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Outward Bound School & Library Binding – February 1, 2000


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School & Library Binding, February 1, 2000
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Product Details

  • School & Library Binding: 220 pages
  • Publisher: San Val (February 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0613293185
  • ISBN-13: 978-0613293181
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,340,292 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

When 15-year-old street punk Linc Marani is arrested during a routine shakedown, his life is set on a new course that leads to the stars. Faced with the choice of spending the rest of his life in work camps or joining a mysterious recruitment program, Linc opts for the latter. Soon he's transferred from jail to a series of top-secret camps where the weak wash out and the bodies and minds of the remaining incorrigibles are disciplined and honed. Linc's benefactors, tough but fair, reveal themselves to be from the "Outzone," the area of space beyond Mars where independent "zoners" are struggling to establish a new civilization based on truth and service. Although Linc makes the final cut, will he be able to overcome the habits of his past and the obstacles posed by his rival, class bully Arvin, to succeed in the new community where he has made his first real friends? The action never lags in Hogan's (Bug Park, etc.) 22nd-century coming-of-age yarn, though its outdated vision of macho camaraderie and female submission can grate. Overall, Hogan does a fine job in making real, and even heroic, his young protagonist's struggle to redefine himself far away from anything he has ever known.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Set up by a local criminal to take the rap for a shady deal, 15-year-old Linc Marani receives an unexpected chance to create a new future for himself?with the stars as his destination. The latest novel by the author of Bug Park (LJ 3/15/97) depicts a young man's rite of passage as he makes his way from a troubled youth to a responsible citizen of the future. Reminiscent of the early works of Heinlein in its appeal to teenage readers, this sixth novel in the Jupiter series belongs in most sf or YA collections.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By John D Lewallen Jr on July 11, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is a hard book for me to review. I am of an age to have read Heinlein and Asimov's juveniles when I was a teenager, although most of them I read as an adult. I read this book primarily because I am a big fan of James Hogan. I have not read any of the other Jupiter Novels, but I get the feeling from reading some of the descriptions and reviews on Amazon that there is a specific formula or "bible" that is set up for this series. That is not bad in and of itself, but I couldn't help but feel that Hogan was a bit constrained by this format. I remember the Heinlein juveniles as being a bit more free-wheeling. I would say that if you are an adult fan of Hogan, don't expect too much of this one. If you are a teenager and have enjoyed the other books in the Jupiter series, you will enjoy this one as well. It is a quick read, the characters are likeable, the science is realistic, and the changes in the main character and his friends as they come of age are believable.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Richard R. Horton on September 8, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Outward Bound is one of Tor's Jupiter series of young adult science fiction novels. These are trumpeted as an attempt to recreate some of the spirit of Robert Heinlein's famous "juveniles". In particular, they have mostly been set in the solar system, and have featured fairly realistic space exploration technology, and teen age protagonists. In these ways they resemble much of Heinlein's work. But too close attention to the model can result in a pale imitation instead of something special and new, and I fear that Outward Bound isn't new enough; or different enough.
The protagonist of the novel is Linc Marani. Linc is 15 or so as the book opens. He gets into a bit of criminal trouble, and gets offered an alternative to prison: a special new program.
The rest of the book details the steps of this program. They are pretty much what you might expect: a touch of discipline, learning about unsuspected skills (naturally including leadership), and learning about responsibility, for his own life and for others. The other main characters are a typical set: the sidekick, the girlfriend, the rival who does Linc wrong but isn't without ability, the weaker rival who Linc turns to his side. Linc progresses through the program, overcoming several obstacles: his problems with the bullying rival, resolved first by violence, subsequently by earning his respect; learning a cherished skill and facing disappointment when he learns he might not be good enough to do make a career of his skill; and finally a return to his home, where he learns that his problems on Earth just aren't important anymore.
Hogan is a good storyteller, and the book was enjoyable to read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Brian Sullivan on December 4, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Outward Bound by James P. Hogan is the sixth book in the Jupiter series. This book was relatively easy to follow for me, a college age reader who is still getting used to cyberpunk type novels. The story is predictably told in short intervals, but without any major jumps occurring in the flow of the plot. As with many other cyberpunk novels, Outward Bound's main character, Linc Marani, knows only a community of selfish, backstabbing individuals whose greatest enjoyment comes from the use of drugs. At first, Linc sees no wrong with life being this way. Also consistent with other cyberpunk novels is the ultimate struggle the main character has with the stagnant society he finds out he wants to escape from.
One striking difference, however, is Hogan's acute characterization of Linc. The fifteen-year-old Linc Marani has spent his whole life within a few city blocks, running around with the wrong crowd, trying to scrape up enough money to get him and his parents by. The reader is able to see Linc's character change for better or worse with the decisions he makes. The story centers around Linc's ability to find a meaning for his life and his place in the universe. Will Linc be able to overcome his rough start to life and find his niche, or will he continue spiraling toward nowhere?
Hogan's confusing descriptions of futuristic technology coupled with a somewhat predictable plot prevents the novel from being a personal favorite, but the topics and issues the story brings up makes it quite worthy of reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Wildness VINE VOICE on March 20, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Linc Marani, teenage stooge for drug dealers, is arrested and left to the system by his bosses who he once admired, he has only two choices - be written off and dropped in a hole in the prison system or check out a program run by Outzoners who are building a new society beyond Mars' orbit.

Set in the same unverse as the other Jupiter Novels by Charles Sheffield (Higher Education, The Billion Dollar Boy, and Putting Up Roots) and Jerry Pournelle (Starswarm), Outward Bound would be the fourth chronologically after the Sheffield books.

While Higher Education and The Billion Dollar Boy were very good entries in the series, and Putting Up Roots was a bit of a let down, Outward Bound misses the mark. This is not because it is a bad book; actually it is a pretty good book on its own. But, it is almost a retelling of the first book in the series, Higher Eduction, with different characters and different scenarios, but basically the exact same formula: Boy goes bad, boy chooses different path offered instead of being written off, boy is tested with other troubled teens, boy must deal with bully/nemesis without getting thrown out of the program, boy does well and goes to space, boy learns more in space and earns responsibility, boy saves the day. That series of events are identical with both books in the series. Oh, and Outward Bound is basically a Science Fiction version of the Outward Bound program.

So, if you only ready one, this one would be good, but Higher Education would be better as it establishes the universe and sets the tone for the series.

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A Guide to my Rating System:

1 star = The wood pulp would have been better utilized as toilet paper.
2 stars = Don't bother, clean your bathroom instead.
3 stars = Wasn't a waste of time, but it was time wasted.
4 stars = Good book, but not life altering.
5 stars = This book changed my world in at least some small way.
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