Buy Used
$6.93
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by -Daily Deals-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This Book is in Good Condition. Used Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Outside/Inside: A Fresh Look at Tzniut Paperback – 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 1997
$27.46 $6.93
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 104 pages
  • Publisher: Targum/Feldheim (1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1568711239
  • ISBN-13: 978-1568711232
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.3 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,878,829 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Freeman on February 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
There is a story in Gila Manolson's beautifully written little book about a six year old boy who bounds, naked into his living room after a bath. His father says to him, "That's a nice little bottom you have there but wouldn't it be better if you covered it up?" "If it's so nice why should I cover it?" asks the boy. "Because," says dad, "you also have a beautiful nishama (soul) and that's a lot easier to see if you're wearing some clothes."
Gila Manolson's words are a pleasure to read. She writes about observance from the perspective of the literate, humorous, modern woman that she is. As with her previous book, "The Magic Touch" Mandolson spares us the "whens" and "hows" of observance and goes directly to the "why." She is gentle and generous. And even to a committed rationalist like me she makes ankle length skirts and covered heads seem not just modest but borderline ... dare I say it... holy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Geis on May 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
As someone outside the Jewish-faith, I'm not very aware of tznuit (other than noticing that there are some Jewish women that cover themselves more than others).

This book gave me good insight on how i respect myself and what I allow others to respect me for. Although I don't show this by wearing long skirts and covering my hair, it helped me to become aware of how much i focus on the physical in myself and others, and this has led to a shift in my attitude and behavior, which if you ask me is far more important than following a set of rules/guidelines without true understanding.

This is obviously written for teenagers, but as a 25 year-old woman, I think it's important that women of all ages look at the way that they value themself (cause let's face it, teens and pre-teens are constantly being aided in improving their self-esteem, it's those of us being bombarded with ads for botox and liposuction that could use some help...).
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 30, 2002
Format: Paperback
I read this book to try to understand the "modesty" rules followed by Orthodox Jewish woman. I came to it as a modern woman and a feminist who was more than a little put-off by any type of dress code. After reading this book, I had to reevaluate the present societal value of appearances. I came away with a greater understanding of self-worth.
This book explains the observance of modesty in simple and clear language with many anecdotal accounts. More importantly, the author tackles the opposition of inner worth and outward show. Are you only what you appear or are you even more? And if you are more than why would you need to show off? I'm taking a second look at how I want to present myself and how much more my inner self matters.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Heather Jacobson on February 20, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read the 1997 edition of this book more then 10 years ago, and it was a transformative experience for me. Another reviewer of this edition called her "gentle and generous," and I think this is spot on. Coming at the topic from not an entirely sympathetic viewpoint, I was struck by her understanding in this book about the conflict that many modern young women feel about the concept of tzniut, and her ability to speak to the purpose and importance of tzniut in a way that resonates with that population. In the 1997 book, she was nonjudgmental, sympathetic, and understanding, and because of that her words rang true.
Twelve years later, my own daughter is approaching adolescence and beginning to question all of these rules, and I thought that a joint reading of Outside Inside was the perfect way to start a discussion of the meaning of tzniut, so I ordered the new (2005) edition of the book. Fortunately I preread it before showing it to my daughter. It is very, very similar to the original edition, but the entire tone is changed. There is a subtle shift that eliminates much of the "gentle and generous" aspect of the original. On reading it, I did not feel that I was reading a book by someone who understood why young people might have difficulties with some of the concepts of tzniut; it felt more like a lecture at times by someone who really could not understand why anyone would dress immodestly, and rather looked down on them for it. As I said, much of the material was the same, but the tone of it turned me off, even now when I am myself fully convinced of the importance of tzniut. So bottom line: buy the original!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By profuselyprofound on July 25, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was surprised at the length of this book, it is quite brief and not an extensive
review on Tzniut (Modesty). I was expectant for a more indepth look at the topic,
however the book shared personal reflections and stories and is very easy to read
and also easy to relate to. I do recommend the book as something for easy reading
and everyday understanding of Tzniut, it is not extensive and does not go into
Halachic teaching on Modesty, so if you looking for that you will not find it here
however if you want an everyday understanding then this is the book to go for.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?