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Owls in the Family Paperback – March 30, 1996


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Owls in the Family + The Dog Who Wouldn't Be
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 980L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 91 pages
  • Publisher: Yearling; Reprint edition (March 30, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440413613
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440413615
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (69 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #27,611 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Every child needs to have a pet. No one could argue with that.

But what happens when your pet is an owl, and your owl is terrorizing the neighbourhood?

In Farley Mowat's exciting children's story, a young boy's pet menagerie – which includes crows, magpies, gophers and a dog – grows out of control with the addition of two cantankerous pet owls. The story of how Wol and Weeps turn the whole town upside down is warm, funny, and bursting with adventure and suspense. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Farley Mowat was born in Belleville, Ontario, in 1921, and grew up in Belleville, Trenton, Windsor, Saskatoon, Toronto, and Richmond Hill. He served in World War II from 1940 until 1945, entering the army as a private and emerging with the rank of captain. He began writing for his living in 1949 after spending two years in the Arctic. Since 1949 he has lived in or visited almost every part of Canada and many other lands, including the distant regions of Siberia. He remains an inveterate traveller with a passion for remote places and peoples. He has twenty-five books to his name, which have been published in translations in over twenty languages in more than sixty countries. They include such internationally known works as People of the Deer, The Dog Who Wouldn’t Be, Never Cry Wolf, Westviking, The Boat Who Wouldn’t Float, Sibir, A Whale for the Killing, The Snow Walker, And No Birds Sang, and Virunga: The Passion of Dian Fossey. His short stories and articles have appeared in The Saturday Evening Post, Maclean’s, Atlantic Monthly and other magazines.


From the Hardcover edition. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

My 6 & 8 year old loved it!
Book lover
This book got me hooked on reading when I was little.
Lee
Granddaughter loved the book.
Loveon Henke

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jeff T. Smecker on November 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
Read Owls in the Family. It is a great book because it has lots of information about great horned owls. This book is about two boys, Bruce and Billy. They go on an adventure to find an owls nest. The boys end up getting two owls who become their best friends. The two owls Wol and Weeps become best friends. Billy's dog Mutt doesn't get along with Wol, but gets along with Weeps. Wol is always stealing Mutt's bone and he gets so annoyed. It's very exciting, funny, and an interesting book. Borrow it or buy it at your nearest bookstore.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Wayne S. Walker on July 10, 2011
Format: Library Binding
In this perhaps slightly fictionalized account originally published in 1961 in The Atlantic Monthly, the author, who apparently went by the name Billy when he was a boy, tells how he and his friend Bruce and their dogs Mutt and Rex, who live on the prairie in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, find an owls' nest with three baby owls in it while on a hike in the nearby bluffs. They determine to add owls to their collection of pets. At first, Mr. Mowat is against the idea because the boys already have enough pets, but when he realizes that the owls might eat Billy's rats, rabbits, and gophers, he decides that maybe owls wouldn't be so bad after all.
Sometime later, after a bad storm, the boys, along with another friend named Murray, return to find the owl nest blown down and two of the now half-grown young owls dead. However, a third, probably the oldest, had survived in a pile of brush, so Billy adopts it and names it Wol. Shortly after that, he finds another owl that a couple of mean boys had captured and were tormenting. Buying the bird, he names it Weeps. The book tells how Wol brings dead skunks to the family for dinner and terrorizes Billy's French teacher, the postman, Ophelia the maid, and the minister, how Weeps never does learn how to fly and is afraid of everything except Mutt, and how the two birds shake up the whole neighborhood during the T. Eaton Department Store parade. But when Billy's dad gets a new job in Toronto and they can't take the owls with them, what will Billy do?
This book is a delightful tale that has practically nothing objectionable. A few euphemisms (heck, darn, and gee) occur. During his investigation of the owls' nest, Mr.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
If you're new to the writings of Farley Mowat, this book is a great place to start. You will love it. If you have kids, THEY will love it. Wol and Weeps, the two feathered protagonists, are two of the most lovable pets you'll ever read about in print. Wol especially steals the show when it comes to dealing with crows, dogs, skunks, and a really mean French teacher called Fifi.
Make no mistake, Owls in the Family is a family treasure that deserves to be read time and again. Pick it up without hesitation!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Anne R. Nicolaou on October 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
Great heartwarming stories about a boy, 2 owls and a dog. I recommend this for all ages. The cover markets this as a childrens's book, but adults who like animals will love this story too. A bird lovers' delight!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on October 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a book review on Owls in the Family.Owls in the Family takes place in Saskatoon,saskatchewan.It's about a boy who finds an owland riases it as a pet.This story has a sad ending but it really brings you into the book.I would highly recommend this book to someone.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 31, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I read this as a child and recently found it in a box in my parents basement. I am reading it to my six year old son. I have to explain a few things, like it is no longer allowed to go find yourself a pet owl, but he is enjoying the story. It has some other points of political incorrectness, but still an excellent story of boys outdoors.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 13, 1998
Format: Paperback
This warm, poignant, funny book is a wonderful demonstration of how even ONE person can help wildlife in trouble. Even better to think that little boy grew up to be a world-class advocate of animal and eskimo rights. Farley Mowat is a treasure. Thank heaven the grade school teacher at a school in Temple, Texas assigned Owls as a class project. Thank heaven the only book left in the library was "Owls in the Family." Farley Mowat has brought great laughter and poignancy to my family and is spoken of as a friend. We always say -- "Want to read a wonderful book (author) read "Owls in the Family" (Farley Mowat) !!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 7, 1997
Format: Paperback
Every year I read this book to my 5th graders and
everyone in the class loves it. It is my favorite book to read to start the year. I even have kids who go on to read "The Dog Who Wouldn't Be." The book is written in 1st person and the kids get really excited about owls because not only is it a story of the authors adventures with two owls, but it tells a lot of facts about owls and the northern praries.
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