Buy Used
$4.68
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by AnchorBayBooks
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Well-read copy. Covers show some wear, a few page corners bent. Stored in a smoke-free environment.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Outsider in the House Paperback – September 17, 1998


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.18 $4.68

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Verso (September 17, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1859841775
  • ISBN-13: 978-1859841778
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 0.7 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #255,488 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Bernie Sanders of Vermont uses the story of his 1996 reelection campaign to paint the picture of what it's like to be the first Independent elected to the House of Representatives in 40 years and the only one ever elected to four consecutive terms. Outsider in the House provides a good look at such recent political skirmishes as the Gulf War, NAFTA, and health care reform. In his concluding chapter, Sanders puts forward explicit proposals for tackling such issues as bridging the gap between rich and poor (develop a truly progressive tax code, he says); campaign reform (establish automatic voter registration, end soft money, cap total election expenditures and provide free TV time for political ads); and balancing the budget (drastically cut defense and corporate welfare). --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

What's it like to be the odd-man out in Congress? Sanders, the first independent elected to the House in 40 years, sheds some light on running for and serving in the House. Mayor of Burlington, Vermont, from 1981 to 1989, Sanders won his first term in 1990, identifying himself as a progressive. Using his 1996 reelection campaign as the framework for the book, Sanders bounces around in time to present a very personal account of his political life. His thoughts on major political figures, such as Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich, are often quite blunt, and at times he delivers some cheap shots at his Republican and Democratic colleagues. Sanders exposes the reader to his Socialist/Progressive positions on all kinds of issues, from bovine growth hormone to NAFTA. Sanders is a dedicated representative, but he should stick to writing legislation. Readers looking for a balanced treatment of Congressional politics might consult Ronald D. Elving's Conflict and Compromise (S. & S., 1995) and Steven Waldman's The Bill (LJ 2/1/95).?Thomas J. Baldino, Wilkes Univ., Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
0
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J.L. Populist on December 9, 2010
Format: Paperback
Bernie Sanders chronicles his 1996 re-election campaign and his views on various political issues.
What sets this book apart from other books in the category is that Sanders is an elected Independent and he's from the unique state of Vermont.

Bernie Sanders addresses a number of battles from the Gingrich era.

Some of the general issues he addresses are:
>"Payoffs for layoffs" for Lockheed-Martin.
> The fight over minimum wage legislation.
> The identity of a host of "wedge issues" exploited by Republicans.
> Why the poor not voting empowers Republicans.
> Why NAFTA "was a sellout to corporate America."
> How the debate over health care is about economics and class politics.

On page 189 Bernie Sanders explains being an Independent in Congress:
"I am an independent because neither of the two major parties represents the interest of the middle class and working people of this country."

This is a well-written book from a rare Independent Congressman.
Another angle that makes this book of interest is that Sanders is a self-admitted "democratic socialist" so that political viewpoint is detailed.
I recommend this book for anyone desiring to read about Progressive politics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rick M. on April 10, 2011
Format: Paperback
The other reader reviews give a good idea of what's in this Terrific book, but require further comment. One reviewer says Bernie declares his socialist approach to politics but doesn't tell readers what socialism means. While it's true there's no 'one-liner' definition, the whole book lays out what it means to be a socialist & what socialists do & stand for, & even how they can (maybe) get elected in the USA! I've never read a more clearly presented, generously thoughtful book of ANY political persuasion that tells as much about what (truly) democratic politicians should be doing, how they can get elected & then stay in office to get it done, how to communicate with constituents & generally make a positive difference in their country. Anyone who wants to get elected & work for All the People can learn how--& where--to try from this 1 book.
Beyond that, I've never read another book that makes so clear what politics should be all about, or how to recognize what a true representative of a large group of people should be doing, as well as how to make it possible even in 'America'.
If you read only 1 book on politics in your lifetime, this is the one; read with an open but critical mind & it will uplift you.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 25, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Sanders does a few wonderful things in this book - first off, he shows what socialists truly believe - I now realize that, while I don't agree with them, I got a false impression of their views from the mass media. The book also gives a detailed account of how hard it is to make it as a third party candidate in America, and does so without becoming dull at any points. Finally, Sanders covers a wide range in issues in this book. Overall, very interesting for anyone even remotely interested in American politics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jason Seagraves VINE VOICE on December 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
As a former congressional candidate, I have read numerous books on the subject of congressional campaigns, and this is by far the best. Mr. Sanders chronicles his ascent from pitiful protest candidacies with the socialist Liberty Union Party of Vermont, where he often got just 1 percent of the vote, all the way to his eventual victory as mayor of Burlington and election to the U.S. House of Representatives. This quick, fun, and informative read has it all - the actual campaign strategy and logistics, what it's like to raise money, the human and family costs of running for office, and of course, what it's like to actually legislate in D.C. The fact that Mr. Sanders is an independent makes the book particularly interesting. The one thing I was disappointed with, however, was the fact that the self-ascribed socialist did not spend even one word describing what he thinks "socialism" is. Other than that, this is a perfect book, even for the non-socialist lover of politics (and third-party/independent politics in particular) such as myself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 1, 1997
Format: Hardcover
OUTSIDER IN THE HOUSE is an interesting and intriguing book by the only Independent in the Hosue of Representatives, and the only Independent *ever* elected to four consecutive terms!

How did formerly conservative Vermont elect a democratic socialist as its Representative in the House? This book will tell you.

How did Bernie Sanders first get elected Mayor of Vermont's largest city? What did he tell Bill Clinton when they met? What does it feel like to see your Congressional colleagues gutting welfare? What is the 52-member Progressive Ccaucus, and why did Bernie Sanders help found it?

This book answers all these questions in a fast-paced narrative which weaves together Sanders'most recent re-election campaign (targeted by the Republican leadership, the NRA, and corporate America, he managed to win by 23 points!), his fights on Capitol Hill, and a brief history of the most successful progressive political movement in modern America.

And if that is not enough, the book concludes with a clear-eyed look at America's major problems -- and presents reasonable ways of addressing each of them.

Highly recommended.

[Of course, you might consider that this review was written by the book's co-author, Huck Gutman....]

Still, I think you will like it, and be energized by reading it. Our purpose in writing it, after all, was to give people hope: it is really possible to take on the corporate powers and big money interests, and beat them at the electoral game.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again