I watched the movie Out Law Blues and I liked this movie! It is about an ex convict played by Peter Fonda who has a talant for songwriting but is taken advantage of by a singer who steals some of his songs which turn out to be major hits and Susan St. James plays the backup singer who helps him get even! Thsi is a good movie and I want to see it put on DVD!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John D. Page on April 18, 2006
Format: VHS Tape
i just saw this movie again and i have to say it's very good. peter fonda is a much better actor than everyone thinks. he also has his fathers easy going charm and isn't as shrill as his sister.sadly he has been stuck in low budget movies for so long that we forget how good he is.

outlaw blues starts in huntsville prison texas where fonda is doing time and writing songs. enter james callahan as a johnny cash type who goes to the prison to make an album.fonda plays the title tune and is blowen of by callahan. weeks later the prison hears fondas song on the radio but it's callahan who is singing it and taking all the credit for it. fonda get out of jail and goes to set things right.in the fight that follows fonda shots callahan by mistake and the chase is on.

fonda and st. james make a great screen couple and the movie is really fast paced and fun. a great way to spend some rainy sunday afternoon
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Silver Screen Videos on February 2, 2014
Format: DVD
It's easy to picture a movie today being made about record piracy and copyright infringement, but the topic was highly unusual in the 1970s when cassette tapes were the musical state of the art. So, Outlaw Blues was a 1977 oddity... a movie in which a man comes looking to get even against a thief who, instead of taking his car, money, land, or woman, took his prize song instead. The movie may have been unusual then, but it's a charming little oddity now.

Peter Fonda plays Bobby Ogden, a convict who writes a catchy country tune called "Outlaw Blues" and plays it for big time country singer Garland Dupree (a George Jones lookalike). Dupree likes the tune so much that he steals it and makes a #1 hit out of it. Bobby tries to confront Dupree but things go bad and he winds up on the run, aided by a savvy would-be manager Tina Waters (Susan St. James). Somehow, despite being a wanted fugitive, Bobby manages to record his own version of the song and goes around the state of Texas marketing and promoting it, with the increasingly flustered cops two steps behind.

Outlaw Blues is played strictly for laughs... we never believe for a moment anyone is in real danger. It's the type of movie that features incredibly inept and obtuse police wrecking their cars with great abandon in a series of silly car chases. However, Fonda and St. James have good chemistry together, and the movie manages to make a few points about the music industry that are still valid today. In addition, Fonda does his own singing, including the catchy title tune, and acquits himself well.

Overall, the movie is similar to a two hour episode of The Dukes of Hazzard with slightly better writing and considerably better acting talent.
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