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Outline of a Phenomenology of Right Hardcover – July 1, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0847689224 ISBN-10: 0847689220

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (July 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0847689220
  • ISBN-13: 978-0847689224
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,470,933 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The publication of this meticulously accurate translation, of the genuinely classic work of a towering figure of twentieth century political philosophy, marks a major event in the world of English-speaking scholarship-which will finally have to come to terms with the challenge of Kojeve's highly original and uncompromisingly rationalist left-Hegelian phenomenology of justice. (Pangle, Thomas)

I found the translation of Kojeve's Outline of a Phenomenology of Right quite impressive. The translators have remained remarkably faithful to the original, even maintaining much of Kojeve's sentence structure, punctuation, and literary idiosyncracies while conveying this difficult work in a surprisingly clear and accessible translation. The editor's notes are excellently done, clarifying allusions in the text, explaining obscure references and noting ambiguities in the French original. Bryan Paul Frost and Robert Howse have provided the kind of translation and editorial apparatus made possible both by a fine grasp of the French language and by a deep familiarity with Kojeve's philosophical work as well as the broader tradition of legal and political philosophy. (Daniel Mahoney)

Kojeve was one of the last century's most influential philosophers, yet one of the least known to the public. This work, unpublished by the author, displays the principles and features of the 'universal and homogeneous state'--a state never seen but often presupposed by politicians as well as thinkers. Every reader deeply interested in today's politics will want this book.... (Harvey Mansfield)

Admirers of Alexandre Kojeve's influential Introduction to the Reading of Hegel will be especially grateful for the publication of this translation of his Outline of a Phenomenology of Right. It renders more concrete many of the tantalizing arguments of that earlier work and should also serve to enrich our impoverished contemporary debate over globalization. (Tarcov, Nathan)

This translation merits high praise for its scrupulous care and precision. It is sufficiently literal to give the reader the confidence that Kojeve's argument has been faithfully conveyed, but sufficiently well-polished in its English to be no less readable than the French. (James Nichols Claremont Review Of Books)

Kojéve's work is always brilliant, and this particular work . . . expounds a very noteworthy position. . . . A highly original articulation of a unique and penetrating philosophical position. (Donald J. Maletz,)

Kojeve was one of the last century's most influential philosophers, yet one of the least known to the public. This work, unpublished by the author, displays the principles and features of the 'universal and homogeneous state'--a state never seen but often presupposed by politicians as well as thinkers. Every reader deeply interested in today's politics will want this book. (Harvey Mansfield)

Outline of a Phenomenology of Right is an impressive and exhaustive effort that seeks to clarify the meaning of droit. The book, by Alexandre Kojève, not only unpacks the term, but in the process layers droit with Hegelian and Marxist historiography such that the reader is offered a rich historical understanding of droit that is both challenging and thought provoking. Readers can take away from this book an appreciation for the interconnectedness of law, justice, morality, rights, and the role of the state and political institutions in giving meaning to these terms. (Schultz, David Law & Politics Book Review)

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: French

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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Martin on March 22, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is a remarkable work by the author that originated the `End of History' debate. Kojeve is perhaps most famous (in the English-speaking world) for his argument with Leo Strauss in `On Tyranny' and also his interpretation of Hegel in his `Introduction to the Reading of Hegel', which was a collection of notes to a course given by Kojeve in the thirties. This work (the `Introduction') can be correctly described as one of the first exercises in existential-Marxism thanks to its groundbreaking mixture of Hegel, Heidegger and Marx.

It (the `Introduction') is a very `dramatic' reading of Hegel in which Masters rise to mastery thanks to their willingness to fight, kill and die while those not as willing sink to the level of Slaves. The driving force in this struggle, btw, is neither Reason nor mere animal need but the all-to-human Desire for Recognition. But this is not the last word: mastery is an impasse; it goes nowhere, it can only reenact endlessly the Fight that created it. Slavery, however, through Work changes both the world and the slaves themselves. Thus Kojeve is correct to say that History is the history of the working slave. This struggle between Masters and Slaves dialectically unfolds until the appearance of the French Revolution, whose `Freedom, Equality, Fraternity' goes forth to change the world by bringing Recognition to all. It is Kojeve's contention that we have been living in post-history since that Revolution - in which History technically ended - with nothing happening except the rest of the world being brought into line with the Ideals of the Revolution. Thus Kojeve says (of Hegel, though he could have said it of himself too) that Hegel "definitely reconciles himself with all that is and has been, by declaring that there will never more be anything new on earth.
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