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Outside Over There (Caldecott Collection) Paperback – February 28, 1989


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Outside Over There (Caldecott Collection) + In the Night Kitchen (Caldecott Collection) + Where the Wild Things Are
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Lexile Measure: 590L (What's this?)
  • Series: Caldecott Collection
  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (February 28, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064431851
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064431859
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (71 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #123,241 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A book for all ages. . . . Sendak has never produced anything like [this]." -- --H.

About the Author

In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.


More About the Author

For more than forty years, the books Maurice Sendak has written and illustrated have nurtured children and adults alike and have challenged established ideas about what children's literature is and should be. The New York Times has recognized that Sendak's work "has brought a new dimension to the American children's book and has helped to change how people visualize childhood." Parenting recently described Sendak as "indisputably, the most revolutionary force in children's books."
Winner of the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are, in 1970 Sendak became the first American illustrator to receive the international Hans Christian Andersen Award, given in recognition of his entire body of work. In 1983, he received the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award from the American Library Association, also given for his entire body of work.
Beginning in 1952, with A Hole Is to Dig by Ruth Krauss, Sendak's illustrations have enhanced many texts by other writers, including the Little Bear books by Else Holmelund Minarik, children's books by Isaac Bashevis Singer and Randall Jarrell, and The Juniper Tree and Other Tales from Grimm. Dear Mili, Sendak's interpretation of a newly discovered tale by Wilhelm Grimm, was published to extraordinary acclaim in 1988.
In addition to Where the Wild Things Are (1963), Sendak has both written and illustrated
The Nutshell Library (1962), Higglety Pigglety Pop! (1967), In the Night Kitchen (1970), Outside Over There (1981), and, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy (1993). He also illustrated Swine Lake (1999), authored by James Marshall, Brundibar (2003), by Tony Kushner, Bears (2005), by Ruth Krauss and, Mommy? (2006), his first pop-up book, with paper engineering by Matthew Reinhart and story by Arthur Yorinks.
Since 1980, Sendak has designed the sets and costumes for highly regarded productions of Mozart's The Magic Flute and Idomeneo, Janacek's The Cunning Little Vixen, Prokofiev's
The Love for Three Oranges, Tchaikovsky's The Nutcracker, and Hans Krása's Brundibár.
In 1997, Sendak received the National Medal of Arts from President Clinton. In 2003 he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government. Maurice Sendak was born in Brooklyn in 1928. He now lives in Connecticut.

Customer Reviews

My 3 year old daughter and I loved it!
Angela McCormick
This is a good picture book as the it helps to develop many values in a child such as being responsible and also teach a child to love their sibling.
Tong Bee Yoke
First, it's a Maurice Sendak book--both as the author and the illustrator.
Athelstan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

86 of 88 people found the following review helpful By Shanshad VINE VOICE on May 19, 2002
Format: Paperback
Sendak's work almost always takes a reader by surprise. His themes are not comfortable ones, particularly for parents. He deals with the internal desires of children, the kinds of things that can be interpreted as unacceptable and frightening. For instance, WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE, which has become a classic in children's literature is about a boy who acts out--who becomes a "wild thing" himself. His transformation back into a boy is a gradual and wonderful part of the picture book, but in no way tries to deny that the "wild thing" aspect exists.
Likewise, OUTSIDE, OVER THERE is a tale of siblings, jealousy and responsibility. The heroine is Ida, a young girl who's father is away and so Ida is left to watch her baby sister, a task she's not too fond of. Ida is much more caught up in her own world. Yet when her sister is kidnapped by goblins, Ida must go off on a magic adventure to rescue her. She's not wholly devoted to the quest at first--and nearly passes her sister right by when she becomes absorbed in the magic of the quest. In the end, she rescues her baby sister, destroys the goblins and returns home--this time firmly responsible for her sister and determined to be so until her father returns home. It is not a comfortable tale, but it is one that highlights feelings that young children may have and discusses them in a format they can identify with.
The language and pictures are beautiful and stunningly poetic, in typical Sendak style. But the story and the way its told can be frightening for some children; themes of kidnapping by goblins, the ice-baby left behind, and Ida's making the goblins dance themselves away, all conjure images that hit on some primal fears and discomforts. The author is not trying to make us comfortable, but that's what makes him such a good author.
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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 30, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I can understand why some might hesitate to read this book to young children -- my mother refuses to read it to my girls, who are just-turned-two and almost-five. But my girls, both of them, ADORE this book. It seems to speak to them on some deep level. Sendak knows that we can't shield children from scary things; the best we can do is lie and pretend they don't exist, which undermines their trust in us, since they can sense the lie, and then they *are* scared. Sendak feels we should instead help them learn to deal with big scary things -- the scariest being our own fears, our anger, our mistakes.
My girls are enthralled by Ida's resourcefulness, her bravery, and the consequences of her initial carelessness. They instinctively understand the baby sister's vulnerability, the power of the father's love. They love it when Ida outsmarts the baby-goblins. I urge people not to prejudge this book, but to let your child decide whether he likes it or not. It is very powerful, and very beautiful.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 26, 1998
Format: Hardcover
My daughter and I read this book 4 to 5 times a day. She is captivated by the baby goblins and feels very strongly about Ida, and how she searches for her sister. She has pretty much memorized the book and I hear her walking through the house singing softly about Ida & how much her PaPa loves her. I highly recommend this book to any parent for their child.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on January 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover
If Maurice Sendak had sat in his office one day and pondered to himself, "I should like to stretch my artistic muscles a little", he could not have come up with anything better than the eerie "Outside Over There". The plot is a classic one. Big sister Ida cares for her little baby sister while her father is a way and her mother pines in the arbor. When goblins steal the baby for their bride, it's up to Ida to go outside over there and get her sister back.
For those of you who thought Maurice Sendak made, "Where the Wild Things Are" and then just stopped, you are in for a surprise. This book is a fantastic series of images, exhibiting beautifully a young girl's love for her sibling. Sometimes thought to be the inspiration for the movie Labyrinth (not true: the book "Labyrinth" by A. C. H. Smith was the real basis), the book is beautiful in a way that simultaneously enchants and disturbs. For example, the hooded goblins are nothing more than babies themselves, and clever Ida finds a way to make them dance to their death. The changeling exchanged for Ida's sibling is an eerie ice statue, the most Sendakian image in this entire book. As for the pictures as a whole, the author has excused himself from his previous cartoonish style. The people pictured in this book are strikingly realistic, and they display emotion beautifully. The tender scenes between Ida and her little sister are touching.
This is not a book for everyone. But then, many of Sendak's books are not for everyone. To be a fan of the works of Maurice Sendak is to be comfortable with a certain amount nudity and oddity. Just the same, there are so many things to like about this book that I'd be sad to turn anyone away from it. I'll say this. You will never find its twin. This original piece of work is filled to the brim with interest and imagination, such as you will have a great deal of difficulty finding elsewhere.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Edward Aycock on May 31, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Quite a departure for the beloved author/illustrator of "Where the Wild Things Are"... or is it? This story also deals with monsters, ... but of a different kind. This story would seem to bear more than a passing resemblance to the movie, "Labyrinth", but this book was in the planning stages long before that film made it to production. The artwork in this book is simply entrancing (although it seems a bit faded, I am not sure if that is the desired effect or because of the plates fading after a number of years.) This book is still a great read. There is some concern that it may be a bit too mature for younger readers, but I know that as a kid, I would have found this story fascinating. It's an "Alice in Wonderland" without the sunny golden days, a world in which everything has gone amuck. This is one of the high points of Sendak's work.
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